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Full text of "Clarion Call, September 13, 2007 – May 1, 2008"

Vol. 94, nos. 1 - 24 



September 13, 2007- 

May 1 , 2008 







Clarion Call 
Sept. - Dec. 2007 










A 


B 


C 




1 

2 
3 
4 


Title 


Date 


Page 




Abortion: agency for alternatives to abortions provides free aid 


December 6,2007 


1 




Accreditations: Clarion University leads state system 


Sept. 13,2007 


1 




Admissions Office deems freshman class largest in recent years 


Sept. 27. 2007 


1 


5 
6 
7 
8 


ALF: CUP students prepare for 54th Annual A.L.F. 


Sept. 20, 2007 


8 


Amerjcan Bar Association re-approves CUP paralegal program 


October 4. 2007 


2 




Art Gallery: Crafted exhibit comes to University Gallery 


Sept. 13,2007 


2 




Basketball: Men's basketbaH ready to tip-off season 


November 15, 2007 


2 




9 
10 
11 


Basketball: Men's defeats Bloomsburg 69-67 in double overtime 


! December 6,2007 


5 


1 

1 


Basketball; Men's off to a slow 0-3 start, with loss to Wheeling Jesuit 


[November 29, 2007 


6 


Basketball: Women's basketball set to host Clarion Classic 


November 15, 2007 


6 




12 
13 


Basketball: Women's off to 3-1 start 


November 29, 2007 


9 


i 

1 


Basketball: Women's off to a 5-1 start this season 


December 6,2007 


9 


14 


Bill to ban cell phones yet to be passed 


October 18, 2007 


10 


lb 


Bill would add U.S. funds to fight staph spread 


October 25. 2007 


10 




16 


Budget: CUP budget to be balanced by end of 2008 fiscal year 


Sept. 27, 20O7 


4 




17 


Career Services host a week of job-search skills 


Sept. 20, 2007 


1 




18 


Construction to begin mid-October 


Sept. 13,2007 


2 




19 
20 
21 


Crime: South Street, Fifth Ave. area causes concern 


November 15, 2007 


2 




Crime: Threats on two Clarion University students occur within weeks 


Sept. 13,2007 


2 




Cross Country finishes in second place at California Invitational 


Sept. 20, 2007 


4 




22 


Cross Country: X-C finishes fifth at East Regionals 


htovember 8, 2007 


10 




23 


Cultural night draws large crowd 


November 15, 2007 


4 


24 
25 
26 
27 


CUP efficiency efforts awarded 


November 8, 2007 


8 


Dance Team: to be held 


December 6,2007 


8 


Debate team: CUP debate team hosts tournament 


November 1,2007 


9 


Delta Zeta holds mock accident to raise awareness 


October 25, 2007 


9 


28 
29 
30 


Diversity: Building Bridges encourages campus leadership 


November 29, 2007 


1 


Donate-A-Meal: CUP aids community during hoHdays 


December 6,2007 


1 




bagle Ambassadors promote student-alumni relations 


Sept. 20, 2007 


1 




31 


emergency communication system: CUP to implement new 


Sept. 27, 2007 


8 


I 


32 


Equity Week focuses on Women's golobal issues 


November 8, 2007 


2 


j 


33 


Faculty senate discusses construction plans 


October 11, 2007 


2 


i 


34 
35 


Faculty senate discusses MRSA incident 


October 25, 2007 


8 


Football drops to 0-8 with tough 21-14 loss at Fairmont State 


October 25. 2007 


8 


36 


Football finishes season 0-1 1 after overtime loss 


November 15, 2007 


8 


37 
38 
39 


Football jumps out to an early lead but SRU rallies for the win 


October 18, 2007 


8 


Football keeps it close to the end, but falls to #20 lUP 38-31 


November 1,2007 


8 


Football loses offensive battle at Edinboro 49-30, drop to 0-10 


November 8, 2007 


1 


4U 

41 


Football stays close early but falls to 23rd ranked West Chester 49-21 


Sept. 20, 2007 


1 


Football: Golden Eagle football falls to 0-4 with 52-10 Loss to Bloomsburg 


Sept. 27, 2007 


9 


42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 


Football: Golden Eagles football falls at home to Kutztown 35-13 


Sept. 13, 2007 


10 


Football: falls to 12th ranked California 56-0 


October 4, 2007 


1 


Football: Golden Eagles football falls to Shippensburg 41-23 on homecomir 


October 11, 2007 


1 


Fries, Sarah reaches 1,000 kills 


Sept. 27, 2007 


2 


Going Green: Clarion University goes "green" 


Sept. 13,2007 


1 


Golf takes first at Hal Hansen Invite 


Sept. 20, 2007 


10 


Golf team finishes in top two in each of last two tournaments ( 


Dctober4,2007 


10 


C3olf: Clarion announces the addition of women's golf for fall 2008 i 


November 1,2007 


1 


Sroves, John: addresses role of faculty senate [ 


December 6,2007 


1 


Harrison, Jennifer: off to a successful start ( 


Dctober25,2007 


1 


1 













Clarion Call 
Sept. - Dec. 2007 








1 


Clarion Call 
Sept. - Dec. 2007 








A 


1 B 


1 c 


- 




A 


B 


C 


62 


_ Hip Hop: CUP hosts second annual Hip-Hop symposium 


October 11, 2007 


2 


103 
104 
105 


Stemmler, Kevin: Clarion professor's study spans the globe 


October 11, 2007 


10 


63 
54 
55 
56 
57 


_ Hip-Hop Symposium: Second annual attracts over 800 


October 25, 2007 


4 


Student Senate elects new senator 


November 29, 2007 


1 


_ Homecoming: Pep rally kicks oft Clarion homecoming 


October 11. 2007 


^ 5 


Student Senate removes section of policy 


November 15, 2007 


1 


_ Honors Program: to nost 4ifnd annual conference 


October 25, 2007 


8 




106 
107 
108 
109 
110 


Student senate: policy changes approved 


October 25, 2007 


1 


Howard University: CUP hosts delegation 


December 6,2007 


8 


Student Senate: reviews initial decision 


November 29, 2007 


1 4 


Insomnia hiim hestlval: five students compete 


November 1,2007 


9 


Students on CUP campus opt to go without shoes for one month 


October 4, 2007 


9 


59 
60 


Kuntz, Melissa: Art Professor's work on display at gallery In Lawrenceville 


November 8, 2007 


1 


Students receive aquatic companions 


Sept. 20. 2007 


9 


Lingwall, Andrew conduct PR panel in Pittsburgh 


Sept. 20, 2007 


1 


Swim and dive teams finding early success 


November 1.2007 


9 


Military bcience 110 new alternative to HP 1 1 1 


November 1,2007 


1 


111 


Swim teams finish second and fifth at Zippy Invititational 


December 6,2007 


10 


61 


More schools otter leacner bonuses as House debates issue 


Sept. 20, 2007 


1 


112 


Swim teams: Men and Women's swim teams host Duquesne 


November 15. 2007 


10 


62 


MRSA case confirmed 


October 18, 2007 


2 


113 
114 


Tennis improves record to 2-1 with win against Westminister 


Sept. 20, 2007 


10 


63 


MRSA: second case confirmed 


October 25, 2007 


2 


Tennis places second at East Regionals 


Sept. 27. 2007 


1 


64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 


Olivas-Lugan, Miguel researches US and Mexico Technology 


Sept. 13, 2007 


4 


115 


Terman, Philip opens Faculty Author Seminar Series with his poetry 


Sept. 20, 2007 


1 


Parking: Clarion university implements new parking assignments 


Sept. 13,2007 


9 


116 
117 
118 


Text Message AJerts: University implements 


December 6,2007 


1 


PASSHb CUP awarded $1.3 million by 


October 18, 2007 


4 


Transitions: CUP implements new transcript 


November 29. 2007 


1 


Pedestnan Safeiy: Senate addresses pedestrian safety 


November 8, 2007 


9 


United Way 5K: CUP teams compete in United Way 5K 


NoverTJber 8. 2007 


5 


PLCB Clarion PoNce Borough funds 


October 4, 2007 


10 


119 


Volleyball defeats Lock Haven for second time this season 


October 18, 2007 


"~ 9 


HK professional to speak at Clahon 


November 8, 2007 


10 


12U 


Volleyball loses in PSAC final to play Lees McRae in NCAA playoffs 


November 15, 2007 


10 


Prioleau, Rachelle:New dean addressed senate about priorities 


November 29, 2007 


1 


121 
122 
123 
124 
125 
126 
127 


Volleyball seniors prepare for final home game of their careers 


November 1, 2007 


10 


Promotion: Professors earn tenure 


November 8, 2007 


1 


Volleyball suffers first defeat of season 3-2 to California 


Sept. 20, 20O7 


10 


73 


Proposed [-80 toll passes state legislature, needs federal approval 


Sept. 13, 2007 


1 


Volleyball team off to perfect 11-0 start after win over SRU 


Sept. 13. 2007 


1 


Provost Search: President please with response 


Sept. 13. 2007 


2 


Volleyball wins again, set to play West Chester in PSAC 


November 8, 2007 


1 


/4 
75 


PRSSA to campaign for statewide challenge 


October 11, 2007 


2 


Volleyball: Golden Eagle Volleyball gets another win, defeats Slippery Rock 


October 11, 2007 


1 


Rather, ban Tiles lawsuit against CBS 


Sept. 20, 2007 


4 


Volleyball: Golden Eagles keep on rolling, defeats lUP 3-0 


Sept. 27, 2007 


1 


/b 


Recycled Percussion rocks Clarion for a second time 


November 1.2007 


6 


Volleyball: middle hitters provide key contributions for Golden Eagle 


October 4. 2007 


2 


78 
79 
80 
81 


Relay for Life: Preparation begins at Clarion University 


December 6,2007 


^~ 9 


128 
129 


Volleyball: Spreading breast cancer awareness at CUP 


November 1,2007 


4 


Request for tenure track applications announced 


Sept. 27. 2007 


9 


WCUB-TV's remote truck gets a make over 


October 18, 2007 


6 


Richard, Erinj^vins PSAC's; Clarion finishes eighth 


November 1,2007 


9 


130 
131 


Wireless mic systemClarion to purchase 


October 11, 2007 


1 


Richard, fcrin: finishes 61st at NCAA Championship 


November 29, 2007 


10 


wolf, Jamie named female Division II scholar athlete 


October 18, 2007 


10 


Roc members explore their adventurous side 


November 15, 2007 


10 


132 


Wrestlers getting ready for PSAC Championship 


December 6,2007 


10 


82 
83 
84 


Rombach, Corin and Devin: finding success together in doubles 


October 25. 2007 


1 


133 


Wrestling off to a 2-4 start this season 


November 29. 2007 


10 


RSb funding policies questioned 


October 4. 2007 


1 


134 


Zellers, Amie Rendell names CUP student Trustee 


Sept. 20, 2007 


10 


RbU: Requested funds allocated to two RSOs 


October 4, 2007 


1 








8b 
86 


RSO: Student senate announces RSO statuses and search for new senatoi 


October 18, 2007 


5 




Schmader, Jared sets school record with 66 i 


October 18, 2007 


6 




8/ 
88 
89 


Senate allocates funds 


November 1.2007 


6 




Senate appoints new senator 


Sept. 20, 2007 


9 




Senate discusses policy after late request 


Sept. 27, 2007 


9 




9U 
91 
92 
93 


Sex Talk excites CUP students 


Sept. 13.2007 


9 




Soccer defeats Gannon 1-0, remains in third place in PSAC- West 


October 4, 2007 


9 






Soccer duels to a 0-0 tie with Kutztown, Currently in third place in PSAC 


Sept. 27. 2007 


10 


1 






boccer has off-day and loses at lUP 


Sept. 13,2007 


10 




94 


Soccer loses to (Jalifornia 2-0, remains tied for fourth in PSAC-West 


October 11. 2007 






95 


Soccer shutout for seventh straight game 


October 25, 2007 






96 


Soccer shutout for the fifth consecutive game i 


October 18, 2007 






9/ , 
98 . 


Soccer ties Edinboro 2-2, remain tied for second in PSAC West i 


Sept. 20. 2007 






Soccer wraps up season with 4-1 loss i 


^Jovember 1,2007 


4 




99 J 

100 J 

101 i 

102 i 


soccer: uianon shutout for seventh straight game < 


Dctober 25, 2007 


6 




sports: 1 he oest of (iolden Eagle Falls Sports 2007 ( 


December 6,2007 


9 




state system schools reach agreement ( 


Dctober 18, 2007 


9 




5teelers dominate in Tomlin's debut < 


Sept. 13, 2007 


10 








mmmmi 




CUP tops state 
schools In 
accredlcatlons 

-80 p%. 



o 




CUP gets Intimate 
with Sue Johanson 




Volleyball off to 
11-0 start 




One copy free 




ECL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




I CALL 



Volume 94 Issue 1 



September 13, 200? 



Construction to begin mid-October 



Donald Baum 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dwbaum@clarlon.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 10 - 
Construction of three new 
buildings at Clarion 
University will begin in 
mid-October. 

The three new buildings 
are all part of a campus ren- 
ovation that is already 
underway with the current 
work being done on the new 
Biotechnology Center in the 
area of what was once the 
Pierce Parking lot or lot A. 

Two new resident halls 
are also in the plans for the 
Clarion campus renova- 
tions. Unlike the 
current dorm-style resi- 
dence halls of Nair, 
Wilkinson, Givan, 
Ballentine, Becht and 
Ralston, in which students 
currently pay $1,597 per 
semester and share public 
bathrooms and shower facil- 
ities, the new residence 
halls will display apartment 
style features. 

These features will 
include one bathroom for 
every two students, air con- 
ditioning, high-speed inter- 




Construction on the new science and technology center will begin in October and the new 
building will be 98,000 square feet (The Clarion Call/ Jessica Lasher). 

net, cable access, and tele- Foundation Inc. The bonds will be $3,200 per student 

are to be repaid using stu- 
dent fees. A four-person 
suite in one of the new resi- 
dent halls, to be situated in 
the Ralston Hall flats area, 



phone connections. 

The new $20 million res- 
idence halls are being 
financed through the 
Clarion University 



per semester. 

See 

"CONSTRUCTION" 
continued on pags 2. 



President pleased 
with response to 
Provost search 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

8_()el<oebief®clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 11 - The 
search for a Provost con- 
tinues into the Fall semes- 
ter, as former Provost 
Linda Nolan announced 
her resignation in March 
of 2007. 

Since the announce- 
ment of Nolan's resigna- 
tion, Clarion University 
has had the search for a 
new Provost/ Academic 
Vice President underway. 

A Provost Search 
Committee made up of fac- 
ulty and admini-strators 
has been formed to moni- 
tor the search and to 
review applications as 
they are received. 

President Joseph 
Grunenwald said, "We are 
pleased with the response 
thus far." 

Grunenwald was 
unable to release the num- 



ber of applications 
received. 

Interviews of appli- 
cants have not taken place 
yet, as the closing date for 
applications is September 
21. 

"We are hopeful that 
on-campus interviews may 
be completed during the 
fall semester with a rec- 
ommendation and selec- 
tion that would allow a 
starting date as early as 
late January 2008," said 
Grunenwald. 

While there is current- 
ly not one particular indi- 
vidual that is acting as 
Provost, Grunenwald indi- 
cated that '"leadership 
within the Division of 
Academic AfTairs is being 
provided by an Interim 
Leadership Council com- 
prised of members from 
the Deans Council and the 
President's Executive 
Council." 



Threats on two Clarion University students occur within weeks 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

S ebvori@clariQn.edu 

Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s bekoeblerclarion.edu 



CLARION. Sept. 10 - 
Within weeks, two Clarion 
University students have 
been threatened by 
unknown suspects. 

A female Clarion 
University student was 
allegedly approached and 
threatened by an individual 
on Thursday, August 20 at 



approximately 12^50 p.m. 

An e-mail concerning 
the incident was sent out to 
the entire university com- 
munity around 2^15 p.m., by 
the Director of Public Safety 
David Tedjeske. 

She was approached in 
the parking lot near 
Chandler Dining Hall by a 
male, which according to the 
e-mail, "allegedly 

approached her from 
behind, grabbed her arm 
and threatened to sexually 
assault her." 

The female described the 
suspect as a college-aged 
white male, approximately 
6'0" tall, medium build, 



wearing a muscle t-shirt, 
blue mesh shorts, and white 
high top sneakers. He was 
also reported to be wearing 
a white baseball cap. The 
female was not reported to 
have been injured. The inci- 
dent is still under investiga- 
tion. 

However, freshman, 
Rena Sims, said she still 
feels secure about walking 
on campus. "They [Public 
Safety] got it [information 
about the incident] out 
well." 

Freshman Casey Perry 
said she was not surprised 
to hear that an incident had 
been reported to public safe- 



ty this early in the new 
school year. 

"I was already taking 
precautions, not walking by 
myself," Perry said. 

Perry indicated that she 
had been following the sug- 
gestion given at the Sexual 
Harrasment Seminar dur- 
ing Discovery Weekend. 

"The sexual harassment 
seminar stated that females 
shouldn't walk around by 
themselves," she said. 

Tedjeske was not avail- 
able for comment. However, 
the office of University 
Relations said they know 
nothing further than what 
was provided in the e-mail 



and that the investigation is 
ongoing. 

Most recently, a second 
female student reported 
that on September 9 around 
1 a.m., she was approached 
by an unknown male on 
South Street, near eighth 
Avenue. 

She described the indi- 
vidual as a white male, 20- 
21 years of age, with black 
hair, around 6'0" and a 
medium build. 

He supposedly was 
wearing dark jeans and a 
long sleeve pin striped shirt. 

The male allegedly 
pushed the victim against a 
tree, but her cell phone rang 



and he fled the area. 

University Relations 
sent a mass e-mail across 
the University concerning 
the incident and also includ- 
ed several precaution 
reminders. 

University Relations 
advises students to do the 
following: walk in lighted 
areas, do not walk alone, 
share your plans with oth- 
ers, and report suspicious 
behavior. 

Public Safety is asking 
that if anyone has informa- 
tion concerning either inci- 
dent to please call the Office 
ofPublic Safety at 393-2111. 



Proposed 1-80 toil passes state legislature, needs federal approval 




Interstate 1-80 is used by University students and memoers ot ine community and couia oe one 
of the new highways with tollbo oths. (The Clarion Call/ Andy Lander). 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmrichard@clarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 9 - The 
Pennsylvania Turnpike 
Commission has proposed to 
toll Interstate 80 (1-80) in 



order to generate revenue. 

This proposition has cre- 
ated much controversy in 
the surrounding communi- 
ties, including Clarion. 

As it stands, the only cur- 
rent toll located on 1-80 in 
Pennsylvania is at the 



Delaware Water Gap 
Bridge, located between 
Pennsylvania and New 
Jersey. 

The toll proposal, Act 
44, plans for ten tollbooths 
to be created ' along 
Pennsylvania's 1-80. Act 44 



doesn't just include creating 
new tolls; the proposed plan 
also includes raising the 
prices of preexisting tolls in 
Pennsylvania. 

All of this tolling is 
going to generate revenue 
that some officials believe 
the state needs. 

Allen Biehler, the 
Secretary of Transportation 
for the Pennsylvania 
Department of 

Transportation (PennDOT), 
said that the revenue gener- 
ated from Act 44 will go to 
improving the quality of 
transportation in 

Pennsylvania. 

"The funding will repair 
highways and bridges as 
well as provide funding for 
public transportation and 
help improve state infra- 
structure," Biehler said. 

He also said he feels 
that the toll will help to 
repair Pennsylvania's roads 
and improve transportation 
for the state. Additional 
public transportation sys- 
tems are also in the works 
with the money that could 
be generated by Act 44. 



However, not everyone 
agrees with Biehler 's stance 
on the subject. 

The Clarion Area 
Chamber of Business and 
Industry is currently look- 
ing for members to join the 
"Stop 1-80 Toll Committee." 

A representative for the 
"Stop 1-80 Toll Committee" 
was unavailable for com- 
ment, but issued a state- 
ment regarding its negative 
view of Act 44. 

"We need to assure our 
opinion is known by state 
government about the nega- 
tive economic impact to 
future development in our 
region, the economic and 
financial impact on our 
manufacturers in Clarion 
and surrounding counties, 
the impact of increased com- 
mercial traffic on our toll- 
free highways through our 
communities, funds from 
the tolls that undoubtedly 
will be sent onto mass tran- 
sit authorities and not pro- 
viding sufficient funds to 
maintain 1-80 or the local 
roadways that will suffer 
increased traffic due to this 



measure," said Chamber 
Executive Director, lYacy 
Becker. 

The committee is plan- 
ning on organizing a public 
discussion breakfast with 
state legislators as well as 
organizing petition stations 
during the National City 
Autumn Leaf Festival. 

According to Biehler, Act 
44 has passed state legisla- 
ture but still needs federal 
approval. 

In the instance that the 
toll would be approved, com- 
munity members may not 
actually vsee it for several 
years. 

At the moment, the tolls 
for Pennsylvania's 1-80 
would not be expected to 
begin operation until 2010. 
There are plans to research 
Interstate 80 throughout 
2008 to find suitable and 
practical locations for what 
is anticipated to be ten elec- 
tronic tolls. 

Construction would not be 
set to begin until 2009 and 
the toll would be expected 
to be in full operation the 
following year. 



Page 2 



Tlffi CLAMOK CALL 



September 13. 2007 



Im 



Clarion University goes "green 



Lacey Lichvar 
Clarion Call Staff Wrrter 

S_ldlichvarOclarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 9 - The 
University recently won a 
$163,996 grant wiiidi will 
be Bsed to include a com- 
bined heat and power sys- 
tenn in the plans for the new 
Science and Technology 
Center. 

This will be the first 
"green" building osn campus, 
which means it is energy 
efficient. 

Dr. Joshua Pearce of 
the Physics department is 
heading this project, as he 
wrote the grants for the 
project and worked with 
students in his energy of 
physics and the environ- 
ment course to come up 
with the best design for the 
building. 

The students compiled 
various "green features" 
they thought would work 
well in the Science and 
Technology Center. Many 
of these ideas are to be used 
in the building, such as a 
roof that collects rainwater. 

Clarion University stu- 
dent Heather Zielonka con- 
ducted an energy audit of 
the current science center 
as well as a plug load analy- 
sis in order to determine 
how much energy was being 
used in each room. This 
information aided the engi- 
neers in optimizing the 
energy use in the new 
building. 



Pearce said he believes 
that it is not difficult to 
help the environment. All it 
takes is the combination of 
common sense and really 
thinking about what could 
help. 

According to Pearce, 
the building will house a 
solar powered rooftop. It 
will be embedded with pho- 
tovoltaic cells that will 
transform rays from the 
sun into electricity that will 
be used all over the new 
building. 

The cells create 35,000 
kw hrs/year of renewable 
solar energy; eliminate over 
14 tons of carbon dioxide 
emissions and save 22,000 
gallons of water and 14 tons 
of coal. 

Pearce said this infor- 
mation will be monitored 
and displayed for students 
to use in their studies. 

Working with the roof 
to provide the building with 
power will be a micro-tur- 
bine. This is essentially a 
small jet engine and it is a 
Combined Heat and Power, 
or CHP, system, which runs 
on natural gas. This gives 
an 80 percent efficacy com- 
pared to the 33 percent 
from traditional systems. 

According to the 
University's Distributed 
Energy Web site, '"tradition- 
al systems release heat into 
the environment as a 
byproduct while a CHP sys- 
tem captures heat and re- 
uses it." 

Pearce said, 'This will 



not only reduce the environ- 
mental impact of the build- 
ing, but win also Mve the 
university a lot of money m 
heating costs," 

Other aspects of the 
building that are energy 
efficient include waterless 
urinals, efficient windows 
and peelup carpet tiles. 
The carpet tiles are put 
down individually and are 
removable. 

This will save from hav- 
ing to tear up an entire car- 
pet in the case that it 
becomes worn or is stained. 
Instead only the sections of 
carpet that need replaced 
will have to be peeled up 
preventing waste. 

Rainwater from the roof 
will be used to flush urixials 
as well as labs. In addition, 
materials from the old sci- 
ence center will be re-used 
in the construction of the 
new one. 

All of these design 
aspects, and many others, 
are scoring major points 
with Leadership in Energy 
and Environmental Design 
(LEED). This is the organi- 
zation that determines if a 
building is "green," how 
"green" it is and, ultimately, 
if it is certifiable. 

According to the US 
Green Building Council, 
they consider five compo- 
nents : substantial site 
development, water sav- 
ings, energy efficiency, 
materials and indoor emi- 
ronmental quality. 

They are rated by giv- 



ing out "green points" 
w^hich determine which 
level of (^rtification a build- 
ing will receive. 

The levda are (^rtified 
by silver, gold and plat- 
inum. Pearce said that with 
the Science and Tfechnolog)' 
Center they were going for 
silver, which is reputable. 

However, as it stands 
now, they have tentatively 
racked up enough points to 
be in the gold level. They 
will not know the official 
certification until the build- 
ing is completed. 

Garion is among the 
leading universities in the 
country to have a certified 
science center and may 
become the first in the 
vState. 

With President 

Grunenwald's guidance, the 
university wiU work to have 
all it's future buildings 
LEED citified. 

Dave T&meo of Student 
and University Affairs is 
working with the new din- 
ning hall project and a resi- 
dence hall suite project 

He said that they are 
working to have these 
buildings certified at the 
silver level. 

Pearce said 

"Ultimately, I want to see 
every Clarion University 
student walk ofi' this cam- 
pus knowing what these 
systems [solar photovoltaic 
and CHP] are and how to 
use them to help the envi- 
ronment in his or her future 
job or home." 







m Aufust 31, at t-M %.m., Kathryn Oxk, W of^ 
Ku^Jw, Pa WIU ismimi a citation tm uadera^ cchh- 
mvBf^MEk vitite Uitmmty Police were on a ibeft; 
mimii3^tmn at Hair KaU. j 

m Augtart; ^, at W4B a.m., Aubrey Griffin, 22 <^ 
Clai^moi, Pa waa &ttes^&d by Vmmml^ Piolioe atd ai 
^te ixm^hk m a warrairt mm^ ^ mm^md 

Bouroui^ VtAxss D^mztment. 

fli August 30, at r>40 p.m., a ^udent repcMod an 
wsioiowm indUvMiiai |pr«JiAed her 1^ the arm a^ 
ed mppra^ia^ tihii^ to her as sb« wm waUcng 
wmr Harvey HaU. tl^ iEu:ident remains uidbr 
invedgaftaim. I 

m August 29, at S p.m., Viai^G»a Ortiz, 18, <^ 
J^dSMstm, MA «»$ arxi^frted i»r ik&uat^ t^^ 
btk0^ ia^ftd at Eeinhard Villi^iea ^et besmg, toM %^ 
s^SMH^i^toleavetheimni^yonAugui^m \ 

m Augurt 26, at 4:38 pan., a vehicle that was pazis^ 
at the 3CMM) Mbck d'&ai^urd ViUai^ mm 4mms^ 
Anj/idiie wHli ti^ofmalion is askdi to oo^itact INbfo 



■ A^furt 14, at 12^ p.m., Univemty V^im wwm 
called to ixivmii$&te tib« r^K>rt of a female a^kl^i 
being haras£%d by a kneirn individual. 



Clarion University ieads state system in accreditations 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjeerickson@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. lU - 
Clarion University is the 
leader in accreditations for 
state institutions of higher 
education, with 27 accredit- 
ed programs. 

Accreditation is a self- 
regulation and peer review 
that is done by the educa- 
tional community. The 
process of accrediting is 
used to strengthen and con- 
tinue the quality and 
integrity of education. It 
helps universities gain pub- 
lic confidence. 

Clarion University has 
been a part of the Middle 
State Commission on 
Higher Education since 
1948. Out of Clarion's 27 
accreditations, one third are 
accredited by the Middle 
State Commission on 
Higher Education. 

The nine accreditors 
approved by the U.S. 
Secretary of Education are^ 
American Bar Association 
(ABA), Section on Legal 




Construction on the new science and technolo^ center will begin with the next mont/i and the 
new building will be 98,000 square feet (The Clarion Call/ Jessica Lasher). 



Education and Admission to 
the Bar; American Library 
Association(ALA); American 
Speech-Language-Hearing 
Association(ASHA); 



Association of Collegiate 
Business Schools and 
Programs (ACBSP); Joint 
Review Committee on 
Education Radiologic 



Technology (JRCERT); 
National Association of 
Schools of Music (NASM); 
National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher 



Education(NCATE); 
National League for 
Nursing (NLN); National 
Association of Schools of Art 
and Design (NASAD). 

Besides being accredited 
by the Middle State 
Commission on Higher 
Education, Clarion's pro- 
grams are also accredited by 
the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher 
Education and the National 
Academy of Early Childhood 
Programs. For the chem- 
istry program Clarion is 
accredited by the National 
Chemical Society. 

The accreditations that 
Clarion has received do not 
just apply to the main cam- 
pus. They also apply to the 
branch campus, additional 
locations and other instruc- 
tional sites that offer parts 
of programs and distance 
learning. Locations where 
the accreditations apply are 
the Venango Campus in Oil 
City, and to programs 
offered through courses at 
West Penn School of 
Nursing in Pittsburgh, 
Dixon Center in Harrisburg, 



Meadville Medical Center, 
and Philadelphia Free 
Library. 

The University's Keeling 
Health Center is accredited 
by the Accreditation 
Association for Ambulatory 
Health Care (AAAHC). 
"Accreditation underscores 
out long-standing commit- 
ment to providing the high- 
est possible levels of quality 
care to the community we 
serve," said administrative 
director of health services 
Susan Bornak. "We are 
pleased and proud to have 
our efforts recognized with 
this accreditation." 

The Clarion University 
Department of Art is anoth- 
er one of the programs that 
has received accreditations, 
"This is a way to add 
emphasis to our program," 
said art department chair 
Gary Greenberg. "It also 
validates what we are doing 
and what our approach has 
been. It is a good stamp of 
approval and places Clarion 
on a par with other arc pro- 
grams nationally." 



"CONSTRUCTION" 
continued from front 
page. 

"As of yet, no contracts 
have been awarded for the 
construction on the new res- 
ident halls," said Dave 
Tomeo, associate vice presi- 
dent of Student and 
University Affairs. 

According to Tomeo, a 
contract has been awarded, 
however, for a new. much 
smaller and more cost effi- 
cient dining hall. 

The new 31,000 square 
foot dining facility will 
replace the current 48,000 
square foot. Chandler 
Dining Hall that is used to 
only half of its capacity. The 



new state of the art dining 
hall, designed by STV 
Architects of Douglassville 
wjll accommodate approxi- 
mately 545 people. 

The new dining hall, 
funded through the State 
Higher Education Bonds is 
to be repaid through stu- 
dent fees and meal plans. 

"Work on the new din- 
ing hall is slated to begin 
sometime in mid-October," 
Tomeo said. " Gemmell Park 
will be relocated behind 
Carlson Library on the cor- 
ner of Wood Street and 
Greenville Avenue in order 
to make way for the new 
Dining Hall. 

Parking has also under- 
gone some change due to 



constrution. 

"Although parking is 
tight right now," said Dave 
Tomeo, "the student parking 
situation is as bad as it's 
going to get." 

Employee parking will 
see changes, however when 
demolition of the old 
Campbell Resident Hall and 
the construction on the new 
Dining Hall begins some- 
time in mid October. 

"The good news." said 
Tomeo, " is that with the 
demolition of the old 
Campbell Residents Hall, 
there will, tentatively, be 
174 new parking spaces 
made available to help ease 
the current parking situa- 
tion." 



Clarion University impiements new 
parlcing assignments across campus 



Philip Wass 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_pgwass@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 10 - Due 
to construction. Clarion 
University has implented 
changes in the parking 
assignments this year. 

"Lot 11 has gone back to 
an all student parking lot 
and the parking lot next to 
Marwick-Boyd has become 
an all employee parking 
lot." said Associate Vice 
President of University and 
Academic Affairs. "I could 
see where there could be 



\ 



some confusion." 

Lots that students are 
permitted to park in are as 
follows^ Lots three, four, five 
and lot "P" are for residence 
hall students and lots four, 
five, six, nine, eleven, 
twelve, fourteen, fifteen and 
lot "B" are for commuter 
students. 

Lastly the employee 
lots, where students should 
not park, are lots: "D." "E," 
"F," "G," "H," "L," "M," "N." 
"0," "R," "S," 'T," "U," "X," 
"Z." 

All "freshman" parking 
can be found in lot three 



which is the parking lot 
down over the steep hill just 
below Wilkinson Hall and 
Nair Hall. 

All the parking lots 
around campus require 
some type of parking permit 
which can be obtained 
online at http7/www.clari- 
on.edu/admin/parking/index 
.shtml or at the Public 
Safety office located next to 
Becker Hall. 

For those who choose 
free parking, they may park 
at the football stadium, near 
the end of Main Street. 



Page 3 



jm CLAfilON CAUL 



September 13, 2007 



liliiu 



Welcome back Clarion University students 




Dr. Mary Hill-Wagner 
Adviser 



Welcome back to Clarion 
after a much deserved rest! 
Faculty, students and staff 
work very hard to make the 
institution work. Kvery 
summer there i.s a time for 
refloilion and rejuvenation. 
This message is just to let 
you know what's new in the 
Clarion Call this year. 

What's new? Well, I am. 

I'm the adviser for the 
student newspaper What's 
an adviser? According to the 



paper's hylaw.s, the adviser 
is charged with offering 
sound journalistic advice. 
After 15 years as a profes- 
sional journali.st and editor, 
I am qualified to do so. 

Further, the adviser 
much be alert to errors in 
stories. Also, the adviser has 
the privilege of criticizing 
the paper, so that it main- 
tains high standards of 
excellence. 

I would not dream of 



being a censor The rights of 
all journalists are worthy (if 
reverence. 

Ultimately, the paper i> 
under control of the stu 
dents. So, let the Clarion 
Call know what you think. 
Send the paper your stor,\ 
ideas. eomment.s or ques 
tions. We want to hear from 
vou. 



Hey you! Quit being so clieap! 



T 




Lindsay Grystar 
Editor-in-Chief 

s_llgrystaf@clafion.edu 



Maybe you had that 
exciting summer job where 
you had a fabulous summer 
living at the beach or your 
dream internship. However, 
if you are like the rest of us, 
you were stuck at the typi- 
cal summer job just trying 
to make some money to 
return to .school with. In my 
case, I was a server at a 
restaurant called Garfields. 

I came back to_ school 
w^ith one conclusion about 

"lii .auniBifr JQh;,,, .t;vjt'.ryfliiia- 
needs to work in the food 
i industry for one month. 
Working at a restaurant for 
a year has taught me more 
than I ever thought 1 could 
learn from a summer job. 

First of all, do you have 
any idea what the minimum 
wage is for waitresses is in 
Pennsylvania? $2.83. So, if 
you aren't tipping waitress- 
es enough, they are going 
home with absolutely noth- 
ing. Sometimes 1 just want 
to look at a customer and 
say, "are you aware your 



tips are paymg my bills?" 
Some people have absolute- 
ly no idea and desperately 
need to take an etiquette 
class in tipping. 

One incident happened 
over the summer while I 
was serving tables in the 
smoking section. Typically, 
smokers hold the stereotype 
of tipping less than non- 
smokers, plus they sit at 
their tables longer because 
they aren't in a rush to leave 
quickly. On this particular 
day, two of my friends that 
were cooks at the restaurant 
had just finished working 
and decided to sit at the bar 
to have a drink. I was chat- 
ting with them until I final- 
ly got a table. 1 was excited 
and was also determined to 
make some money. After 
walking up to the table and 
getting their drinks, my 
friends at the bar turned to 
me and said "That table is 
going to leave you less than 
two dollars." I just respond- 

,aiiLjftiitlL..','Wovv„.lliank,.>:QU., 
both for having faith in me." 
They just laughed and said, 
"You'll see." After dropping 
off their bill at the table, I 
waited for them to pay and 
remained pretty hopeful. 
They were two nice ladies so 
1 was hoping to prove my 
friends wrong. I opened the 
book, and was shocked. It 
turns out they shared a 
meal so their bill was only 
$10.05. They left me $10.10. 
Five cents. Really, thank 
you... I'll be sure to pay for 
college with that. My friends 



continue to laugh about that 
day and now play the "how- 
much money will Lindsay 
make off this table" game as 
often as they can. Jerks. 

After nights like these 
my co-workers have decided 
maybe we would be better 
off to just start selling our 
organs to get through col- 
lege. I'm starting to think 
that is my best option. Let 
me share another story. 

1 had a table in the 
smoking section, yet again, 
but this time on a busy 
Saturday afternoon. I was 
working a double, so 1 was 
there from 11:30 a.m. to 11 
p.m. It was right in the mid- 
dle of the day, and it was my 
last table before I got to take 
a break. Two 23 year old 
boys came in, and 1 was 
pretty excited. They were 
really nice and talkative 
and their check was getting 
very pricey so I was hoping 
to come away with a good 
I tip. Both boys had two 
,1 drinks from the bar, an 
appetizer," steak and ribs, 
and had ordered dessert. 
When 1 came back with 
their dessert, however, they 
were gone. I walked up to 
the hostess and asked her if 
she had seen them leave or 
suggested maybe they were 
in the bathroom. No such 
luck. They had walked out, 
and left me with their $64 
check. They had set me up, 
and 1 fell for it. 1 was furi- 
ous. I vowed that if I ever 
saw those two boys again 
that I would scream at them 




and demand back my $64 
for their meal. 1 still hold 
that promise. 

If you have worked in 
the food industry, you know 
exactly what 1 am talking 
about. It is the worst feeling 
in the world when you know 
you did a really good job 
with a table and walk away 
with a ]0"i) tip. Another 
thing that bothers waitress- 
es is when you use a coupon. 
The amount of work that 
waitress did is not less 
because you are paying less. 
Figure out your tip based on 
the regular price of the 
entree. 

So next time [f^ou are out ' 
at a restaurant and are fig- 
uring out the tip, just 
remember that waitressing 
is much harder than you 
think. You would have a 
much better appreciation for 
working in the food industry 
if you would actually try it 
yourself. Just remember^ 
$2,83 an hour. 

The author is a junior mass 
media arts and journalism 
major and the Editor-in- 
Chief of The Call. 



To catch a senator 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

s_zhause@clarion.edu 



"All suspects are inno- 
cent until proven guilty"' is a 
pretty good standard to go 
by in the greatest country 
on earth. At least on 
Dragnet, they made it seem 
that way Today it seems 
that the powerful can tailor 
the rules and traditions to 
their own needs. Maybe 
pleading guilty in a case 
does not mean that the per- 
son is actually guilty. Take 
for example recently ostra- 
cized Senator Larry Craig 
(R-ID). He always seemed 
like a stand up guy, at least 
until he sat down in the 
Minneapolis airport on that 
fateful June afternoon. For 
those who have not heard 
about the most recent GOP 
nightmare. Senator Craig 
has been accused of solicit- 
ing sex from an undercover 
police officer at the 
Minnesota Airport. Perhaps 
more interesting about the 
charge was that Craig actu- 
ally plead guilty when he 
was taken in front of the 
judge. At twenty-two years 
old, I might be a Httle bit old 
fashioned for my age. but I 
am no stranger to coinciden- 



tal happenings. However, to 
me, when someone is 
accused of lewd activity in a 
place that is being investi- 
gated for lewd activity and 
then pleads guilty to the 
charge in hopes of a lesser 
sentence, it is usually a good 
indication of guilt. 

Senator Craig held a 
press conference more than 
two months later explaining 
that he "was not gay" and 
has "never been gay." For 
many people who had been 
suspicious of Craig's sexual- 
ity, this comes as a bit of a 
shock. His past has been 
riddled with a number of 
accusations concerning his 
preference for late night 
romps around the corn silo 
under the stars with male 
companions. But it seems 
that now he prefers the 
romantic setting of an air- 
port bathroom stall. Who 
could blame him? With all of 
those insightful words and 
pictures carved into the 
doors of the stalls, how- 
could anyone resist a little 
afternoon delight? 

He addressed these 
other charges of homosexual 
behavior and claimed that 
they were the tactics done 
via witch hunt by The Idaho 
Statesman, the newspaper 
that had been receiving sev- 



eral stories about the con- 
servative senator's hypocrit- 
ical actions. The paper 
claimed that this was not a 
witch hunt. They were 
merely responding to allega- 
tions brought forth by sever- 
al sources and witnesses, 
including "three very credi- 
ble" sources. Ever\'one loves 
a witch hunt, it lets them 
focus on someone else's per- 
sonal failures more impor- 
tantly, it creates a bandwag- 
on of rhetoric for everyone to 
ride. 

This sounds familiar, 
but where have we seen this 
before? Perhaps this quote 
will ring a bell for everyone. 
" I'm going to speak for the 
citizens of my state, who in 
the majority think that Bill 
Clinton is probably even a 
nasty, bad, naughty boy," 
This is of course Larry Craig 
talking with Tim Russert 
about Bill Clinton's sex 
scandal with Monica 
Lewinsky, Well, Monica 
Lewinski may not have been 
the slimmest or prettiest of 
gals, but at least this 
encounter happened in 
somewhat sanitary condi- 
tions (I mean, in the Oval 
Office, is there really any 
better place?). Mr Craig is 
probably asking himself 
that "if Bill CUnton is a 



"nasty, bad. naughty boy', 
then what am 1?" Well. Mr. 
Craig, it is simple: You are a 
cowardly hypocrite with no 
sense of reality or morals 
that you claim to defend. 
You aligned yourself with 
the most conservative sen- 
tors to alienate not only 
BillClinton as a "nasty, bad. 
naughty boy" but also, more 
recently the proposcjd con- 
stitutional amendment to 
ban gay marriage. This 
illustrates your hypocrisy, 
inability to decipher right 
from wrong and more 
importantly, your inability 
to represent those who 
voted for you. 

Regai'dless of someone's 
opinion on Bill Clinton, or 
homosexuality it is quite 
clear that even the most 
naive person in the world 
has to concede that Senator 
Craig lied. Craig now claims 
that he did not tell his fami- 
ly, staff, fellow senators or 
constituents about his lusty 
arrest because he wanted to 
protect his family and fellow 
GOP members from the 
embarrassment that would 
ultimately ensue. While this 
may be true, he is still cov- 
ering up his own motive^ he 
wants his name to be 
cleared and to avoid this 
humiliating experience. 



KililiiriiiUiHIm III llii^jliliHiinil ly on ta 



270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 



Phone: 814-393-2380 
Web: clarion.edu/thecall 



Fax:814-393-2557 
E-mail: call@clarion.edu 



Executive Board 
2007-2008 



Lindsay Grystar, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hill-Wagner 
Adviser 



Staff 
News: Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Gretchen Bethyori, 
Jamie Richard, Donald Baum Entertainment: Amy Powers, 
Amber Stockholm, Joey Pettine, John Buffone, Travis Lear, 
Rachella Votlant-Barle Spodg: Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer. Jordan Scltchfield Copy Editing: Jllllan Walmer 
Features; Rob Miller, Gregg Bandzuh Advertising : Douglas 
Gisewhite, Aaron Swaniek Photography and Graphics: 
Jenifer Poblete, Dominic DeAngelo, Adam Huff, Sean 
Montgomery, Stefanie Jula, Andy Lander, Daria Kurnal, 
Jessica Lasher 



Policies 

2|i^ Clarion Call is t|e student-run newspaper of Claripn.- 
University Of Pennsylvania and the'surrounding communities. Tl^e*'' 
Call is published most Ttiursdays during ttie academic year. 

Ttie Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the rigtit to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity: ttie determination of wtiich is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, ttiey must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion, One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 



■ Opinions expressed in tliis publication 
are those of the writer or speaker, and do 
not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
newspaper staff, student body, Clarion 
University or the community. 



Just a lew days ago, 
uncle)- the advice of Arlen 
Specter (R-PA). Mr. Craig 
said that he would not 
resign if his attorney Billy 
Martin, Michael Vick's 
attorney in the dog fighting 
debacle, could get his guilty 
plea reversed and the judg- 
ment to be overturned. Well 
now we've seen it all. The 
man has plead guilty, denied 
the charges, clanned that he 
would resign on September 
30, but now maintains inno- 
cence and will fight the 
charges so that his name 
may be cleared and he will 
remain in his senatorial 
seat. Personally. I am an 
Arlen Specter fan and 
believe that he one of the 
soundest voices in our entire 
political system, but even 
his advice might not save 
Craig's career and reputa- 
tion among his core con- 
stituency of being an honest 
man... and a complete 
homophobe. 

Bill Clinton might have 
been wrong in the eves of 



some people, but it was ulti- 
mately the hype that had 
everyone riled up during 
that escapade. After all, 
when Clinton left office, his 
approval ratings were 
among the highest of any 
outgoing president. So 
maybe there is hope for him 
after all. We all know how 
patient the GOP is towards 
failures and short comings 
concerning homosexual 
acts, just ask former con- 
gressman Mark Foley. 

So when the dust clears 
and Larry Craig is no longer 
a senator, do not feel bad for 
him. He will be taken care of 
by the American people like 
they take care of everyone 
else who fades from the 
limelight. While they still 
might not vote for him. they 
will cheer hke Hell when he 
is squaring off against Newt 
Gingrich on the next edition 
of Celebrity Boxing 



Page 2 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



lews 



September 13. 2007 



Page 3 



Clarion University goes ''green 



Lacey Lichvar 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_lcllichvar®ciarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 9 - The 
University recently won a 
$163,996 grant which will 
be used to include a com- 
bined heat and power sys- 
tem in the plans for the new 
Science and Technology 
Center. 

This will be the first 
"green" building on campus, 
which means it is energ>' 
efficient. 

Dr. Joshua Pearce of 
the Physics department is 
heading this project, as he 
wrote the grants for the 
project and worked with 
students in his energy of 
physics and the environ- 
ment course to come up 
with the best design for the 
building. 

The students compiled 
various "green features" 
they thought would work 
well m the Science and 
Technolog>' Center. Many 
of these ideas are to be used 
in the building, such as a 
roof that collects rainwater. 

Clarion University stu- 
dent Heather Zielonka con- 
ducted an energy audit of 
the current science center 
as well as a plug load analy- 
sis in order to determine 
how much energy was being 
used in each room. This 
information aided the engi- 
neers in optimizing the 
energy use in the new 
building. 



Pearce said he believes 
that it is not difficult to 
help the environment. All it 
takes is the combination of 
common sense and really 
thinking about what could 
help. 

According to Pearce. 
the building will house a 
solar powered rooftop. It 
will be embedded with pho- 
tovoltaic cells that will 
transform rays from the 
sun into electricity that will 
be used all over the new 
building. 

The cells create 35,000 
kw hr.s/year of renewable 
solar energ>': eliminate over 
14 tons of carbon dioxide 
emissions and save 22,000 
gallons of water and 14 tons 
ol' coal . 

Pearce said this infor- 
mation will be monitored 
and displayed for students 
to use in their studies. 

Working with the roof 
to provide the building with 
power will be a micro-tur- 
bine. This is essentially a 
small jet engine and it is a 
Combined Heat and Power, 
or CHP, system, which runs 
on natural gas. This gives 
an 80 percent efficacy com- 
pared to the 33 percent 
from traditional systems. 

According to the 
University's Distributed 
Energy Web site, "tradition- 
al systems release heat into 
the environment as a 
byproduct while a CHP sys- 
tem captures heat and re- 
uses it." 

Pearce said, "This will 



not only reduce the environ- 
mental impact of the build- 
ing, but will also save the 
university a lot of money in 
heating costs." 

Other aspects of the 
building that are energy 
efficient include waterless 
urinals, efficient windows 
and peel-up carpet tiles. 
The carpet tiles are put 
down individually and are 
removable. 

This will save from hav- 
ing to tear up an entire car- 
pet in the case that it 
becomes worn or is stained. 
Instead only the sections of 
carpet that need replaced 
will have to be peeled up 
preventing waste. 

Rainwater from the roof 
will be used to flush urinals 
as well as labs. In addition, 
materials from the old sci- 
ence center will be re-used 
in the construction of the 
new one. 

All of these design 
aspects, and many others, 
are scoring major points 
with Leadership in Energy 
and Environmental Design 
(LEED). This is the organi- 
zation that determines if a 
building is "green," how 
"green" it is and, ultimately 
if it is certifiable. 

According to the US 
Green Building Council, 
they consider five compo- 
nents: substantial site 
development, water sav- 
ings, energy efficiency, 
materials and indoor envi- 
ronmental quality 

They are rated by giv- 



ing out "green points" 
which determine which 
level of certification a build- 
ing will receive. 

The levels are certified 
by silver, gold and plat- 
inum. Pearce said that with 
the Science and Technology 
Center they were going for 
silver, which is reputable. 

However, as it stands 
now, they have tentatively 
racked up enough points to 
be in the gold level. They 
will not know the official 
certification until the build- 
ing is completed. 

Clarion is among the 
leading universities in the 
country to have a certified 
science center and may 
become the first in the 
state. 

With President 

Grunenwald's guidance, the 
university will work to have 
all it's future buildings 
LEED certified. 

Dave Tomeo of Student 
and University Affairs is 
working with the new din- 
ning hall project and a resi- 
dence hall suite project. 

He said that they are 
working to have these 
buildings certified at the 
silver level. 

Pearce said 

"Ultimately, 1 want to see 
every Clarion University 
student walk off this cam- 
pus knowing what these 
systems [solar photovoltaic 
and CHPJ are and how to 
use them to help the envi- 
ronment in his or her future 
job or home." 





Tlie Qarkm CeJl provides a syiu^isiB of all 
in^^estigatioiui as ocHidiKstod l:^ C3arkm Urn 
Public Safety kat the mmih (tf August 2007. AU 
mkamatixm can be accessed on the Publk 
WebiMge. 

■ August 31, at 2:54 a.m., Kathryn Cook, 20 erf 
Butler, Pa was issued a citation for underage con- 
sumption while University Police were on a theft 
investigation at Nair Hall. 

■ August 30, at 10:45 a.m., Aubrey Griffin, 22 <rf 
Clarion, Pa was arreted by University Police and a 
state constable on a warrant issued by Magisla^te 
Quinn for harassment on charges from the Clarion 
Bourough Police Department. 

■ August 30, at 1:40 p.m., a student reported an 
unknown individual grabbed her by the arm and stat- 
ed inappropriate things to her as she was walking 
near Harvey Hall. The incident remains under 
invesigation, 

■ August 29, at 5 p.m., 'V^anessa Ortiz, 18, of 
Jefferson, MA was arrested for defiant trespass after i 
being found at Reinhard Villages after being told by 
staff members to leave the property on August 28. 

■ August 26, at 4:38 p.m., a vehicle that was parked 
at the 3000 block of Reinhard Villages was damaged. 
Anyone with information is asked to contact Public 
Safety. 

■ August 14, at 12:05 p.m.. University Police were 
called to investigate the report of a female student 
being harassed by a known individual. 



Clarion University leads state system in accreditations 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjeerickson@clarion,edLi 

CLARION, Sept. 10 ~ 
Clarion University is the 
leader in accreditations for 
state institutions of higher 
education, with 27 accredit- 
ed programs. 

Accreditation is a self- 
regulation and peer review 
that is done by the educa- 
tional community. The 
process of accrediting is 
used to strengthen and con- 
tinue the quality and 
integrity' of education. It 
helps universities gain pub- 
lic confidence. 

Clarion University has 
been a part of the Middle 
State Commission on 
Higher Education since 
1948. Out of Clarions 27 
accreditations, one third are 
accredited by the Middle 
State Commission on 
Higher Education. 

The nine accreditors 
approved by the U.S. 
Secretary of Education are: 
American Bar Association 
(ABA). Section on Legal 




Construction on the new science and technology center will begin 
new building will be 98,000 square feet (The Clarion Call/ Jessica 



Education and Admission to 
the Bar; American Library 
Association(ALA); American 
Speech-Language-Hearing 
A s s o c i a t i n ( A S H A ) : 



Association of Collegiate 
Business Schools and 
Programs (ACBSP); Joint 
Review Committee on 
Education Radiologic 



with the next nnonth and the 
Lasher). 

Technology (JRCERT): 
National Association of 
Schools of Music (NASM): 
National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher 



E due at ion (NC ATE); 
National League for 
Nursing (NLN); National 
Association of Schools of Art 
and Design (NASAD). 

Besides being accredited 
by the Middle State 
Commission on Higher 
Education. Clarion's pro- 
grams are also accredited by 
the National Council for 
Accreditation of Teacher 
Education and the National 
Academy of Early Childhood 
Programs. For the chem- 
istry program Clarion is 
accredited by the National 
Chemical Society. 

The accreditations that 
Clarion has received do not 
just apply to the main cam- 
pus. They also apply to the 
branch campus, additional 
locations and other instruc- 
tional sites that offer parts 
of programs and distance 
learning. Locations where 
the accreditations apply are 
the Venango Campus in Oil 
City, and to programs 
offered through courses at 
West Penn School of 
Nursing in Pittsburgh, 
Dixon Center in Harrisburg, 



Meadville Medical Center, 
and Philadelphia Free 
Library. 

The University's Keeling 
Health Center is accredited 
by the Accreditation 
Association for Ambulatory 
Health Care (MAHC). 
"Accreditation underscores 
out long-standing commit- 
ment to providmg the high- 
est possible levels of quality 
care to tlie community we 
serve," said administrative 
directoi- of health services 
Susan Bornak. "We are 
pleased and proud to have 
our efforts recognized with 
this accreditation." 

The Clarion University 
Department of Art is anoth- 
er one of the programs that 
has received accreditations. 
"This is a way to add 
emphasis to our program." 
said art department chair 
Gary Greenberg. "ft also 
validates what we are doing 
and what our approach has 
been. It is a good stamp of 
approval and places Clarion 
on a par with other art pro- 
grams nationally." 



"CONSTRUCTION" 
continued from front 
page. 

"As of yet. no contracts 
have been awarded for the 
construction on the new res- 
ident halls." said Dave 
Tomeo. associate vice presi- 
dent of Student and 
University Affairs. 

According to Tomeo, a 
contract has been awarded, 
however, for a new. much 
smaller and more cost effi- 
cient dining hall. 

The new 31,000 square 
foot dining facility will 
replace the current 48.000 
square foot. Chandler 
Dining Hall that is u.sed to 
only half of its capacity. The 



new state of the art dining 
hall, designed by STV 
Architects of Douglassville 
will accommodate approxi- 
mately 545 people. 

The new dining hall, 
funded through the State 
Higher Education Bonds is 
to be repaid thj-ough stu- 
dent fees and meal plans. 

"Work on the new din- 
ing hall is slated to begin 
sometime in mid-October." 
Tomeo said. " Gemmell Park 
will be relocated behind 
Carlson Library on the cor- 
ner of Wood Street and 
Greenville Avenue in order 
to make way for the new- 
Dining Hall. 

Parking has also under- 
gone some change due to 



constrution, 

"Although parking is 
tight right now," said Dave 
Tomeo, "the student parking 
situation is as bad as it's 
going to get." 

Employee parking will 
see changes, however when 
demolition of the old 
Campbell Resident Hall and 
the construction on the new- 
Dining Hall begins some- 
time in mid October. 

"The good news," said 
Tomeo, " is that with the 
demolition of the old 
Campbell Residents Hall, 
there will, tentatively be 
174 new parking spaces 
made available to help ease 
the current parknig situa- 
tion." 



Clarion University implements new 
parking assignments across campus 



Philip Wass 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_pgwass@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 10 - Due 
to construction, Clarion 
University has implented 
changes in the parking 
a.ssignments this year. 

"Lot 1 1 has gone back to 
an all student parking lot 
and the parking lot next to 
Marwick-Boyd has become 
an all employee parking 
lot." said Associate Vice 
President of University and 
Academic Affairs. "I could 
see where there could be 



some confusion." 

Lots that students are 
permitted to park in are as 
follows: Lots three, four, five 
and lot "P" are for residence 
hall students and lots four, 
five, six, nine, eleven, 
twelve, fourteen, fifteen and 
lot "B" are for commuter 
students. 

Lastly the employee 
lots, where students should 
not park, are lots: "D." "E." 
"F" "G," "H." "L," "M." "N." 
'•O.'" "R," "S," "T," 'U." "X," 
■Z." 

All "freshman" parking 
can be found in lot three 



which is the parking lot 
down over the steep hill just 
below Wilkinson Hall and 
Nair Hall. 

All the parking lots 
around campus require 
some type of parking permit 
which can be obtained 
online at http://www.clari- 
on.edu/admin/parking/index 
• shtml or at the Public 
Safety office located next to 
Becker Hall. 

For those who choose 
free parking, they may park 
at the football stadium, near 
the end of Main Street. 



THE CLARION CALL 



t/im 



September 13, 2007 



iiiii'iiiUj'llmliilliHjIiliii^iiiilli^^^ 



Welcome b ack Clarion University students 

UfKonu' liuck to ClariuM paper's bylaw.s. the adviser lu'ing a censor. The iiyhts of 




Dr. Mary Hill-Wagner 

Adviser 



iilicr a much deservt'd rest! 
Faculty, .students and staff 
work very hard to make the 
institutinii vvcirk. Every 
.suuunci' there is a time for 
rctlcction and rejuvenation. 
This message is just to let 
M)u know what's new in the 
< innoii Call this year. 

What's new? Well, T am. 

I'm the adviser for the 
student newspaper. What's 
an adviser? According to the 



is charged with ofleriug 
sound journalistic advice. 
.After 15 years as a profes- 
sional journali>t and cditdr. 
1 am qualified to do so. 

Further, the adviser 
much be alert to errors in 



all journalists are worthy of 
levereiire. 

intimately, the papiT ij, 
under control of the stu- 
dents. So. lei I lie ( 
Call know what \<m llnnk 
Send the paper ynur stdix 



THE CLARION CALL 



270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 



stories. Also, the adviser has idea.-, (nninienfs or ipie- 
ihe privilege of erifr i/iiig t ions. We want to hear IVuni 
the paper, so that it manr \,,u 
lains high stand;n-d> of 
excellence. 

1 would not dream of 



Hey you! Quit being so ciieap! 



Phone; 814-393-2380 
Web: clarion.edu/thecall 



Fax; 814-393-2557 
E-mail; call@clarlon.e(lu 



Executive Board 
2007-2008 




Lindsay Grystar 
Editor-in-Chief 



^_llgfVS!ar@c!arion.f;du 



Mayl)e you had that 
exciting summer job where 
you had a fabulous summer 
living at the beach or your 
ilreani internship. However, 
if >ou are like the rest of us, 
you were stuck at the typi- 
cal summer job just trying 
lo make some money to 
return ttj x'hool with. In my 
case, 1 was a server at a 
restaurant called Garfields. 

1 came hack to school 
v'^ith one conclusion about 

nUL.j?AJii«iit.'i' jabi„.w,:jui:wJiit\. 
needs to W()rk in the foo'd 
industry for one month. 
Working at a restaurant for 
a year has taught me more 
than 1 ever thcaight 1 could 
learn from a summer job. 

First of all, do you have 
any idea what the minimum 
wage IS for waitresses is in 
Pennsylvania? S2.8;i. 80, if 
you aren't tipping waitress- 
es enough, they are going 
hcane with absolutely noth- 
ing. Sometimes I just want 
to look at a customer and 
say, "are voii aware \'our 



tips are paying my bills?" 
Some people have ab.solute- 
ly no idea and desperately 
iH'vd to take an etiquette 
class in tipping. 

One incident happened 
over the summer while 1 
was serving tables in the 
smoking section. Typically, 
smokei-s hold the stereotype 
of tipping less than non- 
smokers, plus they sit at 
their tables longer because 
they aren't in a rush to leave 
quickly On this particular 
da.\-, two of my friends that 
were cooks at the restaurant 
had just finished working 
and decided to sit at the bar 
to have a drink. 1 was chat- 
ting with them until 1 final- 
ly got a table, I was e.Kcited 
and was also determined to 
make some money. .After 
walking up to the table and 
getting their (lrink>, my 
(ritHids at the bar turned to 
me and said "That table is 
going to leave >ou less than 
two dollars." 1 just respond" 
«WiL.witli.,."Wow., thank y;ou 
both for having faith in me." 
They just laughed and said, 
"You'll see." Alter dropping 
off their hill at the table, I 
waited lor them to pay and 
remained pretty ho]jt>ful. 
They were two nice ladies so 
1 was hoping to prove my 
friends wrong. 1 opened the 
hook, and was shocked. It 
turns out they shared a 
meal so their bill was only 
$10.05. They left me $10.10. 
Vwv cents. Ideally, thank 
you... I'll he sure to pa,\' for 
college with that. My friends 



continue to laugh about that 
day and now play the "how 
much money will Lindsay 
make off this table" game as 
often as they can. Jerks. 

.After nights like these 
my co-workers have decided 
maybe we would be better 
off to just start selling our 
organs to get through col- 
lege. I'm starting to think 
that is my best optU)n, Let 
me share another story. 

1 had a table in the 
smoking section, yet again, 
but this time on a bu.sy 
Saturday afternoon. 1 was 
working a double, so I was 
there from IVW a.m. to 11 
p.m. It was right in the mid- 
dle of the day and it was my 
last talile before I got to take 
a break. Two 21] year old 
boys came in. and 1 was 
pretty excited. They were 
really nice and talkative 
and their check was getting 
very pricey so 1 was hoping 
to come away with a good 
! tip. Both hoys had two 
drinks from the bar. an 
appetizer,'' steak and ribs, 
and had ordered dessert. 
When I came back wirh 
their dessert, however, the\ 
were gone. I walked up to 
the hostess and asked her if 
she had seen them leave or 
suggested maybe they were 
in the bathroom. No such 
luck. The>- had walked out, 
and left me with their $64 
check. They had set me up, 
and 1 fell for it. 1 was furi- 
ous. 1 vowed that if I e\er 
saw those two boys again 
that 1 w'ould scream at them 




and ilemand back ray .1^64 

for their meal. I MiW 'lold 
that promise. 

If \'ou hcwv worked in 
the food industi'v. vou know 
exactly what 1 am tnlkiny 
about. It IS the worst feeling 
in the world when nou know 
you did a ivallx- good job 
with a talile and walk ;iwa\ 
with a 10",, tip. ,Another 
thing that bothers waitress- 
es is when you use a coupon. 
The amount of work that 
waitress did is not less 
because nou are paying:;- less. 
Figure out your tip based on 
the regular price (if the 
entree. 

So next time you yie oui 
at a restaurant and are fig- 
uring out the tip. iust 
remember that waitressing 
IS much liarder than \ou 
think. You would ha\e a 
much better appreciation lor 
working in the food industr> 
if you would actuallv try it 
yourself, -lu^! remember: 
S2,S:j an hour 

The fiiithor is u junior inass 
/?/('(/;>( arts and jouni;tli>ni 
major :ind tiw Editor-\n- 
ri)ie/'o/' The Call, 



Lindsay Grystar, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler. 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards. 
Online Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hill-Wagner 
Adviser 



To catch a senator 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

5._.?!iause#ciririoii.eclu 



".All suspects are inno- 
fent until jiroven guilty" is a 
pretty good standard to go 
h>' in the greatest country 
on earth. At least on 
Dragnet, they made it seem 
that way. Today it seems 
that the powerful can tailor 
the rules and traditions to 
their own needs. Maybe 
pleading guilty in a case 
does not mean that the per- 
son is actually guiltw Take 
for example recently ostra- 
cized Senator Larrv Crais 
(R-II)). He always seemed 
like a stand up gu>-. at least 
until he sat down in the 
Minneapolis airjjort on that 
fateful -iune afternoon. For 
those who have not heard 
about the most recent OOP 
nightmare. Senator Craig 
has been accused of solicit- 
ing sex from an undercover 
pcdice officer at the 
Alinnesota Airport. Perhaps 
more interesting about the 
charge was that Craig actu- 
ally plead guilty when he 
was taken in front of the 
judge. At twenty-two years 
old. I might be a little hit old 
lashioned for my a.ye. hut 1 
am no straru/er in i',,in, i.lfn- 



tal happenings. However, to 
me, when someone is 
accused of lewd activity in a 
place that is being investi- 
gated for lewd activity and 
then pleads guilty to the 
charge in hopes of a lesser 
sentence, it is usually a good 
indication of guilt. 

Senator Craig held a 
press conference more than 
two months later explaining 
that he "was not gay" and 
has "never been gay." Yor 
many people who had been 
susjiicious of Craig's sexual- 
ity, this comes as a bit of a 
shock. His past has been 
riddled with a number of 
accusations concerning his 
preference for late night 
romi)s around the corn silo 
under the stars with male 
companions. But it seems 
that now he prefers the 
romantic setting of an air- 
port bathroom stall. Who 
could Idame him? With all of 
tho.se insightful words and 
pictures carved into the 
doors of the stalls, how 
could anyone resist a little 
afternoon delight? 

He addressed these 
other charges of homosexual 
behavior and claimed that 
they were the tactics done 
via witch hunt by The Idaho 
Statesman, the newspaper 
tlia! li.id lie'-n receiving sev- 



eral stories about the con- 
servative senator's hypocrit- 
ical actions. The paper 
claimed that this was not a 
witch hunt. They were 
merely responding to allega- 
tions brought forth by sever- 
al sources and witnesses, 
including "three very credi- 
ble" sources. Everyone loves 
a witch hunt, it lets them 
focus on someone else's per- 
sonal failures more impor- 
tantly, it creates a bandwag- 
on of rhetoric for everyone to 
ride. 

This sounds familiar, 
but where have we seen this 
before? l^erhaps this quote 
will ring a bell for everyone, 
■■ I'm going to speak for the 
citizens of my state, who in 
the majority think that P.1II 
Clinton is probably even a 
nasty, bad. naughty bov." 
This is of course I,.arry Craig 
talking with Tim Rus,sert 
about Bill Clinton's sex 
scandal with Monica 
Lewinsky W'ell, Monica 
Lewinski may not have been 
the slimmest or prettiest of 
gals, but at least this 
encounter happened in 
somewhat sanitary condi- 
tions (I mean, in the Oval 
Office, is there really any 
i)etter place?). Mr. Craig is 
probably asking himself 
that "if Bill Clinton 1^ ,■> 



Staff 

NgM; Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Gretchen Bethyorl, 
Jamie Richard, Donald Baum E nterta inment: Amy Powers, 
Amber Stockholm, Joey Pettine, John Buffone, Travis Lear, 
Rachella Vollant-Barle Sports: Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield Copy Idltlni: Jillian Walmer 
Features: Rob Miller. Gregg Bandzuh Advertising: Douglas 
Gisewhite, Aaron Swaniek Pho tograph y and Graphlpy; 
Jenifer Poblete, Dominic DeAngelo. Adam Huff, Sean 
Montgomery, Stefanie Jula, Andy Lander, Daria Kurnal, 
Jessica Lasher 



Policies 

Th^ Clarion Cai! is t(ie student run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is publistied most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from ail sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity: the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief, 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed, 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 



The 



r,^n 



'nasty, bad, naughtv l)o\-, 
then what am I?" Well, Mr. 
Craig, it is simple: You are a 
cowardly hypocrite with no 
sense of reality or morals 
that you claim to defend. 
You aligner! \oiii'selt' v,iih 
the most conservative mt,- 
tors to alienate not only 
BillClinton as a "nasty, had, 
naughty bov." but also, more 
recently the pniposed con- 
stitutional arneiidment to 
ban gay marria.m". This 
illustrates \oiir hypocris\. 
inability to decipher right 
from wrono and more 
importantlx, youi- inabilit\- 
to represent those who 
voted for you. 

Regardless of someone's 
opinion on Hill Clinton, or 
homosexuality it is quite 
clear that even the nio.-t 
naive peison m tlie world 
has to concede thai Senator 
Craig lied, Craig now claims 
that he iM not tell his fami- 
ly staff, fellow senators or 
constituents about his lusty 
arrest because he wanted to 
protect his family and fellow 
fJOP members from the 
embarrassment that would 
ultimately i-nsue. While this 
may be true, he is still cov- 
ering up his own motixe: he 
wants ' 
cleared 
humilia: 



s available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy IS free: additional copies are $1,00, 

■ Opinions expressed in this publication 
are those of the writer or speaker, and do 
not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
newspaper staff, student body, Clarion 
University or the community. 



■lust a few days ago, 
under the advice of Arlen 
Specter (R R\). M,-, Crai- 
sa.ul that he would not 
Vi'M'^n if hi.s atlornev Hilly 
Alartin. .Michael Vick's 
attorney in the dog lighting 
debacle, could get his guilty 
plea revei'sed and the juds- 
nieii! to be oviM'lurned. Well 
now we've seen it all. The 
man has [dead guiltv. deni«'d 
the charges, claimed that he 
Would resign on September 
oil. but now maintains inno- 
cence and will lleht tlu' 
charges so that his name 
may he cleared and he will 
remain in his senatorial 
seat, Per.scmally. I am an 
Arlen Specter fan and 
believe that he one oi" the 
soundest voices in our entire 
political .sy.stem. but even 
his advice might not .save 
Craig.s career and reputa- 
tion among his core con- 
stituency of being an honest 
man,., and a complete. 



.-^ome people, but it was ulti- 
mately the hype that had 
everyone riled up during 
that escapade. After all, 
when Clinton left office, his 
approval ratings were 
among the highest of any 
outgoing president. So 
maybe there is hope for him 
alter all. We all know how 
patient the GOP is towards 
(allures and short comings 
concerning homosexual 
acts, just ask former con- 
gressman Mark Foley 

So when the dust clears 
and Lai'ry Craig is no longer 
a senator do not feel bad for 
him. fie will be taken care of 
by the American people like 
they take care of everyone 
else who fades from the 
limelight. While they still 
might not vote for him. they 
will cheer like Hell when he 
is squaring off against Newt 
Gin^jrich on the next edition 
of Celebritv Boxing 



Page 4 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 13. 2007 



Feitms 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsband/uh@clarion.edu 

Daniel Kinkus. or 
"Rink" as most people know 
him, was born on May 23. 
1986. His hometown is 
Drums. Fa, just outsicle of 
Hazleton. 

Rinkus was a 2004 grad- 
uate of Hazleton High 
School. During his time 
there, he participated in 
cross country, track and 
swimming. Besides athlet- 
ics, he really enjoyed broad- 
casting. 

Originally choosing to 
come to (Marion University 
to be involved with the swim 
team. Rinkus' priorities led 
him to WCUB-TV. 

As a fi'eshman, he start- 
ed at the bottom of the bar- 
rel and worked his way up 
to the top. He started at 
WCUB-TV working as a 
reporter and news anchor 
before becoming the execu- 
tive producer for the dura- 
tion of his sophomore year. 

Also in his sophomore 
year, Rinkus and Matt 
Steinhiser hosted their own 
radio show together, called 
"The Happy Hour with 
Stein and Rink.'" They 
talked about sports, played 
music and did a little come- 
dy. He said he had a lot of 
fun in the process. This 
show was his first break 
into the radio industry. 

The following year, as a 
junior, Rinkus became sta- 







tion manager of WCUB-TV. 
For seven weeks this past 
summer, he helped renovate 
the station's control room. 

Along with being the TV 
station manager and a part- 
time director, Rinkus is a 
member of the National 
Broadcasting Societv and a 
deejayatWCUC-FM. 

Even though he spends 
most of his time in broad- 
casting, he is interested in 
other things. He played the 
trumpet for ten years and is 
also interested in sports. He 
follows almost all of the 
major sporting events in the 
world. His favorite NFL 
team is the New York 
Giants, his favorite MLB 
team is the Philadelphia 
Phillies and his favorite 



NHL team is the Pittsburgh 
Penguins. He is also a 
NASCAR fan. 

"Scrubs" tops the list of 
his favorite TV shows. He 
does not like to miss a single 
episode, if he can help it. He 
also likes listening to his 
favorite bands^ Guster, The 
Shins, Coldplay, Jack 
Johnson and Wilco. 

Rinkus enjoys going out 
on the weekends to get away 
from all the crazy things 
happening on campus, like 
covering events for the TV 
and radio stations. Most 
weeks during the school 
year, he is in the station at 
least five nights a week. 
Dan is currently hosting his 
own radio show, "Sundays 
with Rink." 



To relax, he likes to 
hang out with his friends. 
Upon graduation, he would 
like to become an executive 
producer of a major televi- 
sion or radio network. He 
said he loves his job and 
takes pride in it. He enjoys 
helping other students at 
the university improve their 
skills in the hope they will 
be able to advance in their 
field. 

While participating in 
radio and television broad- 
casting, Rinkus said that he 
would also like to take up 
photography and explore 
the art of film making. 



Martin Luther King's dream: 40 yrs later 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_saclesmond@clarion.eclu 

September 24 marks the 
beginning of the 13th year of 



the Martin Luther King Jr. 
Speaker Series at Clarion. 

This year's theme, "The 
Dream: 40 Years Later," cel- 
ebrates the anniversary of 
the assassination of Dr. 
Martin Luther King Jr. The 




This year's thenie for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Speaker Series 
is "The Dream: 40 Years Later " Andres "The Cuban Guy" Lara, 
photo courtesy of PAGES, k/cks off the series on Sept. 24 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Genimell !\/lulti-Purpose Room. (PAGES) 



official anniversary will be 
on April 4, 2008. 

The eight presentations 
over the course of the series 
will have this theme incor- 
porated into them. 

The Martin Luther King 
Jr. Committee provides this 
and other events throughout 
the year in conjunction with 
other departments and 
organizations. 

"It provides opportunities 
for different organizations 
to work together as well as 
provides quality cultural 
and educational events," 
said Dr. Rogers Laugand, 
the co-chair of the commit- 
tee. 

The committee attempts 
to inform the public of the 
complete span of Martin 
Luther King Jr.'s leadership 
during his life beyond segre- 
gation. 

This year's presenters 
range from hip-hop musi- 
cians to artists to authors. 
They are also working in 
collaboration with the Hip- 
Hop Symposium and Equity 
Week.' 

Laugand believes that 



attending these presenta- 
tions provides students with 
information they can use 
both in and out of the class- 
room. 

"They learn about differ- 
ent cultures and how we 
should live in peace and 
harmony despite our differ- 
ences, particularly our 
race." he said. "More impor- 
tantly, they learn about 
what it is to be a true leader 
in our world." 



ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 




Dear Dr. Eagle, 

Recently I've seen several television and magazine ads 
for a product to prevent HPV in women. What is HPV 
and why is so much attention drawn to it now? 

Signed, 
One Less 

Dear One Less. 

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recettWy 
approved the first vaccine to prevent cervical cancer, 
lesions and genital warts caused by four types of the 
Human Papillomavirus (HPV). 

There are over 100 types and strains of HPV and 
more than 30 of these are sexually transmitted. It is 
very contagious. It's estimated that there are more 
cases of HPV infections than any other STI in the 
United States, with 20 million people already infected 
and 6.2 million new cases reported each year. 

Some types of HPV may lead to cancers of the 
cervix, vagina, vulva, anus and penis, and other strains 
cause genital warts. Annually. 10,000 women get cervi- 
cal cancer and 3,700 die from it in the US. 

Genital warts are the most easily recognized sign of 
HPV and may appear in the cervix, vagina, vulva, anus, 
scrotum, penis, groin and thigh (and rarely in the 
mouth or throat from oral sex). However. 50% of infect- 
ed women had no symptoms that you can see or feel and 
most people don't know they are infected. 

Diagnosis of HPV can be made by an abnormal pap 
smear, a test to detect HPV DNA. or by applying a solu- 
tion to make invisible warts more visible. Amazingly, 
50% of sexually active men and women are infected 
with HPV during their lifetime. 

Treatments for genital warts depend on the size and 
locations of the warts. They may include application of 
creams or ointments, or removal by freezing, burning, 
laser treatments or surgery. These treatments can g^t 
rid of the warts, but NOT the virus itself. HPV remains 
present in the body and warts may come back after 
treatment. 

The advertisements you mention are for Gardasil 
vaccine for women. Gardasil was approved to prevent 
four types of HPV; the two (types 16 and 18) that cause 
70 percent of cervical cancers and two (types 6 and U) 
which cause 90 percent of genital warts. Gardasil is 
administered in three doses and recommended for 
females 9-26 years of age (preferably before their first 
sexual contact. Keeling Health Center is currently offer- 
ing it). 

Dr. Eagle is written by Valerie Wonderling of the Keeling 

Health Center. For more information or to suggest a topic, 

e-mail her at s_vjwonclerli@clarion.edu. 



ADVISING INFORMANT 

Have questions about making the most of your education at Clarion? 
We'll find the answers! 



What's the best way to meet with my advisor? 



If you haven't met with them yet, it's a good idea to 
arrange a meeting with him/her before you schedule for 
the spring semester. Use the people finder to find their e- 
mail address or phone number and contact them to make 
n appointment. 

Ajiother option is to take part in Meet Your Advisor 
Week. It runs this year from September 24-27 and depart- 
ments have many different activities going on. Contact your 
department for details on their individual events. 



Advising Informant is a service of Clarion University's Advising Office. If you have 
any quostions you would like answered, e-mail the office staff at advising(a;clarion.edu. 





Former CUP graduates. Capt. Al McCord and Lt. Col. Steve Lunardini, landed two Apache AH 64 
helicopters on the practice fields at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 5. They explained the helicopters 
and their use with CUP's ROTC program. "It was quite an experience being five feet away from a 
helicopter," said David Keremes, a junior MMAJ major. (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



■i 



September 13. 2007 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



Olivas-Lujan researches US and Mexico technology 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller#clarion.eclu 

Recently, "IvlIKM in 
Mexico: Adapting 

Innovations for Global 
Competitiveness." an article 
about the rise of e-HRM in 
the country of Mexico co- 
authored by Clarion 
Professor Dr. Miguel Olivas- 
Lujan, was published in the 
International Journal of 
Manpower. 

E-HRM (Human 

Resource Management) is 
the use of communicative 
technology in businesses, 
such as computers, tele- 
phones and fax machines. 

Olivas-Lujan. a profes- 
sor of management, was 
born and raised in Mexico 
and has lived in Clarion for 
eight years. 

He has been teaching 
since the mid-nineties and 
received doctorates in 
Human Resources and 
Computer Technology at, 
Tecnologico De Monterrey in 



Mexico. He said that is what 
got him so interested in 
doing this article on e-HRM, 
since it combines both of his 
areas of study. 

OlivasLujan co-wrote 
the article with two of his 
colleagues from Tecnologico 
De Monterrey. Jacobo 
Ramirez and Laura Zapata- 
Cantu. He said that they all 
received their doctorates 
around the same time and 
has kept in touch with them 
over the years. The idea to 
do the article occurred 
when they realized that not 
much study was done in 
Latin America on the topic 
of eHRM. which is a rapid- 
ly fast rising way of doing 
business in most countries, 
especially here in the 
United States, So, they 
decided to show its progress 
in Mexico. 

The case study was done 
on four businesses, all at dif- 
ferent levels of e-HRM. 
Some are very advanced and 
other companies are not 
quite to their level. Two of 
the companies are global in 
nature, but all were .started 



and are based in Mexico. 

Olivas-Lujan said that 
they interviewed the man- 
agers of the four businesses 
to conduct their research. 
He and his colleagues dis- 
covered that culture plays a 
major role in the use of tech- 
nology in these businesses. 
He compared the business 
culture in America to the 
one in Mexico and how that 
affected the use of e-HRM. 
Business workers in 
America tend to be more 
independent and they will 
voice their opinions if they 
have a suggestion or opinion 
about how business should 
be done using e-HRM and 
usually have their co-work- 
ers to back them up, he said. 

Things are much differ- 
ent in Mexico. The use of e- 
HRM technology is strongly 
dependent on the prefer- 
ences of the boss and if there 
is a difference in opinion, 
employees will not voice 
their concerns and things 
will stay the same way. 

For example, if the boss 
of one of the companies 
doesn't want to use e-mail 



as part of their communica- 
tive technology, e-mail will 
nujst likely not be used. 
This explains why some 
companies seem to be more 
advanced in their use of e- 
HRM compared to other 
companies that seem to just 
he falling behind. This also 
strengthens Olivas-Lujan 
and his colleagues' theory 
that the culture of some 
countries strongly affects 
the use of e-HRM technolo- 
gy in businesses. 

Olivas-Lujan said that 
there are three main points 
he wants people to get out of 
reading his article on e- 
HRM. He wants people to 
know that there is strong 
ongoing research in Mexico 
on this topic. E-HRM is a 
big way of doing business all 
over the world, not just in 
Mexico and in the United 
States, and he wants people 
to know that Mexico is not 
falling behind. He said that 
this is the first research 
done on e-HRM in Mexico, 
that he knows of. 

The second point is 
something he wants man- 




Dr Miguel OlivasLujan, photo released by NEWSwire, co- 
authored "E-HRM in Mexico: Adapting Innovations for Global 
Competitiveness." It was published in the "International Journal 
of Manpower " (NEWSwire) 



agers to know. He wants 
them to realize that e-HRM 
is increasing in popularity 
in all counties and doesn't 
want to see businesses and 
their managers get left 
behind. 



The third is that he 
wants managers to use e- 
HRM in a way that fits with 
their business so that they 
don't waste company money 
on things that they do not 
need. 




Signing a music contract may lead 
to signing your deatii certificate 



Members of CUP's Golden Eagle Marching Band dance on the field while performing 'You're the 
First, the Last, My Everything" by Barry White. This year's half-time show, "Spectacle 2007," also 
includes "Sir Duke" by Stevie Wonder and "Word Up" by Cameo. Dr Hubert Toney Jr is the 
University Director of Bands; Randall Oaks and Cliris Anderson are the drum majors. (The Clarion 
Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



^mpuf Ctese-up 







Know someone 

who is an 

outstanding student? 

Nominate them for the 

Campus Close-up! Send their name 

and why they deserve it to 

s sade$mond@clahon.edu 




Rob Miller 

Los Angeles Times 

Since the dawn of rock 
'n' roll, death has been a 
recurring theme. But for 
many young musicians, 
lyrics that dwell on mortali- 
ty are prophetic. 

A new study has found 
that rock and pop stars are 
more than twice as likely to 
die at a young age than the 
rest of the population— and 
more than three times as 
likely to die within five 
years of becoming famous. 
The unhealthy behavior 
that leads to such untimely 
deaths harms more than 
musicians, the researchers 
said. It also sets a bad 
example for the millions of 
people who emulate them. 

"Like any industry, the 
music industry should see 
the health of its participants 
as a priority as well as the 
wide effect it may have on 
consumers of its products," 
said Mark A. Bellis. the 
study's lead author and 
director of the Centre for 
Public Health at Liverpool 
John Moores University, in 
an interview conducted by e- 
mail. "It is, after all, a music 
industry, not a promotional 
tour for alcohol and drugs." 

Bellis says his research 



team undertook the study, 
which claims to be the first 
to quantify the effect of pop 
music stars' live-fast-die- 
young culture, because the 
death rates in the pop 
industry have not been well 
studied and because pop 
stars have a tremendous 
influence on others. 

Although researchers 
expected to find that musi- 
cians die younger — after all. 
that is the common percep- 
tion — they were surprised to 
see how many of those 
deaths occurred near the 
peak of ffnne and that the 
death rate remained double 
that of the normal popula- 
tion even 25 years after the 
musicians became famous. 

The study, published 
last week, in the Journal of 
Epidemiology and 

Community Health, was 
based on more than 1,050 
North American and 
European musicians and 
singers who achieved fame 
between 1956 and 1999. All 
the musicians were featured 
in the "Ail-Time Top 1000 
Albums," selected in 2000. 
They represented a range of 
genres, including rock. pop. 
punk, rap, R&B, electronica 
and new age. 

For each pop star, the 
researchers calculated total 
vears of survival and com- 



pared the numbers with 
their expected survival 
based on a general popula- 
tion of people similar in gen- 
der, nationality and ethnici- 
ty. 

Of the 100 pop stars 
who had died, the average 
age of death was 35 for 
Eiu'opean musicians and 42 
for American stars. 

The study does not 
prove that being a pop star 
causes an early death, but 
it's clear that elements of 
the lifestyle are unhealth- 
ful. says Anton H. Hart, a 
psychologist and psychoana- 
lyst in New York City who 
counts many professional 
musicians among his 
clients. 

Hart says previous 
research suggests a bitter 
downside to fame that may 
lead to depression, anxiety, 
substance abuse, risky sexu- 
al behavior and general 
carelessness. 

"Fame fulfills grandiose 
wishes to be known by 
everyone and loved by 
everyone," he says. "It's 
exhilarating but gives way 
to a sense that fame is not 
as fulfilling as it was 
assumed to be. That is a 
very difficult and depi'essing 
thing." 



WCUC 




HG SHOW 



WITH HUHA AND MARIA 

(WEEKDAYS 6:30-9 a.m.) 

AFTERNOON DRIVE WITH STEIN 



-« » ?t 'Cl"\ *\' 



THE '^EXCLUSIVl 
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THE CLARION CALL 



Feitms 



September 13. 2007 September 13. 2007 



TOE CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



Gregg Band/uh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbancl/uh#clarion.edu 

Daniel Kinkus, or 
"Kink" ns most pcopli- kiKiw 
him, was born on May 23. 
198(). His hometown is 
Drums. Pa. just outside of 
Hazleton. 

ftiiikus was a 2(1(1 1 urad' 
uate of HaYleton Hmh 
Sehool. Duriiii^ lus time 
there, he participated in 
cross country, track and 
swimming. Besides athlet- 
ics, he really enjoyed hroad 
casting. 

Orignially choosing to 
come to Clarion University 
to be invoked with the swim 
team. Fvinkus" priorities led 
himtoW('UB-T\'. 

A.s a freshman, he start- 
ed at the bottom of the bar- 
rel and worki'd his way u|) 
to the top. He started at 
VVCIJB-TV working as a 
reporter and news anchor 
before becoming the execu- 
tive pi'oducer for the dura- 
tion of his sophomore year. 

Also in his sophomore 
year, Rinkus and Matt 
Steinhiser hosted their own 
radio show together called 
"The Hapi)\ Hour with 
Stein and Rink." They 
talked about s])orts. pla>cd 
music and did a little come- 
dy. He said he had a lot of 
fun in the t)rucess. This 
show was liis fii-st hi'eak 
into the radio industry 

The following year, as a 
junior. Kinkus became sta- 










?*^" 







ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 



'•£!&m£i' 






?^>sm:^ 









tion manager of VVCUB-TV. 
For se\-en weeks this past 
sununer. he helped renovate 
the station's cotUrol rnum. 

Ahmg with being the TV 
station manager and a part- 
time director, liinkus is a 
member of the National 
Broadcasting Societv and a 
dee jay at WCUC-FM. 

I'Aen though ht^ spends 
most of his time in broad- 
casting, he is interested m 
other things. Me played the 
trum|)et for ten \ears aiul is 
also interested in sports. He 
follows almost all of the 
major sporting events in the 
world. His favorite XFl. 
team is the N'ew York 
(hants, his favorite MLB 
team is the Philadelphia 
Phillies and his favorite 



NHL team is the Pittsburgh 
Penguins. He is also a 
NASCAR fan. 

"Scrubs" tops the list of 
his favorite TV shows. He 
does not like to miss a single 
episode, if he can help it. He 
also likes listening to his 
favorite bands: Guster. The 
Shins, Coldplay. Jack 
Johnson and Wilco. 

Rinkus enjoys going out 
on the weekends to get away 
from all the crazy things 
happening on campus, like 
covering events for the TV 
and radio stations. Most 
weeks during the school 
year, he is in the station at 
least five nights a week. 
Dan is currently hosting his 
own radio show. "Sundays 
with Rink." 



To relax, he likes to 
hang out with his friends. 
Upon graduation, he would 
like to become an executive 
producer of a major televi- 
sion 01' radio network. He 
said he loves his job and 
takes pride in it. He enjoys 
helping other students at 
the university improve their 
skills in the hope they will 
be able to advance in their 
field. 

While participating in 
i-adio and television broad- 
casting, Rinkus said that he 
would also like to take up 
photography and explore 
the art of film making. 



Martin Luther King's dream: 40 yrs later 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features E(Jitor 

s_sadesmond§clarion.edu 

September 24 marks the 
beginning of the 13th year of 



the Martin Luther King Jr. 
Speaker Series at Clarion. 

This year's theme. "The 
Dream: 40 Years Later," cel- 
ebrates the anniversary of 
the assassination of Dr. 
Martin Luther King Jr. The 




Wis year's then ic foi the Martin Luther Kmg, Jr. Speaker Series 
is "The Dream: 40 Years Later." Andres "The Cuban Guy" Lara, 
photo courtesy of PAGES, kicks off the series on Sept. 24 at 7:30 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multipurpose Roon). (PAGES) 



official anniver-sary will oe 
on April 4. 2008. 

The eight presentations 
over the course of the series 
will have this theme incor- 
porated into them. 

The Martin Luther King 
Jr. Committee provides this 
and other events throughout 
the year in conjunction with 
other departments and 
organizations. 

"It provides opportunities 
for different organizations 
to work together as well as 
provides quality cultural 
and educational events," 
said Dr. Rogers Laugand. 
the co-chair of the commit- 
tee. 

The committee attempts 
to inform the public of the 
complete span of Martin 
Luther King Jr.s leadership 
during his life beyond segre- 
gation. 

This year's presenters 
range from hip-hop musi- 
cians to arti.sts to authors. 
They are also working in 
collaboration with the Hip- 
Hop Svmposium and Equitv 
Week. 

Laugand believes that 



attending these presenta- 
tions provides students with 
information they can use 
both in and out of the class- 
room. 

"They learn about differ- 
ent cultures and how we 
should live in peace and 
harmony despite our differ- 
ences, particularly our 
race," he said. "More impor- 
tantly, they learn about 
what it is to be a true leader 
in our world." 



Dear Dr. Eagle. 

Recently I've seen several television and magazine ads 
for a product to prevent HPV in women. What is HPV 
and why is so much attention drawn to it now? 

Signed. 
One Less 

Dear One Less. 



I'he Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently 
approved the first vaccine to prevent cervical cancer, 
lesions and genital warts caused by four types of the 
Human Papillomavirus (HPV). 

There are over 100 types and strains of HPV and 
more than 30 of these are sexually transmitted. It is 
very contagious. It's estimated that there are more 
cases of HPV infections than any other STI in the 
United States, with 20 million people already infected 
and 6.2 million new cases reported each year. 

Some types of HPV may lead to cancers of the 
cervix, vagina, vulva, anus and penis, and other strains 
cause genital warts. Annually 10.000 women get cervi- 
cal cancer and 3,700 die from it in the US, 

(Jenital warts are the most easily recognized sign of 
HPV and may appear in the cervix, vagina, vulva, anus, 
scrotum, penis, groin and thigh (and rarely in the 
mouth or throat from oral sex). However. 50% of infect- 
ed women had no symptoms that you can see or feel and 
most people don't know they are infected. 

Diagnosis of HPV can be made by an abnormal pap 
smear, a test to detect HPV DNA. or by applying a solu- 
tion to make invisible warts more visible. Amazingly, 
50"i) of sexually active men and women are infected 
with HPV during their lifetime. 

Treatments for genital warts depend on the size and 
locations of the warts. They may include application of 
creams or ointments, or removal by freezing, burning, 
laser treatments or surgery These treatments can get 
rid of the warts, but NOT the virus itself. HPV remains 
present in the body and warts may come back after 
treatment. 

The advertisements you mention are for Gardasil 
vaccine for women. Gardasil was approved to prevent 
four types of HPV the two (types 16 and 18) that cause 
70 percent of cervical cancers and two (types 6 and 11) 
which cause 90 percent of genital warts. Gardasil is 
administered in three doses and recommended for 
females 9-26 years of age (preferably before their first 
sexual contact, Keeling Health Center is currently offer- 
ing it). 

Dv. Eagle IS written by Valerie WonderUng of the Keeling 

Henlth Center. For more information or to suggest a topic, 

e-mail her at syjmmderli^f^i clarion.edu. 



Apache helicopters land in Memorial Stadium 



ADVISING INFORMANT 

Have questions about making the most of your education at Clarion? 
We'll find the answers! 




Ar! 



the iicst w.-ty to meet with mv advisor? 



If you ha\en"t met with them yet. it's a good idea to 
arrange a meeting with him/her before you schedule for 
the spring semester. U.se the people finder to find their e- 
mail address or phone number and contact them to make 
11 appointment. 

Another option is to take part in Meet Your Advisor 
•k. It runs this year from September 24-27 and depart- 
have many different activities going on. Contact your 
epartnient for details on their individual events. 



'nfoimant is a service of Clarion University's Advising Office. If you have 
in- ycni woulil like answered, e-mail the office staff at advising',«clarion.edu. 




former CUP graduates. Capt. Al McCordand Lt. Coi Steve Lunardmi. landed two Apache AH 64 
helicopters on the practice fields at Memorial Stadium on Sept. 5. They explained the helicopters 
and their use with CUPs ROTC program. "It was quite an experience being five feet away from a 
helicopter, said David Keremes. a junior MMAJ major. (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



Olivas-Lujan researches US and Mexico technology 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpiniller§clanon.edu 

Recently 'IvIIKM m 
Mt'xieo^ Adapting 

Innovations for (Uobal 
Competitiveness." an article 
about the rise of e-HH.M in 
th(> country of Mexico co- 
authored by (Tarion 
Professor Dr. Miguel Olivas- 
Lujan. was published in the 
Internationul Journ.tl of 
Manpowvr. 

E-HRM (Human 

Resource Management) is 
the use of communicative 
technology in businesses, 
such as computers, tele- 
phones and fax machini's. 

Olivas-Lujan. a profes- 
sor of management, was 
born and raised in Mexico 
and has lived in Clarion for 
eight years. 

He has been teaching 
since the mid-nineties and 
received doctorates in 
Human Resources ami 
Computer Technology at 
Tecnologico De Montei-rev in 



Mexico. Hwf^aid that is what 
got him so interested in 
doing this article on e-HR.\I, 
since it comhiiies both of his 
areas of study. 

Olivas Lujan covvrote 
the article with two of his 
colleagues from Tecnolngico 
De .Monterrey. -Jacidxi 
Ramiic/ iiiid Laura Zapata- 
Cantu, lie .said that they all 
leceivfd their doctorates 
around the same time and 
has kept in touch with them 
over tile years. The idea to 
do the article occurreil 
when they realized that not 
much study was done in 
Latin America on the topic 
ol ellKM, which is a rapid- 
ly fa.st rising way of doiny 
business in most countries, 
especially here in the 
United States. So, they 
decided to show its progress 
in .Mexico. 

The case study was done 
on four businesses, all at dif- 
ferent levels of e-HRM. 
Some are very advanced and 
other companies are not 
quite to their level. Two of 
the companies are global in 
nature, but all were started 



and are baseil m Mexico, 

Olivas-Lujan said that 
lhe> interviewed the man- 
agers of the four busines.ses 
to conduct their research. 
He and his colleagues dis- 
covered that culture plays a 
major role in the us(> of tech- 
nology in these busines.ses. 
He compared the business 
culture in .\iiierica to the 
one in Mexico and how that 
affected the use of e-HRM. 
Business workers in 
America tend to be more 
indetiendent and they will 
voice their opinions if they 
have a sugg(>stion or opinion 
about how business should 
be done using e-HRM and 
usuall\ have their co-work- 
er.N to liack them up. he said. 
Things are much tliffer- 
eiit in Mexico. The use of e- 
HRM technology is strongly 
dependent on the prefer- 
ences of the bo.ss and if there 
is a difference in opinion, 
employees will not voice 
their concerns and things 
will stay the same way. 

For example, if the boss 
of one of the companies 
doesn't want to use e-mail 



as part ol their communica- 
tive technology, email will 
most likely not he u»ed. 
This explains why some 
companies seem to be more 
advanced in their u.se of e- 
HRM compared to other 
companies that seem to ju.st 
he falling behind. This also 
strengthen^ Olivas-Lujan 
and his colleagues" theory 
that the culture of some 
countries strongly affects 
the use of e-HRM technolo- 
gy in businesses. 

Olivas-Lujan said that 
there are three maiti points 
he wants people to get out of 
reading his article on e- 
HR.M. He wants people to 
know that there is strong 
ongoing research in Mexico 
on this topic. E'HRM is a 
big way of doing business all 
over the world, not just in 
Mexico and in the United 
States, and he wants people 
to know that Mexico is not 
falling behind. He said that 
this is the first research 
done on e-fiRM in Mexico, 
that he knows of. 

The second point is 
something he wants man- 




Dr. Miguel 0/;vas Lu/dM, pliotv ^luu.l.; l. .\l„..„,i,,. ,.u 
authored "EHRI^I m Mexico: Adapting Innovations for Global 
Competitiveness." It was published m f/ie International Journal 
of !\/1anpower. " (NEWSwire) 



agers to know. He wants 
them to realize that ellRM 
is increasing in popularity 
in all counties and doesn't 
want to >,ee businesses and 
their managers get left 
behind. 



The thud i^ that lie 
wants maiinuei's to u.se c- 
HK,\1 in a way that fits witli 
their business .so that they 
don t waste companv money 
on tliiiii;.s tiiat tliev di) not 
need. 




Signing a music contract may iead 
to signing your deatli certificate 



Members ofCUP's Golden Eagle Marching Band dance on the field while pertormmg "Youre the 
First, the Last, My Everything" by Barry White. This years half-time show, "Spectacle 2007, " also 
includes "Sir Dui<e" by Stevie Wonder and "Word Up" by Cameo. Dr. Hubert Toney Jr is the 
University Director of Bands: Randall Oaks and Chris .Anderson are the drum majors (The Clarion 
Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



<ampu| <lase-up 



•V' 



■ -J* 






<^^ thy 










Know someone 

who is an 

outstanding student? 

Nominate them for the 

Campus Close-up! Send their name 

and why they deserve it to 

s sade$mond(5)clarion .edu 



Rob Miller 

Los Angeles Times 

Since the dawn (jf rock 
'n" roll, death has been a 
recurring theme. But for 
many young musicians, 
lyrics that dwell on mortali- 
ty are prophetic. 

A new study has found 

that rock and pop stars are 

more than twdce as likely to 

die at a young age than the 

rest of the population— and 

more than three times as 

likely to die within five 

years of becoming famous. 

The unhealthy behavior 

that leads to such untimely 

deaths harms more than 

musicians, the researchers 

•said. It also sets a bad 

example for the millions of 

people who emulate them. 

"Like any industrv. the 
music industry should see 
the health of its participants 
as a priority as well as the 
wide effect it may have on 
consumers of its products." 
said Mark A. Bellis. the 
study's lead author and 
director of the Centre for 
Public Health at Liverpool 
•John Moores University, in 
an interview conducted by e- 
mail. "It is. after all. a music 
industi'N. not a promotional 
tour for alcohol and drugs." 
Bellis savs his research 



wcuc 




team undertook the study 
which claims to be the first 
to quantify the effect of pop 
music stars' live-fast-die- 
young culture, because the 
(k'aih rates in (he pop 
industry have not been well 
studied and because pop 
stars have a tremendous 
inlluence on others. 

Although researcher.- 
expected to find that musi- 
cians die younger — alter all. 
that is the common percep- 
tion — they were surprised to 
see how many of those 
deaths occurred neai' the 
peak of fame and that the 
death rate remained double 
that of the normal popula- 
tion even LM years after the 
musicians became famous. 

The study published 
last week, in the Journa] of 
Epidomiohgy nnd 

Conununity Health, was 
based on more than l,()."i(i 
North American and 
Kuropean musicians and 
singers who achiexcd ranie 
between ]9o6 and 1999. .All 
the musicians were featured 
in the "Ail-Time Top IflOO 
.Minims." .selected in 2000. 
TlH>y n'liresented a range of 
genres, including rock, iioj), 
punk, rap, R&B. electroniea 
and new age. 

For each jiop star the 
researchers calculated total 
years of survival and com- 



pared flic numbecs with 
llu'ir t'xpt'cied su!'\ival 
based on a general popula- 
tion of people similar in gen- 
der, nationality and ethnici- 
ty. 

Of the !()0 pop stru's 
who had (iicil. the n\-ei'age 
age of death was :>,') fur 
Kuropean niusuians and VI 
lor .Anu'iicaii stars. 

The stud} does not 
prove that being a pop star 
causes an earlv de.ath. but 
it's clear that elemeut.s of 
the hiestvie are uiih(>alth- 
hil. says Anton li. Mart, a 
p.syehologisr and p.-^ychoana- 
lyst in .New 'Vork City who 
counts many pi'olessiunal 
musicians anmng Ins 
clit>nts. 

Hart says previous 
research sugg<'sls a. hitler 
downside to tame that may 
lead to depi'es.-K.n. anxiety, 
substance abuse, risky sexu- 
al behavKU' and general 
carelessness. 

"Fame fulfills grandiose 
wishes t(' be known by 
everyone and luved by 
ever\()tu>," he .sa\s, "It's 
exhilarating but gives wav 
to a sense that fame is not 
as fulfilling as it was 
assuineil to Ite. That is a 
vei'\- difficult and depressing 
thinu." 




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TTffi CLARION CALL 



September 13. 2007 



September 13, 2007 



EttoHimnt 

Sex Talk excites CUP students 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.edu 

On September 12 at 8 
p.m. over one thousand stu- 
dents flooded Marwick-Fioyd 
Auditorium. Before the 
stars came on stage "Sue, 
Sue, Sue" echoed through 
the room. Finally, Sue 
Johanson and Dr. Marty 
Klein came on the stage. 

Johanson has been a sex 
educator for 40 years. She 
originally started out as a 
nurse. She started a cHnic 
that provided birth control 
for young adults and real- 
ized how many young people 
are having sex. At this point 
she decided to go back to 
become a sex educator. Her 
television show. Talk Sex 
with Sue Johanson, is going 
into its seventh year on the 
Oxygen channel. She does 
dozens of lectures at colleges 
each year. 

Klein has been a 
licensed psychologist and 
certified sex therapist for 27 
years. He has written six 
books and a blog on his Web 
site www.martyklein.com. 
Klein just helped write the 
Supreme Court brief asking 



to legalize vibrators in six 
states. 

One rea.son that Klein 
and Johanson began work- 
ing together i,s tso that dur- 
ing a program the audience 
can not only receive a 
female's perspective, but a 
males as well. 

Beginning the program 
with some friendly sexual 
oriented jokes and banter- 
ing back and forth, Klein 
and Johanson had the crowd 
roaring with laughter. 

During all this banter- 
ing, they were discussing 



many of things including 
why people have sex. Some 
of the reasonings that they 
y;i\(' were in rebellion of 
parents and because it feels 
good. They also discussed 
that when heterosexual 
peopi have fantasies about 
people of the same sex it 
does not make them "gay." 

One big thing that both 
Johanson and Klein 
stressed greatly was the use 
of condoms. At point point 
she said, answering a ques- 
tion about whether condoms 
work or not. "Condoms 




Dr. Marty Klein answered the sex questions that no one wants 
to answer in IVIarwicl<-Boyd (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz). 



Craft-ed exhibit comes 
to University Gallery 



work, just not on your bed- 
side, in your back pocket or 
in your purse." 

They also addressed 
topics such as masturbation, 
oral sex, protection from dis- 
ease and infection as well as 
abstinence. 

Johanson and Klein 
were constantly throwing 
random facts at the audi- 
ence. One fact, given by 
Klein, was that the clitoris 
only has one purpose: to 
pleasure. Then Johanson 
added that it doubles in size 
when a woman becomes sex- 
ually aroused. 

While on the topic of 
female arousal, male arous- 
al came into play. It was 
then addressed than men 
can ejaculate without expe- 
riencing an orgasm. 

Johan.son also discussed 
her perfect night. It 
involved a bottle of good 
wine, a box of chocolates, a 
dozen red roses, scented 
candles and soft hghting. To 
top it off, she wants her 
partner to whisper five 
things in her ear: I love you. 
I want you, I need you, 
Baby, you're the greatest 
and I will never leave you. 

Another fact that was 
given was that 85 percent of 




Sue Johanson has her own talk show on the Oxygen channel 
entitled "Talk Sex with Sue Johanson" and its going on its sev- 
enth year (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz). 

women in a long-term, sta- At the beginning of the 

ble relationship fantasize show, postcards were passed 
about someone else during out and those in attendance 



sex. 

One thing that was real- 
ly stressed throughout the 
entire show was that com- 
munication is really impor- 
tant between partners. 
Klein said that is seems that 
talking about .sex is more 
intimate than actually hav- 
ing sex. This is because peo- 
ple are so scared to talk 
about what they actually 
want in sex. 



were asked to write ([ucs- 
tions on them. 

Johanson and Klein 
closed the show by reading 
some of the questions aloud 
and answering them. Some 
of the questions included 
topics like lubrication, .sex 
toys and anal sex. 

The show ended with a 
standing ovation and a large 
round of applause. 



Anf^ber Stockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alstockhol§clarion.edu 

Love art? Looking for an 
experience that is interest- 
ing, different and nearby? If 
so, then definitely check out 
the University Gallery's 
newest art exhibit, Craft-ed. 

This particular show- 
case takes a look at art, 
what really composes it and 
whether it's traditional 
ideas or contemporary. 
Craft-ed features the work 
of three artists whose works 
are constructed using tech- 
niques beyond the tradition- 
al art practice. Artists Chris 
Walla, Sarah Christensen- 
Blair and Nicholas R. 
Schutsky all use normal 
everyday material in their 
artwork that still make a 
huge impact in the world of 
art, regardless of how much 
it costs to actually construct 
the pieces. 

A few exhibits offered by 
these artists are Walla's 
"Hanky Project," a 24 piece 
stitchery displayed on ban- 
danas, Schutsky's "Slate 
Cross," which was con- 



structed of Legos, and 
Christensen-Rlair's "24 
Months," which features 
crocheted fibers made from 
empty birth control packets. 
Walla teaches in the 
Department of Art and 
Design at Minnesota State 
University Moorhead. His 
"Bluechip Paintings" are a 
replication of the infamous 
Martha Stewart's paint 
chips. Using paints pur- 
chased at K-Mart, he con- 
fronts social hierarchy 
issues of taste by imitating 
color combinations that copy 
a figure that has been an 
icon of art and taste. 

Schutsky, a recipient of 
a Master of Fine Arts degree 
from the University of 
Delaware, has works every- 
where from New York to 
Monte Carlo found in the 
homes of prominent private 
collectors. If his "Slate 
Cross" created from Legos 
didn't catch your eye then 
his masterpiece "White, Red 
on Yellow" displayed using a 
Lite-Brite definitely will. 

Christensen-Blair, a 
design teacher at Northern 
State University, offers 
many beautiful crocheted 



fibers to the show that con- 
front the complexity of the 
female identity. Her works 
are both timeless and 
intriguing. 

The three artists use 
these normal everyday 
materials to construct their 
distinctive pieces of art that 
sell anywhere from $400- 
$2,000 dollars. Their tech- 
niques toy with the bound- 
aries of art and crafts in the 
modern world. 

These three artists' dif- 
ferent approaches to art 
offer a new and refreshing 
way to view art and its 
meanings. The showcase's 
different and unusual pieces 
are unlike any other art dis- 
play around. 

The exhibit is visiting 
the Clarion campus from 
Sept. 4 through Oct. 4, when 
it will then head to the 
University of Miami. Be 
sure to stop by the 
University Gallery, Level A, 
in the Carlson Library for a 
view of this fascinating dis 
play of art and its many pos 
sibilities. 



Brad Paisley tickets seil out 



Rachella Vollant-Barie 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ravollantb@clanon.edu 

On Sept. 15, Brad 
Paisley is coming to 
Burgettstown, Pa., along 
with Taylor Swift and 
Rodney Atkins. The 
University Activities Board 
arranged for a bus to take 
students to the concert. 

Paisley is a five time 
CMA award winner, 
received four Grammy nom- 
inations in 2006 and has 
had five number one hits, 
including "Mud on the 
Tires" and "Time Well 
Wasted." All four of his 



albums have either been 
certified Platinum or Double 
Platinum (total sales exceed 
six million copies). 

The bus tour to see the 
show was an idea that was 
thought of and acted upon 
by UAB. The original choice 
of artist was not Paisley, but 
another artist: Taylor Swift. 

Mike Neely, UAB 
Campusfest Chair, said, 
"When we did a survey of 
students, she (Taylor Swift) 
ended up with the second 
most votes, only a couple 
behind the top spot. This 
was a way for us to honor 
the students' survey 
results." 

Even though the tickets 



to the Paisley concert have 

sold out, there will be much 

more entertainment in the 

future presented by the 

Campusfest Committee to 
look out for. 

There are two main 
events that are already 
scheduled for now. The first 
is the Fall Campusfest, 
which is set to take place 
Wednesday, October 10 in 
Tippin Gym and will be fea- 
turing MTV's VM.'\ New 
Artist of the Year ( !ym Class 
Heroes. Doors are scheduled 
to open at 6 p.m. and the 
show will begin at 7 p.m. 
There is also scheduled to be 
an event to occur on Ma 
(jras in Februarv. 



"Halloween": a real 
treat from a Zombie 



Joey Pettine 

Clarior) Call Staff Writer 

sJmpettine@clarion.edu 





"Halloween" 
Director: Rob Zombie 
Rating: 4/5 



Chris Wall provided a 24 piece stitchery displayed on bandanas entitled "Hank Project' for the 
Craft- ed exhibit in the University Gallery (The Clarion Call/Stefanie Julaj. 



A young boy, no more 
than ten, with golden blonde 
hair, stands at the foot of his 
sister's bed. Slowly he bends 
down to pick something off 
the floor, unnoticed by his 
older sibling who lays care- 
lessly on her stomach, over- 
sized headphones blasting 
"Don't Fear the Reaper" 
atop her head. And we, the 
audience, have the briefest 
of moments to reflect on 
both the macabre poetry 
and sick humor of what we 



are watching. 

For as the young boy 
lifts his head back into view, 
it is adorned with a white 
rubber mask, brown hair 
jutting from the top and 
behind the mask... nothing. 
The eyes of that boy are just 
as blank as those of the 
mask itself. This boy is 
Michael Myers and the 
movie is "Halloween." 

Directed by Rob Zombie, 
("House of 1000 Corpses," 
"The Devil's Rejects") the 
2007 remake of the 1978 
John Carpenter classic will 
leave horror fans both 
frightened and impressed. 

Blending elements of 
both a classic horror genre 
in with his own style of 
intense gore. Zombie does 
for Myers what has not been 
done in over six movies and 
fifteen years, he has made 
the character scary again. 

At the same time, the 
movie acts as a homage to 
the original "Halloween," 
using the classic mask and 
theme, replicating infamous 
scenes, and even filming in 
the same locations as the 
original. 

Ti'ue horror aficionados 
will squeal with delight as 
Myers isn't the onlv face 




from classic horror to grace 
this screen. With such 
prominent horror actors as 
Malcolm McDowell ("A 
Clockwork Orange"). Brad 
Dourif ("The Chucky 
Movies"). Danny Tre)o 
("From Dusk Tili Dawn'"'), 
Doe Wallace ("I'ujo") and 
even the beautiful Danielle 
Harris, star of Halloween's 4 
and 5. Zombie's "Halktween" 
is chocked lull of horrific 
goodies. 

When you get right 
down to It though. 
"Halloween" is just a good 
scare. While I would obvi- 
ously not rot'omnit'nd this 
film to those who don't want 
to be scared, anyhodx in the 
mood for a real fright will 
find "Halloween" a real 
treat. 



IffiCUUUONCALL 



Harry Potter comes to an end 



Travis Lear 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s^twlear®clatinii,p(;)u 




"Harry Potter and the 
Deathly Hallows" 
J.K. Rowling 
Rating: 4.5/5 

♦♦♦♦ 

The moment of triumph 
or defeat has finally come 
for Harry Potter. It is the 
final showdown of good ver- 
sus evil, the Boy Who Lives 
versus Lord Voldemort. 

British author J.K. 
Rowling wraps up her sev- 
enth hook series with a nail- 
biting thriller that you will 
not want to put down. From 
beginning to end, Harry is 
faced with challenges, from 
confrontations with his best 
friend Ronald Weasley to 
facing Voldemort himself. 

Many readers who read 
the sixth book "The Half 
Blood Prince" complained 
that the book lacked excite- 
ment until the very end. 
There are no complaints 
about the seventh and final 
installment, "The Deathly 
Hallows." 

The action starts from 
page one and continues to 



the very end of the epic tale. 
With a darker writing 
style than the other six 
books, Rowling takes Harrv 
Ron and Hermione on a 
quest set forth by their 
deceased head master, 
Albus Dumbledore. The trio 
of heroes is on a search for 
Horcruxes, the objects in 
which Voldemort puts his 
soul into. Once they find 
and destroy all seven 
Horcruxes, Voldemort will 
be vanquished. 

Their journey takes 
them all over the United 
Kingdom. Durning their 
journeys they run into old 
friends and foes that make 
their journey long and diffi- 
cult. Many secrets are final- 
ly revealed and, ultimately, 
Harry has to face Voldemort 
for the final showdown. 
"One cannot live while the 
other survives." 

Through Harry's 

encounters and travels, he 
transforms into a young 
man at last. He realizes that 
there is no one left to protect 
him, since Sirius, 
Dumbledore and his parents 
have passed away. Harry is 
now left to battle Voldemort 
by himself for the first time 
in his life and in doing so 
Harry grows as a person, 

Harry, from age 11, took 
on a large burden and 
walked an unwavering hne 
towards greatness. While 
walking that line, Harry 
confronts the Dark Lord 
numerous times and each 
time narrowly escapes 
death. On his way to bat- 
tling Voldemort, Harry 
comes across three magical 
objects called the Deathly 




Page? 



Ping-Pong comes out in full 'Tury" 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s ,ll|)i]wri','ivi l.iiHiii cilii 



Hallows. If the possessor 
owns all three, they will be 
the Master of Death. Harry 
is torn between searching 
for the Horcruxes or the 
Hallows. 

Rowling said that in the 
final book many characters 
would die, and they did. 
Characters that the readers 
came to know and love, per- 
ished on the pages as they 
read them. Rowhng also 
rewards her readers by 
making allusions to the past 
books and answering many 
questions that were asked 
previously. 

Why did Snape kill 
Dumbledore? What are the 
Horcruxes and where are 
they? Who really is Albus 
Dumbledore? These are just 
some questions that will be 
answered by the time you 
finish reading the book. 

A decade has past since 
Rowling's first book, "The 
Sorcerers Stone," was pub- 
lished, and Rowling ended 
her series with a memorable 
book that is both tragic and 
optimistic. We are all sad to 
say adieu to Harry, but we 
are left with a feeling of clo- 
sure and finality. 




VMA's have no rhythm 



Ann Powers 

Los Angeles Times 



On Sunday, as televi- 
* sion's family hour gave way 
to raunchy prime time, a 
strange thing happened in 
living rooms across America. 
Britney Spears appeared on 
the annual MTV Video 
Music Awards in a sparkly 
black bikini, but the real 
disturbance developed dur- 
ing the two hours after her 
yawn of a comeback. 

People started twitch- 
ing, feeling nauseous, blink- 
ing uncontrollably; they 
reached for their remotes in 
a desperate struggle against 
information overload. The 
show's assault on coherence 
drove a music-loving nation 
to its knees. A rumor spread 
that the creators of 
Pokemon, the Japanese car- 
toon whose images once 
caused "television epilepsy' 
in scores of young children, 
had wrested control from 
the VMA's producers in 
some kind of plot to destroy 
the music industry once and 
for all. 

OK. that didn't really 
happen. The VMA's were 
meant to entertain viewers, 
not destroy their minds. But 
this sorry response to the 
Net-ification of entertain- 
ment — an attempt to create 
a television equivalent to an 
iPod playlist, with a little 
candid YouTube.com thrown 
in— failed in a most 
unpleasant way. 

The ceremony, newly 
relocated to the Palms casi- 
no in Las Vegas, was 
designed as a cyberextrava- 
ganza, multi tiered and 
remixable. The viewing 
experience only began with 
Sunday's live broadcast. It is 
unfolding now, on the net- 
work's Web site, where 
"remixed" versions of the 
program will feature artists' 
commentary, viewer- 

requested content and 
longer versions of the per- 
formances shown on televi- 
sion. 

That's great for those 



who want to stretch out 
their annual VMA's party 
until it frays and breaks. 
But by treating the televised 
ceremony as a sneak pre- 
view for what's available 
online, the show's producers 
did no one any favors. 

Few artists performed 
full songs during the show; 
the cameras cut away mid 
chorus. Award winners 
enjoyed little glory; the best 
new artist winner, the hip- 
hop group Gym Class 
Heroes, didn't even get a 
speech. The show's once- 
unpredictable patter was 
sliced to the bone, with only 
presenter Jamie Foxx going 
off script. "When a fistfight 
ensued between Pamela 
Anderson's exes, Tommy Lee 
and Kid Rock, the MTV 
jocks seized upon the news 
tidbit like a scrap of 
Styrofoam in a shipwreck. 

It didn't have to be this 
way. Raucous, surprising 
music filled the all-star 
"fantasy suites" hosted by a 
handful of stars. Cee-Lo 
Green of Gnaris Barkley 
fame laid claim to Prince's 
"Darling Nikki," with the 
Foo Fighters backing; 
Rihanna received a major 
boost from Fall Out Boy on 
her own "Shut Up and 
Drive." West, Lil' Wayne, 
Justin Timberlake and 
System of a Down singer 
Serj Tankian all showed off 
their considerable gifts— for 
a few seconds, that is, until 
the cameras cut away. 

As excitement swept 
through the casino-hotel's 
upper floors, the main 
event's few fully realized 
musical numbers came 
across as overwrought and 
confused. Chris Brown, the 
latest dynamo to reach for 
Michael Jackson's crown, 
showed incredible grace, but 
his routine (which included 
a brief appearance by 
Rihanna) lost focus halfway 
through. Alicia Keys shout- 
ed her way through her 
rock-tinged new single, "No 
One." mashing it up with 
George Michael's old hit 
"Freedom '90." Team 



Tim — Timberlake, 
Timbaland and Nelly 
Furtado— ended the pro- 
gram with a disappointingly 
rote medley of their recent 
hits . 

A rare head-turning 
moment transpired when 
Linkin Park performed 
"Bleed It Out," from its 
smash 2007 album, 
"Minutes to Midnight." The 
band played the song from 
beginning to end, with no 
tricks, no cutaways, no 
cameos from wandering fel- 
low celebs. Vocalists Mike 
Shinoda and Chester 
Bennington stole the fire of 
the fans screaming at their 
feet and threw it back out. It 
was basic rock 'n' roll. But 
within the distracting 
framework of the VMA's. it 
felt like a punch to the gut. 
Awards were also dis- 
tributed. Who won? Who 
cares? The list includes 



"Balls of Fury" 
Director: Robert Ben 
Garant 
Rating: 3/5 



The fast-paced, intense 
and even deadly world of 
underground ping-pong 
takes centerstage in the film 
"Balls of Fury." 

Dan Fogler stars in this 
outrageous comedy as 
washed up ping-pong prodi- 
gy Randy Daytona. 
Daytona, far removed from 
his glory days of ping-pong 
and still living with the 
embarassment of his humil- 
iating downfall at the '88 
Olympic Games, is working 
as a pitiful comedy act in a 
restaurant in Reno, Nv. 

Just as Daytona is fired 
from his job, FBI Agent 
Rodriguez offers him a 
secret mission through 
which he can get back into 
the game of ping-pong and 
prove that he is the best in 
the world, all while helping 
the FBI capture a danger- 
ous triad leader. 

Daytona's secret mis- 
sion involves infiltrating the 
secret world of the dark and 



dangerous triad leader 

Feng, who, coincidcntally. is 

the man who had Daytona's 

father murdered following 

his ping-pong downfall \U 

years before. PVng, who's 

face has never been seen by 

i the FBI, is staging the uiti 

' mate table teiuiis touriui 

ment in which the world's 

best players will face each 

other in sudden death 

matches. 

After 19 years away 
from competitive ping-pong, 
Daytona is more than a lit- 
tle rusty. In order to obtain 
the coveted golden paddle 
invitaticm to F'eng's tourna- 
ment, Daytona must .seek 
the help and spiritual guid- 
ance of the blind Mast(>r 
Wong and his beautiful 
niece, Maggie. Feng had 
been a trainee of Wong, but 
did not finish his training, 
which ulitmately proves to 
be his greatest weakness, 

Daytona works his way 
through seemingly impossi- 
ble training which culmi- 
nates in a battle against 
China Town's best player, 
known as the Dragon. Once 
he defeats this opponent, he 
has proven himself worthy 
of an invitation to Feng's 
prestigious tournament. 

Along with Wong and 
Rodriguez, Daytona travels 
to Feng's South American 
jungle hideout to compete in 
his ping-pong tournament. 
The competitors in the tour- 
nament soon realize that 
more than pride is at stake. 
This tournament is sudden 
death, which means that the 
loser of each match is exe- 
cuted. 

As the tournament pro- 
gresses, Daytona finds his 
old form and excels until 
there is only one opponent 




left to face. However, this 
opponent just happens to be 
the same man that he lost to 
ill the s.s Olympic Games. 

Befoii' this fiuiil match- 
up can take place, Feng dis- 
covers that bis tournament 
has been infiltrated by the 
FBI and he pushes the but- 
ton that will blow u|) his 
entire secret complex. As 
everyone tries to rush to 
satety, Daytona must take 
on Feng himself in the most 
outrageously dangerous 
game of ping-pong. The safe- 
ty of his friends and loved 
ones, as well as his pride 
and confidence in himself, 
hinge on this one match. 

Poor character develop- 
ment and timing issues 
break up the overall flow 
and humor of the film. Some 
of the moments that are 
meant to induce laughter 
just seem stupid and out of 
place. However, there are 
some shining moments of 
hilarity in the film and the 
overall premise is just crazy 
enough to make it work. 

Some of the fight scenes 
may seem cheesy and way 
too choreographed, but they 
go with the total corniness 
of the film. Overall, it's not a 
particularly terrible movie, 
but I think your time may 
be better spent going to see 
"Superbad" for the tenth 
time. 



The most epic religious 
debate of all time 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjdbuffone@clarion.edii 




Rihanna (video of the year, 
for "Umbrella"; she received 
her award from Mary J. 
Blige and the reclusive Dr. 
Dre, whose surfacing made 
for a bit of a thrill), 
Timberlake, Fall Out Boy, 
Beyonce and Shakira and 
an absent Fergie . Only 
Timberlake did anything 
interesting with his speech, 
praising Brown and chal- 
lenging MTV to "play more 
videos." 

As MTV seems happy to 
acknowledge, videos aren't 
for television anymore. Nor 
is music, perhaps. That may 
be fine. Revisiting the VMAs 
onhne, fans will find that 
complete Cee-Lo/Foo 

Fighters collaboration and 
plenty more to enjoy. The 
question remains, however, 
whether the network should 
even bother with this pro- 
gram next year. 

The VMA's have always 
been more about flash and 
mirrors, but its creators 
once believed in the power of 
their hoopla. Now, like 
Britney sleepwalking 

through her performance, 
MTV has given up on itself. 
MTV.com is the future. Go 
ahead, tune out. 



"Paul Meets 
Muhammad" 
Michael R. Licona 
Rating: 4/5 



Imagine if it was possi- 
ble to bring the Christian 
Apostle Paul and the 
Muslim prophet 

Muhammad back to life for 
the biggest religious debate 
of all time. In "Paul Meets 
Muhammad" by Michael R. 
Licona, that showdown isn't 
just possible, it happens. 

In a futuristic setting, 
technology allows for the 
two religious heavyweights 
to square off in very deep 
debate on whether the res- 
urrection of Jesus Christ 
actually occurred. The two 
religious icons are in holo- 
gram form, but look real to 
the naked eye. 



The debate of the mil- 
lennium takes place in a 
packed arena full of 
Musfims and Christians 
who are eager to claim victo- 
ry for their respected faiths. 
Both Paul and Muhammad 
are asked questions by a 
moderator and then the 
counter party is allotted 
time for a rebuttal. The 
atmosphere of the event 
compares to that of the 
Super Bowl because with 
every quality point made, 
the crowd goes wild for their 
favored idol. 

The argument seems to 
have a lasting theme, how- 
ever. If Jesus did not rise 
from the dead, then the 
Christian faith is false and 
if Jesus did in fact rise from 
the dead, then Islam is 
false. With so much on the 
line, this contest is heated 
and passionate. 

The majority of the book 
is in conversation form and 
very easy to read. The 
debate never goes stale and 
keeps the reader's attention 
the entire way through. Just 
when you think Paul has 
proved without a doubt that 
Jesus was resurrected, 
Muhammad comes back 
with a point of view that 
would blow even the 
staunchest of Christian 
minds. The debaters refer 
to both the Bible and the 
Qur'an frequently which 
gives spiritual merit to 
every aspect of the argu- 




ment. 

Granted that you hold 
back your present biases, it 
is more than likely that you 
will be asking yourself ques- 
tions that you never thought 
to ask before. Licona does a 
marvelous job in not show- 
ing any religious bias in the 
book so that the debate is a 
very fair one. 

1 recommend "Paul 
Meets Muhammad" for a 
Christian who wants to 
learn more about the 
Muslim religion or vice 
versa. This very readable 
book is also a great tool for 
those who are not sure of 
their religion and are look- 
ing for simple explanations 
of what both Christians and 
Muslims believe. 

So did Jesus indeed rise 
from the dead'? Or is it pos- 
sible that there is some 
other exjjlanation for what 
happened so very long ago? 
Keep an open mind, read 
"Paul Meets Muhammad" 
and decide for yourself 



^a you need 
some help using 
the library? 

Com ne of Carlson 
Ubrai J o open sessions! 



Keservations are recommended and can 
be made by calling Ms. Karen Sheesman 
at 393-1841. Tliese sessions meeJ in the 
Level 2 Instruction Lab in Carlson Library 
(Room # 201). For the class schedule and 
descriptions, visit 

www.clarion.edu/library/teachingscheduIe.shtml 
We hope to see you soon! 



Pages 



THE CLARION CALL 



September 13. 2007 



h 



ClissilMs 



k^k Ms, Trdvel, Eiiiplojoient, For Root, hmmk, and General ids 




Laken Apartments, fully 
furnished, utilities includ- 
ed, call Patty at 81 4-745- 
3121 or 229-1688 or See 
them at www.lakenapart- 
ments.net 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to cam- 
pus. See them at 
www.grayandcompany.net 
or call FREE Gray and Co. 
887-562-1020 

Two bedroom apartment 
one block from Becker 
available now. Two bed- 
room apartment one block 
from Becker available 
Spring. Contact Leona 
Dunkle 



Tutor needed for CIS 21 7 
in-home assistance pre- 
ferred 2 times a week for 2 
hours. Fay is excellent! 
Please call 814-226-0665 




Come meet the sisters of 
Sigma Alpha lota, womens 
music fraternity, Tuesday 
September 18, for chocolate 
fountain and mocktails. 6 
pm in uppper classroom of 
Marwick-Boyd. 

1 ' i JtiM W mw ;«pyn|iiW M P I« i .' ii ||Hl i m i »ni|i .iiii i»>M .»i » I ■ 

PERS0NA15 



Happy Birthdiiy TINA!! 



Life partner, 

I need you in my life. 


Antonio T said hi! 


please come visit soon. 
Bring Jose! 
Love, life partner. 


Missy- 
SHOTGUN!! 






HAPPY 2 1ST AMY! 


Aunt Chris, 

Skip "Stomp"' and come to 


Aunt Pat, 

1 miss you! Come back to 


ALF! 

-Steph 


my country! 


Dave, 


23 days until Penguins sea- 
son! 


Hi. 1 Love You. 
•Steph 


Sara- 

I miss you! Tell g-ma and 


Kimmer Ann, 
Can't wait till ALF! 




Spring Break 2008. Sell 
Trips, Earn Cash and Go 
Free. C,all for group dis- 
counts. Best Prices 
Guaranteed! 



mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm 



Go Steelers 



Congratuations Amy and 
Dom! 



Mr. Jones, 

Make my eggs with onions 

cheesy tomorrow? 

Josh, 

1 hate you. 

With love, Linds 



MONTANA 

FOR 

CLARION COUNTY 

AUDITOR 



www.andymontanaaudltor.com 

acemontana@ccybernet.com 

(814)226-7316 



Take the "Sex and the City" Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay Grystar 

1. Where is Carrie a columnist? 

a) New York Times b) The New York Observer 

c) New York Post d) Vogue 



vSV ^yt^ff^e City 

7{ow much do \jou kyiow amut the show? 



wfln A 



What does Samantha do for a living? 

a) Lawyer 

b) PR Executive 

c) Columnist 

d) Art Gallery owner 



3. Where does Mr. Big move? 

a) Florida b) California 
c) Boston d) Wisconson 



4. How many seasons has Sex and the City been on air? 
a) 3 b) 6 

c) 7 d) 10 



5. Which cast member's mother passes away? 
a) Carrie b) Mr. Big 

c) Miranda d) Samantha 



6. Who was Carrie engaged to? 

a) Mr. Big b) Mark 

c) She wasn't engaged d) Aiden 



7. According to Charlotte, how niany wMHSloves^ does 
one find? ! 

a) 1 b) 3 

c) 2 d) Unlimited 



8. What is Carrie's e-mail name? 

a) Sexpert b) SexnCity 

c) ShoeGal d) SexlOl 



9. What is Aiden's dogs name 

a) Spot 

b) Woof 

c) Pete 

d) Sparky 



10. What shoe size does Carrie wear? 
a) 7 b) 8 

c) 6 d) 7 1/2 

p-()I '3'6 '^'8 '■^'Z. 'P'9 ■^■Q 'qt 'q'C "q 'Z -q-lii^JaMSUV 



Place a classified with us! 



Cost is 10 cents per word with a 
$1.00 minimum. 



All classified ads must be submitted no 
later than 3 p.m. Wednesday the week 

of publication. Customers have the 

option of paying in cash or check when 

placing the ad, or the option of being 

billed at the end of the 

semester. 



To place a classified call 814-393'2380 
or fax us at 814-393-2667 



Classified may also be placed via email. Please 
email us at call@clarion.edu 



We also have classified ad forms which can be 

picked up at our office in 270 Gemmell on the 

bulletin board. Simply fill out your ad and 

place it in the classified drop-off folder 



The Clarion Call reserves the right to refuse ads which are question* 
able in content, or if the purchaser has a large outstanding debt. 




IZZI'S THURSDAY 
NIGHT Cj/f/w^ 

AH Day or Until We Run Out 

Sold by Half Dozen and Dozen Only!!!! 

(No Exceptions) 



P» US 750 DRA-TS 



CHECK OUT OUR OTHER DAILY SPECIALS! 



IZZI'S SPECIAL WING SPICES AND SAUCES 

•*Gold Fever • Honey BBQ • Honey Mustard 

•**Blazing Red Buffalo • Zesty Ranch 

•Original Season Salt • ^Spicy Cajun • **ltalian Joe's 

•***Five Alarm Volcanic • Dracula-Stopping Garlic 

Backyard BBQ • "Fireiiouse BBQ 

* HOT **HOT, HOT ***H0T, HOT, HOT! 

Celery and a side of dressing with your wing order wil be .50 extra 

Whole Wings: $3.55 a half dozen eat in 

Whole Wings: S4.05 a half dozen take out 

Wing Dings: $2.35 a half dozen eat in 

Wing Dings: $2.85 a half dozen take out 

Izzi'eS Qistorante 

Ci'cat Tc xi. i.oiuKe. ipiriU. Padic<i 

Open 7 days a week at 11 a.m. 

Rte. 322 East betv/een Clarion & Strattanville, 2 miles from Downtown Clarion 

814-764-5095 Smoking & Non-Snoking Dmu-.g Areas 







WCllB TV SCHEDULE: 9-17 TO 9-21-07 

ll: Lte Off Campus: Ch. 15 (Comcast) 

On Campus: Ch. 5 



WCUB-TV is back in adtidn this semester! Clarjon County's 
ONLY local television station has great programs t|is week, in- 
cluding the seoDnlwelc df the Golden Eagle Foofball Show, 
featuring Head Coach Jay Foster and hosted by Kelsey 
Schroyer. It airs Wednesday and Friday nights at 7:30 and 



.„aaM>-«ai«**"'; 



8:30. , 

Golden Eagle Football games are also back on the WCUB- 
TV alrw0ves-Golden Eagle Rewind will give you multiple 
chanceslto catch the team in adion, each Monday, Wednes- 
day, andlfrlda? at 2 and 9pm. Don't forgetjto check in every 
night at 1 pk. with WCUB-TV News, for all the latest News, 
Weathen aiid Sports. Stay Tuned! 



TIME/DAY 


MONDAY/9.17 


TUES./9-18 


WEDS./9-19 


THURSJ9-20 


FRIDAY/9.21 


2:00PM 


GOLDEN EAGLE 
REWIND: 
FOOTBALL; CU 
VS. TIFFIN -R 




GOLDEN EAGLE 
REWIND: 
FOOTBALL; CU 
VS. TIFFIN -R 




GOLDEN EAGLE 
REWIND: 
FOOTBALL; CU 
VS. TIFFIN -R 




5:00/6:00 


CAPITOL 
CONVERSATIONS 


FOCUS ON 
PA 


CAPITOL 
CONNECTION 


LEGISLATIVE 
REPORT 


FOCUS ON 
PA 


5:30 


DESTINATION 
TOMORROW 


DEST. 
TOMORROW 


DESTINATION 
TOMORROW 


DESTINATION 
TOMORROW 


DESTINATION 
TOMORROW 


6:30 


DESTINATION 

TOMRROW 

R 


OFF THE 

BENCH 

R 


DESTINATION 

TOMRROW 

R 


GOLDEN EAGLE F- 

BAii 

SHOW, 

'A?f€ADC0.ACHJ4Y 

FOSTER 

R 


SPORTSNIGHT 
R 


7:00/8:00 


WCUB-TV NEWS 
L 


WCUB-TV 

NEWS 

L 


WCUB-TV NEWS 
I 


WCUB-TV 
NEWS 

L 


WCUB-TV 
NEWS-L 


7:30/8:30P 
M 


OFF THE BENCH 
UR 


WCUB-TV 
NEWS 
R-7:30 
ONLY 


GOLUbNtAatf-BiU. 

SHOW. 

W.' HEAD COACH JAY 

FOSTER 

UR 


SPORTSNIGHT 
UR 


GOLISENEAGLEHWi 

SHOW 

'A? HEAD COACH MY 

FOSTER 

R 


9PM-12AM 


G,E,R:CUVS, 
KUTZTOWN-R 





G.E.R; CU VS. 
KUTZTOWN - R 





G.E.R; CU VS. 

KUTZTOWN-R 



rttia 






September 13. 2007 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



"UTTLEFIELD" contin- 
ued from page 10 

However, Littlefield 
does deserve some due. He 
was bold enough to trade 
away fan favorites Todd 
Ritchie and Brian Giles. In 
doing so, he landed players 
such as Kip Wells and Jason 
Bay who each strengthened 
the franchise. 

His willingness to sign 
free agents who were large- 
ly unwanted gave the 
Pirates valuable production 
in the unlikeliest of places. 
One of them, Jeff Suppan, 
pitched well for the Buccos 
before ultimately ending up 
being the key piece in the 
trade that brought Freddy 
Sanchez to Pittsburgh from 
the Boston Red Sox. 

This past season, 
Littlefield patiently outlast- 
ed the Atlanta Braves to 
acquire Adam LaRoche. 
The move not only strength- 



ened the Pirates lineup by 
giving them the left-handed 
bat they needed, it also 
effectively needed their sea- 
son. LaRoche gave the 2007 
Pirates some much -needed 
buzz that had been lacking. 

However, Dave 

Littlefield is no longer the 
general manager of the 
Pittsburgh Pirates, and 
there are many reasons 
why. 

For the many players 
that he brought in, many 
more have left the Steel 
City. Faced with financial 
restrictions, he traded third 
basemen Aramis Ramirez, 
arguably the best Pirates 
power prospect in quite 
.some time, along with 
Lofton to the Chicago Cubs 
for utility players Jose 
Hernandez and Bobby Hill, 
as well as a minor league 
pitcher. 

To add insult to injury, 
the Pirates even gave the 



Cubs money to help pay for 
Ramirez's contract. Little- 
field also didn't do himself 
any favors by signing Chris 
Stynes to replace Ramirez. 

In addition, he has also 
traded or let go All-Stars 
Chris Young and Gary 
Mathews Jr. for little or 
nothing. Former number 
one pitchers Kris Benson 
and Oliver Perez, were both 
traded to the New York Mets 
for Ty Wigginton and Xavier 
Nady respectively. In turn, 
Wigginton would struggle 
during his stay in 
Pittsburgh, never quite 
matching the success he had 
with the Mets. 

There have been free 
agent failures, gross mise- 
valuation of talent, and a 
too conservative approach in 
recent drafts that has left 
the lower levels of the 
Pirates farm system virtual- 
ly depleted. 

Ultimately for Little- 



field, it came down to him 
making too many mistakes 
for a franchise that could ill- 
afford them. In the world of 
professional sports, when 
your team loses over and 
over again, someone has to 
pay the price and leave 
town. Littlefield became 
just the latest casualty in 
the Pirates war of returning 
to contention. 

As the Pirates go on the 
hunt for a new GM, here's 
hoping his tenure proceeds 
more successfully than that 
of his two predecessors. 
Before that happens though, 
let's take the time to remem- 
ber Dave Littlefield, 
General Manager of the 
Pittsburgh Pirates, 2001- 
2007. Then let's thank 
goodness he's out of here 
and hope the new guy can 
fix the mess he has left 
behind. 



Soccer has off-day 
and loses at lUP 



Steelers dominate in Tomlin's debut 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser@clarlon.edu 

The Steelers ushered in 
the Mike Tomlin era in style 
Sunday with a 34-7 victory 
over the Cleveland Browns. 
For stretches of the game it 
looked as though the 
Steelers could do nothing 
wrong while Cleveland 
could do nothing right. 

Cleveland gave the 
Steelers several scoring 
opportunities early in the 
game with a barrage of 
turnovers and penalties. 

Ben Roethlisberger was 
able to quickly capitalize 
throwing two early touch- 
down passes and also lead- 
ing a field goal drive that 
had thg^Stfiglers .up 11 -(^^mn^ 
k| ocked Br owns starnhg' 
quarterBaclc Charlie Frye to 
the sideline before 
Cleveland knew what hit 
them. 

While the Steelers 
looked good and a 34-7 win 
is always nice to see, one 
thing must not be forgotten. 

It was only Cleveland. 

The Browns for all 
intents and purposes hand- 
ed the Steelers the game 
with five turnovers and 
allowing six sacks. Not only 
did Frye not make it to half- 
time but his performance 
cost him his spot on the 
team. Cleveland traded him 
to Seattle just two days 
later. Even Browns fans had 




Troy Polamalu and retired center Jeff Hartings stand on the side- 
line during a game last season. The Steelers play Buffalo on 
September 16. (The Clarion Ca///Archive Photo, Bethany Ross) 



turned on the team by the 
second quarter with chants 
of "Brady, Brady" in hopes of 
seeing rookie quarterback 
Brady Quinn enter the 
game. 

The Steelers may be 
really good, but it could also 
be that the Browns were 
just that bad. The black and 
gold were offered quite an 
opportunity by NFL sched- 
ule makers with the Browns 
being their opener followed 
by home games against 



Buffalo and San Francisco 
and a trip to Arizona. 

Those teams have com- 
bined to play in just three 
playoff games in this decade 
and they lost all of them. 
And while those teams may 
be on the rise with young 
and improving quarterbacks 
in place none seem to be 
legitimate playoff con- 
tenders juat yet. 

With odds in their favor 
like that the Steelers must 
capitalize and take advan- 



tage of being handed an 
easy opening schedule. Any 
team that sees a cupcake 
start to their schedule 
knows they must and usual- 
ly do take advantage of it 
unless of course you're the 
University of Michigan. 

The Steelers certainly 
have plenty of bright spots 
leaving the game against 
the Browns. Big Ben threw 
zero interceptions, some- 
thing he did in just five of 
the 14 games he played last 
year. 

The offensive line also 
factored into that by keep- 
ing Ben on his feet, giving 
him time to make quality 
throws and helping Willie 
Parker to yet another 100 
yard game on the ground. 
And lastly the defense creat- 
ed turnovers, got pressure 
on the quarterback record- 
ing six sacks and numerous 
hurries. 

The key for the Steelers 
this year is continuing this 
level of play all season, 
which really isn't likely. 
Even the best teams have 
bumps in the road along the 
way and the Steelers sched- 
ule near the end of the sea- 
son certainly makes up for 
the charitable opening to 
their season, but if they take 
care of the Appalachian 
State's on their schedule 
now a bump or two down the 
road won't be keeping the 
five-time Super Bowl 
champs from the playoffs 
this season. 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_tckovalovsOclarion.edu 

INDIANA, Sep 6 -After last 
year's tough 10-1 loss to lUP 
in their next to last game, 
the Golden Eagles looked for 
revenge last Thursday. 
Unfortunately, things didn't 
go as planned, as Clarion 
fell to lUP 11-0. 

The Golden Eagles had 
started out conference play 
with two promising victories 
defeating Lock Haven 21, 
and Cahfornia 1-0. Clarion 
then lost to first place 
Slippery Rock 2-0, before 
the lUP game. 

Clarion was never able 
to get out of an early deficit 
falling behind by three after 
only five minutes of play. 

The win gave lUP its 
first conference victory. The 
Crimson Hawks had a total 
of 30 shots to Clarion's 13. 

"Usually when a player 
has a bad game there is a 
team to help pick up the 
pieces, but unfortunately 
everyone had a bad game on 
the same day," said coach 
Nina Alonzo. 

Red Sox have plenty of 
incentive to own best record 



"We are aware of our 
mistakes, and plan not to 
have that happen again. It 
was an unlucky day for us at 
lUP and we hope to not 
place too much emphasis on 
that game as we prepare for 
two huge games on the road 
this week." 

Jill Miller, a freshman 
and the team's leading scor- 
er, has accumulated four 
points with two goals on 
seven shots thus far. 

Senior goalkeeper Jess 
Reed has played the majori- 
ty of the time in goal, post- 
ing a .821 save percentage, 
including one shutout 
against Cahfornia. 

The Golden Eagles were 
hampered with injuries la.st 
week, but have had nearly a 
week to recover before they 
play three games in six 
days. The biggest test of the 
three is against Edinboro on 
Monday. 

Edinboro is in the top 30 
nationally and tied with 
Clarion for second place in 
the PSAC-West Division. 
Clarion will have to wait 
until the next to last game 
for its shot at redemption 
against lUP on October 24. 



Jeff Goldberg 

The Hartford Courant 

BOSTON - The Red Sox 
have had the best record in 
the American League for 
most of the summer. If they 
can hang on over the final 
two and a half weeks, they 
can set their own playoff 
schedule. 

A new format instituted 
by Major Leagi-ie Baseball, 
gives the AL team the right 
to choose which of two best- 
of-five division series it 
wishes to play in, one that 
starts Oct. 3 and lasts eight 
days, or one that starts Oct. 
4 and lasts seven. The new 
format was first reported in 
Tuesday's New York Post. 

Because of the stag- 
gered format of the eight- 
day series, which would 
allow teams to use a three- 
man rotation on regular 
rest, it's hard to imagine the 
team with the best record 
not selecting it. 

And should the Yankees 
play the Angels in the short- 



er series, featuring as many 
as four cross-country flights, 
there would be extra incen- 
tive for the Red Sox to select 
the longer one. 

The Red Sox entered 
play Tuesday night with a 
two-game lead over 
Anaheim for the best record. 
Cleveland trailed Anaheim 
by a half-game for the sec- 
ond-best record and the 
right to play the Yankees, 
who led the wild card by 3 
1/2 games before entering 
Tuesday. 

Should the current 
standings hold. Division 
Series B would play Games 
1 and 2 in Boston Oct. 3 and 
5. Games 3 and 4 would be 
in Cleveland Oct. 7-8 and 
Game 5, if necessary, would 
be Oct. 10 in Boston. 

Division Series A would 
have Games 1 and 2 in 
Anaheim, Calif, Oct. 4-5, 
Games 3 and 4 in New York 
Oct. 7-8 and Game 5, if nec- 
essary, in Anaheim Oct. 10. 




Intramural Schedule 



F»II2007 


Reg. Due: 


BEACH VOLLEYBALL 


NOW 


OUTDOOR SOCCER 


NOW 


DODGEBALL 


NOW 


FUG FOOTBALL 


NOW 


VOLLEYBAa 


NOW 


ULTIMATE FRISBK 


NOW 


1 PITCH SOFTBALL 


NOW 


TENNIS 


NOW 


GOLF SCRAMBLE 


9/24 


FIELD GOAL CONTEST 


9/17 


10 K RELAY 


9/24 


POWER LIFTING 


9/25 


INDOOR SOCCER 


10/8 


1 ON 1 BASKETBALL 


10/9 


CHALLENGE COURSE 


10/15 


HORSESHOE PITCHING 


1002 


CLOSEST TO THE PIN 


10^3 


TUG OF WAR 


10/30 


3 ON 3 BASKETBALL 


10/31 


BIKE RACE 


10/31 


TABLE TENNIS 


11/5 


TUBE H20 BASKETBALL 


10/5 


BADMINTON 


10/6 


FREE THROW 


11/12 


WHIFFLEBALL 


11/12 


BIG BUCK CONTEST 


12/3 


Get more mfo on each event on-line: 


clarion.edu/intramurals 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Kne|>p - Intrtmural, Recreation, 8t Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Golf Scramble 

Monday 9/24 & Tuesday 9/25 
Clarion Oafcs Country Club 

CaN the course at 226-8888 to 
rKerve a tee twfne for your t«Mn. 
This is an 16 hole best bai scramble. 
CUP students golf for half price 
$ I ISO with cart INCLUDED. 
(Please follow aN course pokies.) 
To quaWy for the IM prize you must 
turn your completed scorecard into 
the Intramural offke by Wednesday, 
9/26 at noon. Teams are limited to 4 
players. In case of a tie» a scorecard 
pbyoffwiNbeused. 

Cook Forttt Rhftr Rid« to benefit 
the National MS Society is this 
Saturday, 9/15. Regstration sheets 
available at the REG Center. 

CLUB SPO R T S UPD ATE ; 

Ultimate Frisbee, Men's Rugby 
Women's Rugby, Roller Hockey 

Men's Volleyball 
These ckibs are aH gtvrv^ up to 
compete this faH. Stop by the REC 
Center for more ^formation. 



9-13-07 




IM Basketball MVPs Honored on Cereal Box! 




Chtlsty Grabigtl member of the 
Women's Champion **Shape Up" and 
Tournament MVP received a personaltzed 
Wheatkis box as part of her prize package! 

Find out details about e^ry ^>ort 
including rules, schedules and results. 

clarlan.edu/intramurais 

Or from the CUP home page: 

click on Athletks then Intramurals. 
(Regiaer On-Une, E-Mail questmns) 




Receiving the MVP award in the Men's Blue 

Division and his ovtm persor»l(zed Wheaties 

box was Nick Bnicker, member of the 

Bkie Division Champs - "C-lnvasion" 

United Way 5K Race 

Sauirday. 9/29 @ 9 a.m. 

Be one of the fr« 350 to register and get a 
free T-shirt. CUP students receive half price 
deal courtesy of the IM offKe!! 



Page 10 




Tlffi CLAMOir CJUX 



September 13. 2007 



Tota : follejyi off to hot start Footlal I drops to 0-2 



Volleyball team off to perfect 11-0 start after win over SRU 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sep 11 -Picking 
up where they left off last 
season, the Golden Eagles 
volleyball team has started 
the season on a hot streak. 
With their win IXiesday 
night against Slippery Rock, 
the Golden Eagles improved 
to a perfect 11-0. 

The Golden Eagles won 
the first game of the match 
30-26 before dropping a 30- 
23 decision in game two. 
However, Clarion rebound- 
ed to win the next two 
matches 30-23 and 30-24 
respectively. 

Overall this season, the 
Golden Eagles have only 
lost two games in their 11 
matches. Other than the 
loss to Slippery Rock. 
Clarion's only other taste of 
defeat came against 
Anderson at the Shippen- 
bsurg tournament in late 
August. 

With her team off to a 
great start, first year head 
coach Jennifer Harrison has 
been very pleased. 




The Golden Eagles volleyball team pictured above is a perfect 11-0 this season. Clarion will travel 
to Lock Haven on September 15. (The Clarion Ca/// Archive Photo, Bethany Ross) 



"I'm happy with the 
team's development so far. 
They are playing well as a 
team and have worked 
extremely hard to under- 
stand and work within our 
system," said Harrison. 

Harrison has a strong 
core of senior talent led by 
outside hitter Christina 
Steiner. 



Steiner, a Kentucky 
native was named PSAC- 
West Co-Player of the Week 
for September 11 to comple- 
ment the Player of the Week 
award she won last week. 
As of September 11, Steiner 
lead the Golden Eagles with 
150 kills, while fellow senior 
Sarah Fries held down the 
number two spot. 



Junior Amanda Anger 
meier is continuing her 
strong role from last year, 
currently third among all 
Golden Eagle hitters with 
76 kills. Anchoring the 
Golden Eagle spikers for the 
second straight year is 
Kristi Fiorillo. 

Coming into her second 
season as the setter for the 



Golden Eagles, Fiorillo has 
already logged 405 assists. 

Keeping with the senior 
theme, Vicky Gentile has 
continued to be a solid con- 
tributor. Recording her 
2,001st dig against Lees- 
McRae during the Carolina 
Challenge, Gentile became 
the Golden Eagles' all time 
dig leader surpassing the 
old record set bv Melanie 
Bull. 

In a statement to 
Clarion's athletic site, coach 
Jennifer Harrison noted 
that Gentile, '"has worked 
very hard for this record. 
The fact that she has start- 
ed since she was a freshmen 
says a lot about the type of 
player she is." 

Not to be outdone by 
their older counterparts, 
some of the younger Golden 
Eagles have made solid con- 
tributions. Freshmen mid- 
dle hitter Nicole Andrusz 
has stepped in to fill the 
void by the graduated 
Lauren Carter. 

In addition to compiling 
63 kills, good for fourth on 
the team, Andrusz has also 
logged 25 total blocks, sec- 



ond on the team behind fel- 
low freshmen middle hitter 
Sarah Sheffield. Sophomore 
Katie Aurand has also seen 
increased playing time as a 
defensive specialist and 
libero. 

The Golden Eagles are 
facing another tough PSAC- 
West schedule that includes 
Division II powerhouse Lock 
Haven as well as perennial 
contenders California and 
Indiana. 

However, Harrison feels 
that her team is well-pre- 
pared to meet these chal- 
lenges. 

"Our pre-season match- 
es have been a great start to 
preparing us for the confer- 
ence. We played several 
teams that have pushed us 
and made us focus on play- 
ing at a higher level," 
Harrison said. 

The Golden Eagles will 
be in action again this 
Saturday when they travel 
to Lock Haven for an after- 
noon match-up. They 
return to host California on 
September 18 at 7 p.m. 



Golden E agles football falls at hom e to Kutztown 35-13 

InrHan Qr<rithfidlH ^^»y~^B^^^W^MMMMMMMMMM||MMMW|gi)B^^ _... ,. , i 




Jordan Scrithfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscrithf@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sep 9 - On 
Saturday night, the Golden 
Eagles lost their second 
game of the season, falling 
to Kutztown 35-13. 

Kutztown quarterback 
Kyle Spotts went 14-25 for 
219 yards, with four touch- 
downs and two intercep- 
tions. 

On the other sideline, 
Tj'ler Huether, Clarion's 
quarterback, went 14-32 for 
197 yards, a touchdown, and 
three interceptions. 

Clarion got off to a 
decent start, tying the game 
at 7-7 on a Huether touch- 
down pass to Herb 
Carraway for 65 yards with 
1^05 remaining in the first 
quarter. 

After the first quarter, 
the Golden Bears put the 
game out of reach with a 10 
play, 80 yard drive capped 
on an 18 yard touchdown 

pass from Spotts to Alex 

Zukus midway through the The Golden Eagles seen in action against Tiffin University on September 1 In Clarion. The Golden Eagles lost the game 38-lo" 
second quarter. Clanon will travel to West Chester to take on the Golden Rams on September 15. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 

After a Clarion fumble, 

Elfen Quiles touchdown remaining in the first half yard field goal to cut the fare much better for the 

catch for a 21-7 lead. Golden Eagles kicker, halftime lead to 21-10. Golden Eagles. Their only 

With just three seconds Robert Mamula, nailed a 25- The second half didn't points in the half came on a 



Kutztown recovered on the 
Golden Eagles' 21 yard line, 
and capitalized with an 



32-yard field goal with 7:59 
remaining in the third quar- 
ter. 

After the field goal, 
Spotts found Will Brown on 
a post-pattern in the end 
zone for a 32 yard touch- 
down pass, putting 
Kutztown ahead 28-13. 
Later in the third quarter, 
Spotts hit Quiles for an 
eight-yard touchdown pass, 
Spotts' fourth of the night, 
to put Kutztown up 35-13. 

Clarion did beat the 
Golden Bears in a few offen- 
sive categories on Saturday 
night. The Golden Eagles 
had 316 offensive yards, to 
Kutz-town's 306, and 
Clarion had 21 first downs, 
to the Golden Bears' 18. 

Eddie Emmanuel, the 
Golden Eagles' starting run- 
ning back, rushed for 105 
yards on 20 carries. 

Clarion has averaged 
294.5 yards per game which 
ranks them ninth in the 
PSAC. 

The Golden Eagles, 
dropped to 0-2, and will 
travel to #23 ranked West 
Chester next Saturday at 1 
pni, while Kutztown impr- 
oved their record to 1-1, and 
will host Shippensburg 
Saturday at 3 pm. 



Littlefield's time was up 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.edu 

Like so many before 
him, he came to Pittsburgh 
with hope. Forget the years 
of losing, the reluctance of 
management to commit 
money to players. 

Never mind the fact the 
franchise he was coming to 
a fan base that largely stops 
caring as soon as the 
Steelers convene in Latrobe. 
He was going to change all 
that. 

He had the pedigree, 
and the recommendations 
from around baseball. 
However, like so many 
before him, David Littlefield 
left the Steel City amid a 
chorus of boos, the latest in 
a long line of baseball men 
who failed to turn around 
the fortunes of the 



Pittsburgh Pirates. 

His tenure began in the 
summer of 2001 . Replacing 
Cam Bonifay, Littlefield's 
job was to turn the Pirates 
into a contender, something 
they had not been in nearly 
ten years. His first trade 
came shortly after becoming 
General Manager. 

Faced with the possibili- 
ty of losing Jason Schmidt 
to free agency, Littlefield 
dealt Schmidt and outfield- 
er John Vander Wal to the 
San Francisco Giants for 
outfielder Armando Rios 
and pitcher Ryan Vogelsong, 

Schmidt went on to 
become the ace of the Giants 
staff while Vogelsong 
bounced between the start- 
ing rotation and bullpen, 
eventually winding up in 
Japan. 

see "LITTLEFIELD" on 
page 9 








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CALL 



Volume 94 Issue 2 



September 20, 2007 



CUP stu dents prepare for 54th Annual A.L.F. 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJmrichard®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 15 - As 
Clarion prepares for the 
54th Annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival (A.L.F.), the 
University is planning to be 
more involved in the festivi- 
ties throughout the week. 

The nine-day festival 
has become one of the most 
anticipated events of the 
year for community mem- 
bers and students alike, as 
well as a major tourist 
attraction to Clarion. 

The festival has been a 
consistent part of the town's 
history and is one of its most 
prominent events since 
1953. 

According to Maria 
D'Ascenzo, the Special 
Events Chair of the 
University Activities Board, 
the Clarion Area Chamber 
of Commerce greatly wants 
students to become more 
involved in A.L.F. Most 
notably, the Chamber of 
Commerce is hoping more 
student organizations will 
become involved in the 
parade. 

"We have a lot of stu- 
dent participation this year 
for the parade and a lot of 
organizations are getting 
involved," said D'Ascenso. 
"Normally it has just been 
the Greek fraternities and 
sororities in the parade, but 
we want other student 
organizations on campus to 
get involved in the parade 
as well. 

D'Ascenzo said, " It's one 
of the first steps to getting 
A.L.F. back to the way it 
used to be and we're really 
excited about it." 



The organizations that 
currently have floats in the 
parade are Delta Zeta, 
Alpha Sigma Tau, Alpha Psi 
Omega, Delta Phi Epsilon, 
Phi Mu Alpha, Sigma Sigma 
Sigma, Relay For Life, Phi 
Sigma Sigma, and Interhall 
Council. 

At the moment, 
D'Ascenzo is unsure as to 
which organizations will 
have stands during the 
A.L.F., though she expects 
that there will be many dif- 
ferent organizations 
involved. 

Clarion University's local 
radio station, WCUC 91.7 
FM, also became involved in 
this year's festival. On 
Tuesday, Oct. 2 the radio 
station will host WCUC 
Day The station will 
have a table set up in the 
gazebo at Memorial Park, 
across the street from the 
Clarion County Courthouse. 
Live broadcasts from the 
gazebo will be conducted 
during parts of the day and 
station items will be given 
away, as well as donated 
items from the community. 

"'It is basically to have a 
presence in the community 
during the A.L.F Festival," 
said mass media arts and 
journalism and communica- 
tion studies professor 
WilHam Adams. "It 

enhances our visibility and 
connects the station to our 
listeners and it also gives 
listeners a chance to see the 
on-air personalities. Plus, 
they can listen to our music 
in the park as they visit the 
food vendors during the 
day." 

Clarion University 
began some of their prelimi- 
nary festivities this week 



with homecoming court vot- 
ing on Monday through 
Wednesday. 

The king and queen will 
be announced on Thursday, 
Oct. 4 at a pep rally for the 
festival. 

Two females and two 
males from the freshman, 
sophomore, and junior class 
are selected as the home- 
coming court, as well as 
three females and three 
males of the senior class. 
(See graphic at right for 
2007 court members.) 

Court members will 
appear in the A.L.F. parade 
and will also judge the deco- 
rations in the residence 
halls. 

Those interested in 
learning more about the 
scheduled events for this 
year's A.L.F should look for 
information on the event's 
Web site, httpV/www.clari- 
onpa.com/alf/index.htm. 

The National City 
Autumn Leaf Festival has 
its origins in the Clarion 
State College Homecoming 
of 1953. Local businesses 
were asked to decorate their 
shops to add a touch of color 
to the town. 

The following year, the 
Clarion Area Chamber of 
Commerce decided to hold a 
larger festival to attract 
more people. Two parades 
were offered, including vet- 
erans, Girl Scouts, volun- 
teer firemen, the Lions' 
Club, the Autumn Leaf 
Queen's float and seven 
Clarion County bands. 

From the first A.L.F. in 
1953, the festival has con- 
tinued to evolve into the 
much anticipated event that 
it is today. 




QiMck McKay Brian Perkins 
tiaunDonaW Michael Ncely 
Banny DIveh&y 



Sean MalmMftrtng 
Clay Nolan 



Aaron Swanlek 
Rk:hEckert 



Lingwall conducts PR panel in Pittsburgli 



■Mi 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyorieclarlon.edu 




Dr. Andrew Lingwall 



CLARION, Sept. 18 - CUP 
associate professor of mass 
media arts and journalism 
and communication studies 
Dr. Andrew Lingwall will 
conduct a discussion panel 
in Pittsburgh, Pa, concern- 
ing ethics of environmental 
public relations. 

"Perception is our reali- 
ty," said Lingwall in regards 
to the panel topic that he 
will be a part of on Friday, 
September 28. 

Lingwall, who is the 
Ethics Chair for the Public 
Relations Society of America 
Pittsburgh's board of direc- 
tors, is conducting a discus- 
sion panel at Point Park 
University. 

The Pittsburgh chapter 



of the Public Relations 
Society of America (PRSA) 
will be hosting a panel of 
national experts, which will 
discuss environmental 
ethics and the complex chal- 
lenges faced by public rela- 
tions (PR) practitioners. 

"It's a diverse panel," 
Lingwall said. 

The panel will include 
three national experts 
including: Cissy Bowman, 
the Public Relations 
Manager for Mount 
Lebanon School District; 
James Dietz, Vice President 
of Flextronics, Inc.; and 
David Mashek,who is 
involved with counseling 
firms with environmental 
issues and problems with 
W.J. Green and Associates. 
The panel discussion, 
'The Ethics of Being Green: 
Where Do We Start?" is 
going to focus on some spe- 
cific points such as how PR 
professionals can make deci- 
sions and policies that are 
ethically responsible to the 
environment, and urge 
clients and employers to do 
the same; challenges involv- 
ing clients with issues hav- 
ing the potential to impact 
the environment or public 
health, including legal, reg- 
ulatory and ethical balances 



when handling real or per- 
ceived concerns about the 
environment; and approach- 
es for dealing with clients or 
employers that do not 
appear to adhere to high 
ethical standards with 
respect to the environment." 
Lingwall indicated that the 
panel will be driven by ques- 
tions from the audience. 

Lingwall said, "We have 
to mesh real world require- 
ments in with the need to be 
green." 

He decided on the theme 
because it is a hot election 
issue and was important 
ethically. He also indicated 
that he felt the topic was 
obvious and timely. 

"Ethics isn't just about 
treating each other well, it's 
about treating nature well," 
Lingwall said. 

Students from Clarion 
University's Chapter of the 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PRSSA) 
will be attending the discus- 
sion. 

" It is a huge advantage 
to have our advisor so 
involved in PRSA ... being a 
member of panels such as 
this not only sharpens 
skills, but keeps individuals 
current with PR issues that 
are taking place," said 



Clarion University PRSSA 
chapter Vice President of 
Public Relations, senior 
Natalie Kennell. "He can 
share his experiences as a 
participant in these kind of 
events and bring that into 
not just the classroom, but 
our individual chapter." 

Kennell said she encour- 
ages PRSSA members to 
take advantage of any type 
of seminar or conference 
they can. 

"It not only informs our 
members of some important 
issues in our field, but these 
events are also great net- 
working opportunities," 
Kennell said. 

Registration informa- 
tion can be obtained 
through Lingwall by e-mail, 
alingwall@clarion.edu . 

All Clarion University 
students, faculty, and staff 
are able invited to attend if 
registered by Monday, Sept. 
24. 

The cost of PRSA mem- 
bers is $15 and for PRSSA 
members is $10. The regis- 
tration fee for all others is 
$20. 

The Clarion University 
chapter of PRSSA will host 
Lingwall as a featured 
speaker during an upcoming 
meeting. 



Rendell names Zellers 
CUP student trustee 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjeerickson©clarlon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 19 -Senior 
history major Aimee Zellers 
was recently named student 
trustee of the Clarion 
University Board of 
Trustees. 

Zellers' position was offi- 
cially announced by Gov. Ed 
Rendell. 

As student trustee, 
Zellers will uphold the 
duties such as making rec- 
ommendations, evaluating, 
reviewing , approving, and 
participating in planning 
efforts for personal fiscal 
affairs, academic policy, 
strategic planning, student 
affairs and facihties man- 
agement. 

"I sought this position 
for two reasons," said 
Zellers. "On a professional 
level, I can create and main- 
tain a good working rela- 
tionship and enhance com- 
munication between the 
Board of Trustees and the 
students of Clarion 
University. On an individ- 
ual level, this position will 
help to hone my interper- 



sonal administrative skills 
which will benefit me as a 
future graduate student and 
professional." 

Zellers will hold the position 
of Trustee until she gradu- 
ates in May 2008. 

Zellers' first interview 
was with a panel of Clarion 
University administrators 
and students. She advanced 
and her second interview 
was with President Joseph 
Grunenwald. The final part 
of the process was a tele- 
phone interview with a com- 
mittee from the Office of the 
Chancellor of the State 
System of Higher 
Education. 

During this past sum- 
mer, Zellers did an intern- 
ship with the Department of 
Justice Criminal Division, 
Office of International 
Affairs in Washington D.C. 
Her job during the intern- 
ship was a Paralegal on 
Extradition and Mutual- 
Legal Prosecution. She 
chose this for her internship 
because she has an interest 
in the law field. 

Zellers intends to pur- 
sue law or history after 
graduation. 



Page 10 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 13. 2007 



Sfirts 



Ml: lollciyiulfloliiihlarl 



Fuolbitll ilnip\ Id \)i 




DAB hosts annual 
fish bowl event 





Guitar Hero craze 
grows with release 
of third version 




Soccer ties 
Edlnboro, 2-2 



Volleyball team off to perfect 11-0 start after win over SRU 



One copy free 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s.kgschroyer@clarion.eclu 

CLARION. Sep ll-FickinK 
up wht'i'e they left off last 
season, the Golden Eagles 
volleyball team has started 
the season on a hot streak. 
With their win Tuesday 
tuj^ht against Slippery Rock, 
the (loldon Eagles improved 
to a perfect ll-O. 

The Golden Eagles won 
the first game of the match 
:50-26 before dropping a 30- 
23 decision in game two. 
However. Clarion rebound- 
ed to win the next two 
matches 30-23 and 30-24 
respectively. 

Overall this season, the 
Golden Eagles have only 
lost two games in their 11 
matches. Other than the 
loss to Slippery Rock, 
Clarion's only other taste of 
defeat came against 
Anderson at the Shippen- 
bsurg tournament in late 
August. 

With her team off to a 
great start, first year head 
coach Jennifer Harrison has 
been very pleased. 




The Golden Ldgles volle>ball team pictured above is a perfect 11-0 this season. Clarion will travel 
to Lock Haven on September 15. (The Clarion Ca///Archive Photo, Bethany Ross) 



"rm happy with the 
team's development so far. 
They arc playing well as a 
team and have worked 
extremely hard to under- 
stand and work within our 
system," said Harrison. 

Harrison has a strong 
core of senior talent led by 
outside hitter Christina 
Steiner. 



Steiner, a Kentucky 
native was named PSAC- 
West Co-Player of the Week 
for September 11 to comple- 
ment the Player of the Week 
award she won last week. 
As of September 11, Steiner 
lead the Golden Eagles with 
150 kills, while fellow senior 
Sarah Fries held down the 
numbei' two spot. 



Junior Amanda Anger 
meier is continuing her 
strong role from last year, 
currently third among all 
Golden Eagle hitters with 
76 kills, Anchoring the 
(■lolden Eagle spikers for the 
second straight year is 
Kristi Fiorillo. 

Coming into her second 
sea.son as the setter for the 



Golden Eagles. Fiorillo has 
already logged 405 assists. 

Keeping with the senior 
theme. Vicky Gentile has 
continued to be a solid con- 
tributor. Recording her 
2,001st dig against Lees- 
McRae during the Carolina 
Challenge, Gentile became 
the Gulden Eagles" all time 
dig leader surpassing the 
old record set by Melanie 
Bull. 

In a statement to 
Clarion's athletic site, coach 
Jeiuiifer Harrison noted 
that Gentile, "has worked 
very hard for this record. 
The fact that she has start- 
ed since she was a freshmen 
sa\s a lot about the type of 
player she is." 

Not to be outdone by 
their older counterparts, 
some of the younger Golden 
Eagles have made solid con- 
tributions. Freshmen mid- 
dle hitter Nicole Andrusz 
has stepped in to fill the 
void by the graduated 
Lauren Carter. 

In addition to compiling 
63 kills, good for fourth on 
the team, Andrusz has also 
logged 25 total block.s, sec- 



ond on the team behind fel- 
low freshmen middle hitter 
Sarah Sheffield. Sophomore 
Katie Aurand has also seen 
increased playing time as a 
defensive specialist and 
libero. 

The Golden Eagles are 
facing another tough PSAC- 
West scheduh^ that includes 
Division II powerhouse Lock 
Haven as well as perennial 
contenders California and 
Indiana. 

However, Harrison feels 
that her team is well-pre- 
pared to meet these chal- 
lenges. 

"Our pre-sea.son match- 
es have been a great start to 
preparing us for the confer- 
ence. We played several 
teams that have pushed us 
and made us focus on play- 
ing at a higher level," 
Harrison said. 

The Golden Eagles will 
be in action again this 
Saturday when they travel 
to Lock Haven for an after- 
noon match-up. They 
return to host California on 
September 18 at 7 p.m. 



Golden Eagles football falls at home to Kutztown 35-13 



Jordan Scrithfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscrithf@clanon.edu 

CLARION, Sep 9 - On 
Saturday night, the Golden 
Eagles lost their second 
game of the season, falling 
to Kutztown 35-13. 

Kutztown quarterback 
Kyle Spotts went 14-25 for 
219 yards, with four touch- 
dow'ns and two intercep- 
tions. 

On the other sideline, 
Tyler Huether, Clarion's 
quarterback, went 14-32 for 
197 yards, a touchdown, and 
three interceptions. 

Clarion got off to a 
decent start, tying the game 
at 7-7 on a Huether touch- 
dow-n pass to Herb 
Carraway for 65 yards with 
i:05 remaining in the first 
quarter. 

After the first quarter 
the Golden Bears put the 
game out of reach with a 10 
play, 80 yard drive capped 
on an 18 yard touchdown 
pass from Spotts to Alex 
Zukus midway through the 
second quarter 

After a Clarion fumble, 
Kutztown recovered on the 
Golden Eagles' 21 yard line, 
and capitalized with an 




The Golden Eagles seen in action against Tiffin University on September 1 in Clarion. The Golden Eagles lost the game 38-10. 
Clanon will travel to West Chester to take on the Golden Rams on September 15. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 



Elfen Quiles touchdown 
catch for a 21-7 lead. 

With just three seconds 



remaining in the first half 
Golden Eagles kicker, 
Robert Mamula, nailed a 25- 



yard field goal to cut the 
halftime lead to 21-10. 
The second half didn't 



fare much better for the 
Golden Eagles. Their only 
points in the half came on a 



32-yard field goal with 7:59 
remaining in the third quar- 
ter 

After the field goal, 
Spotts found Will Brown on 
a post-pattern in the end 
zone for a 32 yard touch- 
down pass, putting 
Kutztown ahead 28-i;3. 
Later in the third quarter. 
Spotts hit Quiles for an 
eight-yard touchdown pass, 
Spotts' fourth of the night, 
to put Kutztown up 35-13, 

Clarion did beat the 
Golden Bears in a few offen- 
sive categories on Saturday 
night. The Golden Eagles 
had 316 offensive yards, to 
Kutz-town's 306, and 
Clarion had 21 first downs, 
to the Golden Bears' 1 8. 

Eddie Emmanuel, the 
Golden Eagles' starting run- 
ning back, rushed for 105 
yards on 20 carries. 

Clarion has averaged 
294.5 yards per game which 
ranks them ninth in the 
PSAC. 

The Golden Eagles, 
dropped to 0-2, and will 
travel to #23 ranked West 
Chester next Saturday at 1 
pni. while Kutztown impr- 
oved their record to 1-1, and 
will host Shippensburg 
Saturday at 3 pm. 



Littlefield's time was up 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.edu 

Like so many before 
him, he came to Pittsburgh 
with hope. Forget the years 
of losing, the reluctance of 
management to commit 
money to players. 

Never mind the fact the 
franchise he was coming to 
a fan base that largely stops 
caring as soon as the 
Steelers convene in Latrobe. 
He was going to change all 
that. 

He had the pedigree, 
and the recommendations 
from around baseball. 
However, like so many 
before him, David Littlefield 
left the Steel City amid a 
chorus of boos, the latest in 
a long line of baseball men 
who failed to turn around 
the fortunes of the 



Pittsburgh Pirates. 

His tenure began in the 
summer of 2001 . Replacing 
Cam Bonifay, Littlefield's 
job was to turn the Pirates 
into a contender, something 
they had not been in nearly 
ten years. His first trade 
came shortly after becoming 
General Manager. 

Faced with the possibili- 
ty of losing Jason Schmidt 
to free agency, Littlefield 
dealt Schmidt and outfield- 
er John Vandcr W'al to the 
San Francisco Giants for 
outfielder Armando Rios 
and i)itcher Ryan Vogelsong. 

Schmidt went on to 
become the ace of the (Jiants 
staff while Vogelsong 
bounced between the start- 
ing rotation and bullpen, 
eventually winding up in 
Japan. 

see "LITTLEFIELD" on 
page 9 




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THECL 




NCALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 94 Issue 2 



September 20, 2007 



CUP students prepare for 54th Annual A.LF. 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmrichard@clanon.edu 

CLARION, Sept 15 - As 
Clarion prepares for the 
54th Annual Autumn Leaf 
Festival (A.L.F.). the 
University is planning to be 
more involved in the festivi- 
ties throughout the week. 

The nine-day festival 
has become one of the most 
anticipated events of the 
year for community mem- 
bers and students alike, as 
well as a major tourist 
attraction to Clarion. 

The festival has been a 
consistent part of the town's 
history and is one of its most 
prominent events since 
1953. 

According to Maria 
D'Ascenzo, the Special 
Events Chair of the 
University Activities Board, 
the Clarion Area Chamber 
of Commerce greatly wants 
students to become more 
involved in A.L.F. Most 
notably, the Chamber of 
Commerce is hoping more 
student organizations will 
become involved in the 
parade. 

"We have a lot of stu- 
dent participation this year 
for the parade and a lot of 
organizations are getting 
involved," said D'Ascenso. 
"Normally it has just been 
the Greek fraternities and 
sororities in the parade, but 
we want other student 
organizations on campus to 
get involved in the parade 
as well. 

D'Ascenzo said, " It's one 
of the first steps to getting 
A.L.F. back to the way it 
used to be and we're really 
excited about it." 



The organizations that 
currently have floats in the 
parade are Delta Zeta, 
Alpha Sigma Tau, Alpha Psi 
Omega, Delta Phi Epsilon, 
Phi Mu Alpha. Sigma Sigma 
Sigma, Relay For Life, Phi 
Sigma Sigma, and Interhall 
Council. 

At the moment, 
D'Ascenzo is unsure as to 
which organizations will 
have stands during the 
A.L.F., though she expects 
that there will be many dif- 
ferent organizations 
involved. 

Clarion University's local 
radio station, WCUC 91.7 
FM, also became involved in 
this year's festival. On 
Tuesday, Oct. 2 the radio 
station will host WCUC 
Day. The station will 
have a table set up in the 
gazebo at Memorial Park, 
across the street from the 
Clarion County Courthouse. 
Live broadcasts from the 
gazebo will be conducted 
during parts of the day and 
station items will be given 
away, as well as donated 
items from the community. 

"It is basically to have a 
presence in the community 
during the A.L.F. Festival," 
said mass media arts and 
journalism and communica- 
tion studies professor 
William Adams. "It 

enhances our visibility and 
connects the station to our 
listeners and it also gives 
listeners a chance to see the 
on-air personalities. Plus, 
they can listen to our music 
in the park as they visit the 
food vendors during the 
day." 

Clarion University 

began some of their prelimi- 
nary festivities this week 



with homecoming court vot- 
ing on Monday through 
Wednesday. 

The king and queen will 
be announced on Thursday, 
Oct. 4 at a pep rally for the 
fe.stival. 

Two females and two 
males from the freshman, 
sophomore, and junior class 
are selected as the home- 
coming court, as well as 
three females and three 
males of the senior class. 
(See graphic at right for 
2007 court members.) 

Court members will 
appear in the A.L.F. parade 
and will also judge the deco- 
rations in the residence 
halls. 

Those interested in 
learning more about the 
scheduled events for this 
year's A.L.F. should look for 
information on the event's 
Web site, httpV/www.clari- 
onpa.com/alf/index.htm. 

The National City 
Autumn Leaf Festival has 
its origins in the Clarion 
State College Homecoming 
of 1953. Local businesses 
were asked to decorate their 
shops to add a touch of color 
to the town. 

The following year, the 
Clarion Area Chamber of 
Commerce decided to hold a 
larger festival to attract 
more people. Two parades 
were offered, including vet- 
erans. Girl Scouts, volun- 
teer firemen, the Lions' 
Club, the Autumn Leaf 
Queen's float and seven 
Clarion County bands. 

From the first A.L.F. in 
1953, the festival has con- 
tinued to e\olve into the 
much anticipated event that 
it is today. 




Ariel Weaver Katie Cooper 



Ashley Crook Brittnee Koebler 



Melissa Gearing 
Justine Ailaway 



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Ashi^ Super 



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__--.- 








Brian Perlcins 


Sean Mainwaring 


Aaron Swanleic 


Shaun Donald 


Michael Neety 


Clay Nolan 


Rich Eckert 


Danny DIveley 









LIngwall conducts PR panel in Pittsburgh Re„deii names Zeliers 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyori@clarion.edu 




Dr. Andrew LIngwall 

CLARION, Sept. 18 - CUP 
associate professor of mass 
media arts and journalism 
and communication studies 
Dr. Andrew Lingwall will 
conduct a discussion panel 
in Pittsburgh, Pa, concern- 
ing ethics of environmental 
public relations. 

"Perception is our reali- 
ty," said Lingwall in regards 
to the panel topic that he 
will be a part of on Friday, 
September 28. 

Lingwall, who is the 
Ethics Chair for the Public 
Relations Society of America 
Pittsburgh's board of direc- 
tors, is conducting a discus- 
sion panel at Point Park 
University. 

The Pittsburgh chapter 



of the Public Relations 
Society of America (PRSA) 
will be hosting a panel of 
national experts, which will 
discuss environmental 
ethics and the complex chal- 
lenges faced by public rela- 
tions (PR) practitioners. 

"It's a diverse panel," 
Lingwall said. 

The panel will include 
three national experts 
including: Cissy Bowman, 
the Public Relations 
Manager for Mount 
Lebanon School District; 
James Dietz. Vice President 
of Flextronics, Inc.: and 
David Mashek,who is 
involved with counseling 
firms with environmental 
issues and problems with 
W.J. Green and Associates. 

The panel discussion, 
"The Ethics of Being Green: 
Where Do We Start?" is 
going to focus on some spe- 
cific points such as how PR 
professionals can make deci- 
sions and policies that are 
ethically responsible to the 
environment, and urge 
clients and employers to do 
the same; challenges involv- 
ing clients with issues hav- 
ing the potential to impact 
the environment or public 
health, including legal, reg- 
ulatory and ethical balances 



when handling real or per- 
ceived concerns about the 
environment; and approach- 
es for dealing with clients or 
employers that do not 
appear to adhere to high 
ethical standards with 
respect to the environment." 
Lingwall indicated that the 
panel will be driven by ques- 
tions from the audience. 

Lingwall said, "We have 
to mesh real world require- 
ments in with the need to be 
green." 

He decided on the theme 
because it is a hot election 
issue and was important 
ethically He also indicated 
that he felt the topic was 
obvious and timely. 

"Ethics isn't just about 
treating each other well, it's 
about treating nature well," 
Lingwall said. 

Students from Clarion 
University's Chapter of the 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PRSSA) 
will be attending the discus- 
sion. 

" It is a huge advantage 
to have our advisor so 
involved in PRSA ... being a 
member of panels such as 
this not only sharpens 
skills, but keeps individuals 
current with PR issues that 
are taking place," said 



Clarion University PRSSA 
chapter Vice President of 
Public Relations, senior 
Natalie Kennell. "He can 
share his experiences as a 
participant in these kind of 
events and bring that into 
not just the classroom, but 
our individual chapter." 

Kennell said she encour- 
ages PRSSA members to 
take advantage of any type 
of seminar or conference 
they can. 

"It not only informs our 
members of some important 
issues in our field, but these 
events are also great net- 
working opportunities," 
Kennell said. 

Registration informa- 
tion can be obtained 
through Lingwall by e-mail, 
alingwall(<iclarion.edu. 

All Clarion University 
students, faculty, and staff 
are able invited to attend if 
registered by Monday. Sept. 
24. 

The cost of PRSA mem- 
bers is $15 and for PRSSA 
members is $10. The regis- 
tration fee for all others is 
$20. 

The Clarion University 
chapter of PRSSA will host 
Lingwall as a featured 
speaker during an upcoming 
meeting. 



CUP student trustee 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjeerickson@clarion.edLi 

CLARION, Sept. 19 -Senior 
history major Aimee Zeliers 
was recently named student 
trustee of the Clarion 
University Board of 
Trustees. 

Zeliers' position was offi- 
cially announced by Gov. Ed 
Rendell. 

As student trustee, 
Zeliers will uphold the 
duties such as making rec- 
ommendations, evaluating, 
reviewing . approving, and 
participating in planning 
efforts for personal fiscal 
affairs, academic policy, 
strategic planning, student 
affairs and facilities man- 
agement. 

"I sought this position 
for two reasons," said 
Zeliers. "On a professional 
level, I can create and main- 
tain a good working rela- 
tionship and enhance com- 
munication between the 
Board of Trustees and the 
students of Clarion 
University. On an individ- 
ual level, this position will 
help to hone my interper- 



sonal administrative skills 
which will benefit me as a 
future graduate student and 
professional." 

Zeliers will hold the position 
of Trustee until she gradu- 
ates in May 2008. 

Zeliers' first interview 
was with a panel of Clarion 
University administrators 
and students. She advanced 
and her second interview 
was with President Joseph 
Grunenwald. The final part 
of the process was a tele- 
phone interview with a com- 
mittee from the Office of the 
Chancellor of the State 
System of Higher 

Education. 

During this past sum- 
mer, Zeliers did an intern- 
ship with the Department of 
Justice Criminal Division, 
Office of International 
Affairs in Washington D.C. 
Her job during the intern- 
ship was a Paralegal on 
Extradition and Mutual- 
Legal Prosecution. She 
chose this for her internship 
because she has an interest 
in the law field. 

Zeliers intends to pur- 
sue law or history after 
graduation. 



Page 2 



Tlffi CLA810H CALL 



September 20. 2007 



kws 



Senate appoints new senator 



Donald Baum 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s dwbaum®clarion.edu 




CLARION, Sept. 17 - The 
CUP student senate held 
their third meeting of the 
fall semester Monday, Sept. 
17 in room 146 of the 
Gemmell Student Complex. 

Senator Dave Durney 
resigned and the second 
alternative, Lacey 

Klingensmith, was appoint- 
ed. 

Changes made to the 
student senate Constitution 
last semester are awaiting 
approval of Clarion 
University President, 

Joseph P. Grunenwald. 

The meeting started 
with a roll call of the stu- 
dent senators and a review 
of the minutes. 

Student Sub- 



Committees were appointed 
including the Student 
Facilities Committee. 

The Student Facilities 
Committee will be com- 
prised of 15 students who 
will offer advice as to what 
they would like to see 
offered by the University 
book store located in the 
Gemmell Student Complex 
among other buildings. 

Representatives were 
appointed to the committees 
of Election Advertising Sub 
Committee, Housing 

Committee, Committee on 
Rules and Regulations, 
Safety and Environmental 
Concerns Committee among 
others. 

Key discussions includ- 
ed the accounting club and 
the Hip-Hop Symposium. 
Student senate approved 
allocation of $2,660.40 to 
the accounting club to 
attend the annual IMA 
Conference and an addition- 
al $2000 was donated from 
the student senate budget to 
the Hip-Hop Symposium to 
be used for the purpose of 
acquiring guest speakers. 

Further discussions 
included the Clarion 
University's Brand 

Marketing Initiative. 



The University is cur- 
rently looking for 9 to 12 
students to participate in 
two 90-minute focus groups. 

The focus groups are to 
be used as part of Clarion 
University's Brand 

Marketing Initiative. The 
focus groups will also 
include faculty members, 
alumni, administrators and 
staff. 

The purpose of the focus 
groups is to review compiled 
information from student 
feedback into a series of 
brand "value statements." 

By updating the 
University's image, Clarion 
University will enhance its 
ability to compete with 
other higher learning insti- 
tutions, improving the 
quantity and quality of 
applicants to Clarion 
University. 

A total of 18 to 24 stu- 
dents are needed to partici- 
pate in the two discussion 
groups. 

The sessions will be held 
in the Gemmell Student 
Center on Sept. 26, between 
8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., 11:30 
a.m. to i:00 p.m. and 3 to 
4:30 p.m. 

Another discussion 
group will meet on 



Thursday, Sept. 27, in the 
Gemmell Student Center 
from 9:30 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 
2:30 p.m. A specific room is 
yet to be determined. 

The Brand Marketing 
Initiative also includes 
changes to the CUP Web 
site and a new school 
emblem. 

Campus wide input on 
strengths, weaknesses, core 
values and competitive 
advantages is being gath- 
ered between Aug. 31 and 
Sept. 14, 2007 as part of an 
e-mail request to Clarion 
University faculty, staff, 
students and alumni. 

The e-mail was sent out 
by Grunenwald, asking fac- 
ulty, staff, students and 
alumni to voice their opin- 
ion in these areas. As to 
date, only three people have 
signed up for focus groups. 

Any Clarion University 
student interested in sign- 
ing up for a discussion group 
can contact David Love in 
University Relations or e- 
mail dlove@clarion.edu. 

Freshman senators will be 
in attendance at the next 
student senate meeting 



CUP News Briefs 

■ A new online undergraduate program in library sci- 
ence will now be offered at Clarion University, which 
will allow students to complete their undergraduate 
degree with a concentration in library science. 

■ The Clarion University Alumi Association will honor 
six individuals with Distinguished Awards during the 
2007 Autumn Leaf Festival homecoming weekend. 

■ CUP will celebrate Constitution Day Sept 19 to 20 
with several activities coordinated by the American 
Democracy Project team and the offices of Academic 
Affairs and Admissions. 

■ The Developing University Faculty Skills in 
Providing Accomodations to Students with Disabilities 
Seminar will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 26 at 1:30 
p.m. in Level A of Carlson Library. 

■ Professor of Earth Science, Dr. Anthony Vega pub- 
lished the co-authored textbook, "Climatology," on 
November 1. 

■ The Clarion University Foundation, Inc. announced 
the appointment of two new employees, Kenneth C. 
Nellis as Athletic Major Gifts Officer, and Jessica L. 
Park as Foundation Accountant. 

■ CUP's Small Business Development Center was 
recently recognized in the Pennsylvania Small 
Business Development Center Fall/Winter newsletter 
in a story about Roser Technologies, Inc, which was 
aided CUP's Small Business Development Center. 

■ Interim dean of Clarion University's College of 
Business Administration, Dr. Jim Pesek recently co- 
authored an article that was featured in the Journal of 
Managerial Issues in the Fall 2007 issue. 



More schools offer teacher bonuses as House debates issue 



Michael A. Chandler 
Washington Post 

WASHINGTON - A move- 
ment gaining momentum in 
Cohgress and some school 
systems across the nation 
would boost pay for excep- 
tional teachers in high- 
poverty schools, a departure 
from salary schedules based 
on seniority and profession- 
al degrees that have kept 
pay in lockstep for decades. 
Lawmakers are debating 
this month whether to 
authorize federal grants 
through a revision of the No 
Child Left Behind law for 
bonuses of as much as 
$12,500 a year for outstand- 
ing teachers in schools that 
serve lowincome areas. 

National teachers 

unions denounce the pro- 
posal for "performance pay," 
saying it would undermine 
their ability to negotiate 
contracts and would be 
based in part on what they 
consider an unfair and 
unreliable measure: student 
test scores. 

Debate over the propos- 
al has exposed unusual fis- 
sures between the influen- 
tial unions and longtime 
Democratic allies. Some 



education experts say the 
unions are out of step with 
parents and voters who sup- 
port the business-oriented 
idea of providing financial 
incentives for excellent 
work. 

Rep. George Miller, D- 
Calif, chairman of the 
House Education and Labor 
Committee, said that the 
teaching workforce is leak- 
ing talent and that his pro- 
posal would help rejuvenate 
it. Young teachers watch 
their friends "go off and get 
paid for their time and inge- 
nuity" in other fields. Miller 
said. "In teaching, you go as 
fast as the slowest person." 

Miller's proposal, build- 
ing on recent federal steps 
to encourage incentive pay, 
would provide grants to 
school systems that choose 
to pay bonuses to teachers 
who excel in high-poverty 
schools, worth up to $10,000 
in most cases and $12,500 
for specialists in math, sci- 
ence and other hard-to-staff 
subjects. Decisions on who 
gets extra pay would be 
based on student test gains 
and professional evalua- 
tions. Miller's aides said 
they had no cost estimate 
for the measure. 



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Advocates of perform- 
ance pay have seen similar 
initiatives fail, and many 
take pains to avoid the term 
'merit pay' and its associa- 
tion with past mistakes. But 
with fresh support from 
foundations and new tools 
that enable student achieve- 
ment data to be linked to 
individual teachers, many 
experts said the idea is 
gaining favor. Performance 
pay efforts are underway in 
school systems in Denver 
and Minnesota, and some 
local administrators are 
planning to estabUsh fast 
tracks for financial rewards 
for top teachers. 

In the District of 
Columbia, a five-year, $14 
million federal grant is fuel- 
ing a pilot program to 
reward teachers and princi- 
pals in a dozen high-poverty 
public schools each year 
that achieve the strongest 
gains in test scores and 
share successful strategies 
with others. Details are 
being worked out by the city 
school system, the local 
teachers union and a part- 
ner organization, New 
Leaders for New Schools. 

The approach is also 
being tried in a dozen char- 
ter schools with help from a 
private grant. Charter 
schools are pubhcly funded 
but independently operated. 

The D.C. Preparatory 
Academy charter school 
adopted another perform- 
ance pay plan designed by 



the national foundation- 
funded Teacher 
Advancement Program. Its 
model pairs teacher evalua- 
tions with professional 
development and training. 

One day last week, 
math teacher and mentor 
MaryKate Hughes observed 
how another math teacher 
set goals and expectations 
for his students. In another 
classroom, Hughes made 
notes on a science teacher's 
pacing and preparation. 

Newer teachers can 
receive bonuses of as much 
as $2,000 based on test 
score improvements and 
evaluations by master 
teachers and principals. 
"Our goal is to find good 
teachers who can become 
great teachers," Hughes 
said. 

In Arlington County, 
Va., the school system is 
startmg an initiative that 
offers teachers three oppor- 
tunities to skip a step on the 
pay scale, an increase worth 
as much as 5 percent in 
salary each time. 

This school year, teach- 
ers can quaUfy for the pay 
increase through national 
board certification. In com- 
ing years, they will be able 
to apply by submitting a 
portfolio of work demon- 
stri'ting professional devel- 
opment in such areas as 
leadership and parent out- 
reach. 

Arlington officials stressed 
that evaluations would not 



hinge on test scores, 
although teachers could 
submit them as evidence of 
success. Officials with the 
school system and the coun- 
ty teachers association, who 
designed the program 
together, said relying on test 
scores would fail to capture 
the complexity of teaching 
and discourage teachers 
from working with challeng- 
ing students. 

"If I'm only going to be 
evaluated on the test scores 
of my kids, I'll take the gift- 
ed kids," said Lee Dorman, 
president of the Arlington 
Education Association. 

There is controversy 
over using standardized 
tests to rate schools. Tying 
test results to teacher pay 
would raise the stakes. But 
performance-pay advocates 
say it's only fair to evaluate 
teachers the same way 
schools and children are 
measured. 

The idea of merit pay 
gained popularity in the 
1980s. But some attempts 
then to implement the con- 
cept failed amid teacher 
complaints that evaluations 
were too subjective. Critics 
said principals were given 
leeway to give bonuses to 
favorite employees. Fairfax 
County, Va., began a pro- 
gram in 1986 that paid 
teachers as much as $4,000 
in annual bonuses. But by 
the early 1990s, the pro- 
gram fell out of favor with 
many teachers. It was aban- 



doned in 1992 as the Fairfax 
School Board grappled with 
budget cuts. 

The new performance 
pay movement is rife with 
experiments that have 
yielded few definitive 
national studies showing 
gains in student achieve- 
ment. Union leaders are 
urging lawmakers to hold 
off on Miller's proposal. 
National Education 

Association President Reg 
Weaver called the proposal 
an "unprecedented attack" 
on collective bargaining 
rights. 

Antonia Cortese, execu- 
tive vice president of the 
American Federation of 
Teachers, rejected the argu- 
ment that performance pay 
would lure teachers into 
hard-to-staff schools. "I 
would think it would be a 
disincentive to take on 
something when you don't 
know how it will work," she 
said. 

Still, schools in many 
places are plunging ahead. 
Systems across Minnesota 
have adopted performance 
pay measures, prompted by 
an $86 million initiative. 
After a long study, the 
Denver public school system 
began a district-wide incen- 
tive pay program in recent 
years. 

As debate over performance 
pay unfolds. Miller said he 
is sure about one thing: 
"The demand is there." 



Rather files lawsuit against CBS 



Matea Gold 

Los /Ange/os Times 

NEW YORK - Longtime 
CBS anchor Dan Rather 
filed a $70 million lawsuit 
Wednesday against his for- 
mer employer, alleging that 
executives at the broadcast 
network broke the terms of 
his contract by marginaliz- 
ing him in his final days at 
CBS News and forcing him 
to retire early. 

The lawsuit, filed in 
New York State Supreme 
Court Wednesday after- 
noon, comes as a startling 



postscript to the saga that 
dominated the news division 
three years ago, when a 
political furor erupted over 
a piece Rather anchored 
about President Bush's 
service in the Texas Air 
National Guard, later found 
to be based on unsubstanti- 
ated documents. 

In the wake of the con- 
troversy, a producer was 
fired and three executives 
were forced to resign. Six 
months later. Rather 
stepped down from the 
anchor chair of "CBS 
Evening News," a year shy 



of his 25th anniversary in 
the job. His lawsuit, first 
reported on The New York 
Times Web site , claims that 
CBS and its former parent 
company, Viacom, violated 
the terms of his contract 
and sought to tarnish his 
reputation and restrict his 
abilities to seek work in 
order to contain the political 
fallout from the story. The 
complaint names CBS Chief 
Executive Leshe Moonves, 
Viacom Chairman Sumner 
Redstone and former CBS 
News President Andrew 
Heyward as defendants. 



According to the complaint, 
"Central to defendants' plan 
to pacify the White House 
was to offer Mr. Rather as 
the public face of the story, 
and as a scapegoat for CBS 
management's bungling of 
the entire episode - which, 
as a direct result, became 
known publicly as 
'Rathergate."' 

CBS dismissed Rather's 
claims. 

'These complaints are 
old news and this lawsuit is 
without merit," the network 
said in a statement. 



Page 3 



im CLARION CALL 



September 20, 2007 






Ifiiiti 



You've got a rebel in Gravel 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

szhause@clarion.edu 




"I am prepared to tell 
you that Americans are 
getting fatter and dumber. 
1 have no problem saying 
that." These were Mike 
Gravel's friendly words to 
Bill Maher this past week 
on the most recent online 
Democratic Presidential 
forum. It truly warms my 
heart to see such blatant 
honesty from a politiciar. In 
a country that has become 
increasingly apathetic 

towards politics as a result 
of having the same carbon 
copy candidates every elec- 
tion, we finally get a saving 
grace in Mike Gravel. 
Gravel, a former U.S. 
Senator from Alaska, was 
probably best known (before 
his presidential bid) for his 
leading role in bringing the 
"Pentagon Papers" to the 
attention of his fellow sena- 
tors. The Pentagon Papers 
contained information 

which exposed the lies and 
exaggerations that the 
Johnson Administration 
had been telling to the 
American people about their 
government's unnecessary 
expansion of the Vietnam 
War. He was also responsi- 
ble for a five month long fil- 
ibuster in 1971 which ulti- 
mately ended the draft dur- 
ing the Vietnam War. These 
Gravel facts were unknown 
to me, at least until I saw 
them on his website. 

Gravel, after losing his 
senatorial election in 1980 
took a break from politics, 
and when I say break, I 
mean almost three decades 
since he last held office. I do 
not know exactly what he 
was doing during those 
three decades, but I would 
be willing to bet that he 
was watching plenty of con- 
spiracy movies and subject- 
ing himself to a little too 
much alone time in the land 
where the sun doesn't set. 
Regardless of how he was 
occupying his time, he sure 
has come back into the 
world of politics with that 
crazy look in his eye. 
Luckily for us that crazy 
look in his eye can be seen in 
his campaign ads, speeches 
and interviews that are 
always chalked full of out- 
landish statements and 
unfiltered honesty. 



Of course I cannot be 
sure of his sanity level, but 
judging from his carefully 
crafted campaign ads fea- 
turing slogans like "Vote 
Gravel. What The Hell?" 1 
can be sure that he is my 
favorite candidate for presi- 
dent. This does not mean 
that I will vote for him, but, 
I would not rule it out just 
yet. 

While he has the ability 
to make politics interesting 
to a cynical political junkie 
like myself, the important 
question arises; does he 
have the ability to win the 
nomination of the 
Democratic Party? Well, 
unfortunately he probably 
does not, but hey, at least 
it's a step in the right direc- 
tion. 

Since we're all just 
along for the ride on this 
roller coaster known as life, 
and fortunate enough to 
have the ability to vote for 
our elected officials, why not 
make it more interesting? 
Sure Gravel may not be the 
most stable person in the 
race, hell, he might not even 
be stable enough to make a 
cup of coffee in the morning, 
but he is certainly the most 
interesting person in the 
race. 

I have been watching a 
fair number of campaign 
ads and interviews from 
every candidate on both 
sides of the ticket, from this 
election and years past, and 
his are by far the most 
whacked of any real presi- 
dential candidate of our 
time. Anyone reading- this 
article should visit his web- 
site www.gravel2008.com 
and watch some of his cam- 
paign videos. If you like 
awkward staring, rock 
throwing, or campfires, then 
you're in luck, because he's 
got them all right there. But 
we do not have to look too 
far to find outright craziness 
and absurdities in cam- 
paigns. 

The current Bush 
Administration has not real- 
ly done anything that it had 
promised during their cam- 
paign, well, at least on the 
diplomatic level. We all 
know that taxes have been 
lowered, and thank God for 
that, because we all know 
how pesky taxes can be dur- 
ing a time of war. But back 
to the diplomatic point, does 
anyone remember George 
W Bush's first presidential 
campaign? More specifically, 
does anyone remember how 
"Dubya" was able to per- 
suade the moderate voters 
to vote for him before he 
miraculously lost and won 
in 2000? Probably not, so I 
will refresh your memories. 
"W", under the advice of MC 
Rove, ran as being the 
unconventional "compas- 



sionate conservative." I 
guess allowing the execu- 
tion of several mentally 
retarded people while being 
governor of Texas qualified 
him as a compassionate per- 
son. But why bring this up? 
Well, "W" ran on false prom- 
ises, claiming pretty fre- 
quently along the campaign 
trail that he would be a 
"uniter, not a divider." Well, 
after being a 23 year veter- 
an of saying the Pledge of 
Allegiance, I believe that 
unite means "to bring 
together, as one," and as a 
veteran of second and third 
grade math, I believe that 
divide means to "split up 
parts of a whole." If these 
definitions are true, which 1 
opine (without being too 
technical) that they are, 
then all that I can assume is 
that every time the future 
Decider was saying this lit- 
tle self descriptive phrase, 
that he was actually bluff 
ing his hand. He was betting 
on war, but playing tht 
peace card. That'll learn the 
"terrists" not to mess with 
his daddy. 

Our country and world 
are much more divided since 
Bush took office, and we 
have him and other failed 
diplomatic policies to thank. 
But the purpose of this arti- 
cle is not to belittle George 
Bush, as it has become bor- 
ing and very common among 
just about everyone... 
besides Ann Coulter's liber- 
al slaying minions. They 
remain neutral with Bush 
by saying that np matter 
what Bush has done or will ' 
do, he would still be a lot 
better than that fake war 
hero elitist John Kerry. But 
the point of these para- 
graphs is not to rag on "W," 
or John Kerry, but rather it 
is to demonstrate that any- 
one can promise anything, 
but can act in another way. 

However with Mike 
Gravel, you get what you 
see. He will not lie under 
oath about sexual relations, 
or promise to be diplomatic 
and then begin calling 
French Fries Freedom 
Fries. Mike Gravel will have 
"Kum Ba Ya" campfires on 
the front lawn of the White 
House and do keg stands 
with the college kids. Well, 
maybe not, but, he would at 
least continue to break 
down the walls of political 
stereotypes that have been 
assigned to the rest of the 
rank and file candidates 
that dominate the headlines 
of most media outlets. 

At 77 years of age. 
Gravel stands to gain noth- 
ing from his presidential 
run other than jet lag, 
ridicule and slander, but he 
just does not care. He is say- 
ing what is on his mind 
without any reservations or 



fear of confrontation. At one 
of the earlier presidential 
debates, Gravel looked 
around, studied the candi- 
dates on stage and said with 
great conviction that "These 
candidates .scare me." Quite 
frankly, after thinking about 
it, the other candidates, 
Democrats and 

Republicans, scare me too. 

Most "top tier" candi- 
dates are campaigning with 
the same little quips and 
phrases that we have heard 
at some point from every 
other presidential candidate 
for the last fifty years. 
Every single one of them 
walks around with a plastic 
smile on their pretty little 
face and pretends to enjoy 
being at the Iowa State Fair. 
Gravel probably doesn't 
even go to state fairs, but if 
he did, I'd be willing to bet 
that he would be the first 
one to ask how someone 
actually came up with the 
idea of a deep fried Oreo. 
That doughy concept still 
blows my mind, but then 1 
ask myself, what will they 
come up with next, a solu- 
tion for world hunger? Well. 
I wouldn't hold out for that, 
but I would invest in the 
idea of an edible cell phone. 
It might not save lives or 
solve problems, but it will be 
another way of keeping 
Americans distracted long 
enough for the Bushites to 
come up with another rea- 
son as to why we invaded 
Iraq. Okay, no more Bush 
references, I promise, just 
straight Gravel from here 

on out* " .w- .:■.,■, 

Mike Gravel has no real 
chance of winning, barring 
some bizarre dose of fair 
media coverage, but at least 
he is keeping the campaign 
interesting. All of last week 
I was hoping and praying 
that Mike Gravel would do 
something newsworthy, and 
sure enough, my hopes and 
prayers were realized when 
he said that Americans were 
getting fatter and dumber. 
Obesity is on the rise, test 
grades are dropping and 
Mike Gravel is pointing that 
out. This blunt shot of truth 
is good for us. We have 
allowed our country to 
devolve from the proud 
World War II generation to a 
group of obese, iPod wield- 
ing, reality show watching, 
Hummer driving wastes of 
space. If this is the best that 
conventional politicians 
have to offer, 1 say let's go 
Gravel, at least we don't 
have to elect him to find out 
that he is insane. 

Disclaimer: I own an 
iPod and could stand to lose 
about twenty pounds, so I 
am with most of vou. 




Editor: 

The Young Republican 
organization is to be com- 
mended for its display of 
flags to honor those who 
died as a result of the 
events of September 11, 
2001. But among the 2977 
individuals who lost their 
lives were nearly 500 for- 
eign nationals. Perhaps if 
the Young Republican 
group repeats the display 



next year they they could 
include the flags of the 91 
countries who lost people 
during that terrible event. 
I would be willing to sup- 
port that effort. 
-Iseli Krauss 
Alumni Distinguished 
■Professor Emerita 
Clarion University 

To whom it may concern, 

It seems that every year 
the rite of passage for some 
students (not all) is to 
destroy mail boxes. This is 
not a laughing matter, con- 
sidering the damage that 
takes place. Just drive 



down Fifth Avenue toward 
I- 80 on any given Sunday 
morning or Friday morning 
(party nights I assume) 
and see the spectacle. One 
might ask if I am sure the 
vandals are college stu- 
dents. No I'm not positive, 
but considering the dam- 
age usually starts at the 
onset of college, stops at 
the close of college, and 
those involved are usually 
in a drunken state walking 
up and down South Fifth 
Avenue from frat party to 
frat party, I'm pretty sure 
they are university stu- 
dents. 
Elderly people have to 



repair and replace their 
mailboxes on a yearly 
basis. These acts are not 
only wrong, they are ille- 
gal. The university, in my 
opinion, is responsible. I 
can still repair my mailbox, 
but there are many who 
cannot afford it. 
I have nothing against uni- 
versity students having a 
good time, however, they 
need to keep their parties 
and their destructive 
behavior to themselves. 

I know this will probably 
fall on deaf ears, but it had 
to be said 



liililiirliil. Li'llii's k \k Eioriind I'iilJ on liiu 



THE CLARION CALL 



270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 



Phone: 814-393-2380 
Web: clarJoncall.clarion.edu 



Fax: 814-393-2557 
E-mail: call@clarion.edu 



Executive Board 
2007-2008 



Lindsay Grystar, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hlll-Wagner 
Adviser 



Staff 

News: Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Gretchen Bethyorl, 
Jamie Richard, Donald Baum Entertainment Amy Powers, 
Amber Stockholm, Joey Pettine, John Buffone, Travis Lear, 
Rachella Vollant-Barle Sports: Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield, Denise Simons fipfty |#ijli<; 
Jillian Walmer Features : Rob Miller, Gregg Bandzuh 
Advertising : Douglas Gisewhite, Aaron Swaniek 
Photography and Graphics: Jenifer Poblete, Dominic 
DeAngelo, Adam Huff, Sean Montgomery, Stefanie Juia, 
Andy Lander, Daria Kurnal, Jessica Lasher Circulation: f«iate 
Laney, Eric Miller, Justin Hogue, Brian Picard, Craig Beary, 
Jessica Cornman 



Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
tlie right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only t)ased 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricutar 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricuiar. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and 'the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 



■ Opinions expressed in this publication 
are tliose of tt)e writer or speai(er, and do 
not necessarily reflect the opinions of the 
newspaper staff, student body, Clarion 
University or the community. 



Corrections- 



■ On page 5 of the September 13 edition of The 
Clarion Call the story entitled "Olivas-Lujan research- 
es US and Mexico technology" had a few errors that 
deserve correction. It was stated that Dr. Olivas-Lujan 
has lived in Clarion for eight years, when he has lived 
here for two. It was ahso stated that Olivas-Lujan has 
"received doctorates in Human Resources and 
Computer Technology," when he has a bachelor's 
degree in Computer Engineering and a Master's degree 
in Business administration with a concentration in 
International Business. He does have a doctorate in 
Business Administration but it was earned at the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

■ Mao. the story entitled "Signing a music contract 
may lead to signing your death certificate," was incor- 
rectly attributed. Shari Roan of the Los Angeles Times 
is the correct author. 

The Cnll K jjirt.- these errors. 



Page 2 



rasCLAMONCiILL 



September 20. 2007 



kws 



Senate appoints new senator 



Donald Baum 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s dwbaumOclarlon.edu 




CLARION, Sept. 17 - The 
CUP student senate held 
their third meeting of the 
fall semester Monday, Sept. 
17 in room 146 of the 
Gemmell Student Complex. 

Senator Dave Durney 
resigned and the second 
alternative, Lacey 

Klingensmith, was appoint- 
ed. 

Changes made to the 
student senate Constitution 
last semester are awaiting 
approval of Clarion 
University President, 

Joseph P. Grunenwald. 

The meeting started 
with a roll call of the stu- 
dent senators and a review 
of the minutes. 

Student Sub- 



Committees were appointed 
including the Student 
Facilities Committee, 

The Student Facihties 
Committee will be com- 
prised of 15 students who 
will offer advice as to what 
they would like to see 
offered by the University 
book store located in the 
Gemmell Student Complex 
among other buildings. 

Representatives were 
appointed to the committees 
of Election Advertising Sub 
Committee, Housing 

Committee, Committee on 
Rules and Regulations, 
Safety and Environmental 
Concerns Committee among 
others. 

Key discussions includ- 
ed the accounting club and 
the Hip-Hop Symposium. 
Student senate approved 
allocation of $2,660.40 to 
the accounting club to 
attend the annual IMA 
Conference and an addition- 
al $2000 was donated from 
the student senate budget to 
the Hip-Hop Symposium to 
be used for the purpose of 
acquiring guest speakers. 

Further discussions 
included the Clarion 
University's Brand 

Marketing Initiative. 



The University is cur- 
rently looking for 9 to 12 
students to participate in 
two 90- minute focus groups. 

The focus groups are to 
be used as part of Clarion 
University's Brand 

Marketing Initiative. The 
focus groups will also 
include faculty members, 
alumni, administrators and 
staff. 

The purpose of the focus 
groups is to review compiled 
information from student 
feedback into a series of 
brand "value statements." 

By updating the 
University's image, Clarion 
University will enhance its 
ability to compete with 
other higher learning insti- 
tutions, improving the 
quantity and quality of 
applicants to Clarion 
University. 

A total of 18 to 24 stu- 
dents are needed to partici- 
pate in the two discussion 
groups. 

The sessions will be held 
in the Gemmell Student 
Center on Sept. 26, between 
8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m., 11:30 
a.m. to i:00 p.m. and 3 to 
4:30 p.m. 

Another discussion 
group will meet on 



Thursday, Sept. 27, in the 
Gemmell Student Center 
from 9:30 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 
2:30 p.m. A specific room is 
yet to be determined. 

The Brand Marketing 
Initiative also includes 
changes to the CUP Web 
site and a new school 
emblem. 

Campus wide input on 
strengths, weaknesses, core 
values and competitive 
advantages is being gath- 
ered between Aug. 31 and 
Sept. 14, 2007 as part of an 
e-mail request to Clarion 
University faculty, staff, 
students and alumni. 

The e-mail was sent out 
by Grunenwald, asking fac- 
ulty, staff, students and 
alumni to voice their opin- 
ion in these areas. As to 
date, only three people have 
signed up for focus groups. 

Any Clarion University 
student interested in sign- 
ing up for a discussion group 
can contact David Love in 
University Relations or e- 
mail dlove@clarion.edu. 

Freshman senators will be 
in attendance at the next 
student senate meeting 



CUP News Briefs 

■ A new online undergraduate program in library sci- 
ence will now be offered at Clarion University, which 
will allow students to complete their undergraduate 
degree with a concentration in library science. 

■ The Clarion University Alumi Association will honor 
six individuals with Distinguished Awards during the 
2007 Autumn Leaf Festival homecoming weekend. 

■ CUP will celebrate Constitution Day Sept 19 to 20 
with several activities coordinated by the American 
Democracy Project team and the offices of Academic 
Affairs and Admissions. 

■ The Developing University Faculty Skills in 
Providing Accomodations to Students with Disabilities 
Seminar will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 26 at 1:30 
p.m. in Level A of Carlson Library. 

■ Professor of Earth Science, Dr. Anthony Vega pub- 
lished the co-authored textbook, "Climatology," on 
November 1. 

■ The Clarion University Foundation, Inc. announced 
the appointment of two new employees, Kenneth C. 
Nellis as Athletic Major Gifts Officer, and Jessica L. 
Park as Foundation Accountant. 

■ CUP's Small Business Development Center was 
recently recognized in the Pennsylvania Small 
Business Development Center Fall/Winter newsletter 
in a story about Roser Technologies, Inc, which was 
aided CUP's Small Business Development Center. 

■ Interim dean of Clarion University's College of 
Business Administration, Dr. Jim Pesek recently co- 
authored an article that was featured in the Journal of 
Managerial Issues in the Fall 2007 issue. 



More schools offer teacher bonuses as House debates issue 



Michael A. Chandler 
Washington Post 

WASHINGTON - A move- 
merit gaining momentum in 
' Cofigress and some school 
systems across the nation 
would boost pay for excep- 
tional teachers in high- 
poverty schools, a departure 
from salary schedules based 
on seniority and profession- 
al degrees that have kept 
pay in lockstep for decades. 
Lawmakers are debating 
this month whether to 
authorize federal grants 
through a revision of the No 
Child Left Behind law for 
bonuses of as much as 
$12,500 a year for outstand- 
ing teachers in schools that 
serve low-income areas. 

National teachers 

unions denounce the pro- 
posal for "performance pay," 
saying it would undermine 
their ability to negotiate 
contracts and would be 
based in part on what they 
consider an unfair and 
unreliable measure: student 
test scores. 

Debate over the propos- 
al has exposed unusual fis- 
sures between the influen- 
tial unions and longtime 
Democratic allies. Some 



education experts say the 
unions are out of step with 
parents and voters who sup- 
port the business-oriented 
idea of providing financial 
incentives for excellent 
work. 

Rep. George Miller, D- 
Calif, chairman of the 
House Education and Labor 
Committee, said that the 
teaching workforce is leak- 
ing talent and that his pro- 
posal would help rejuvenate 
it. Young teachers watch 
their friends "go off and get 
paid for their time and inge- 
nuity" in other fields, Miller 
said. "In teaching, you go as 
fast as the slowest person." 

Miller's proposal, build- 
ing on recent federal steps 
to encourage incentive pay, 
would provide grants to 
school systems that choose 
to pay bonuses to teachers 
who excel in high-poverty 
schools, worth up to $10,000 
in most cases and $12,500 
for specialists in math, sci- 
ence and other hard-to-staff 
subjects. Decisions on who 
gets extra pay would be 
based on student test gains 
and professional evalua- 
tions. Miller's aides said 
they had no cost estimate 
for the measure. 



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Advocates of perform- 
ance pay have seen similar 
initiatives fail, and many 
take pains to avoid the term 
'merit pay' and its associa- 
tion with past mistakes. But 
with fresh support from 
foundations and new tools 
that enable student achieve- 
ment data to be linked to 
individual teachers, many 
experts said the idea is 
gaining favor Performance 
pay efforts are underway in 
school systems in Denver 
and Minnesota, and some 
local administrators are 
planning to establish fast 
tracks for financial rewards 
for top teachers. 

In the District of 
Columbia, a five-year, $14 
million federal grant is fuel- 
ing a pilot program to 
reward teachers and princi- 
pals in a dozen high-poverty 
public schools each year 
that achieve the strongest 
gains in test scores and 
share successful strategies 
with others. Details are 
being worked out by the city 
school system, the local 
teachers union and a part- 
ner organization, New 
Leaders for New Schools. 

The approach is also 
being tried in a dozen char- 
ter schools with help from a 
private grant. Charter 
schools are publicly funded 
but independently operated. 

The D.C. Preparatory 
Academy charter school 
adopted another perform- 
ance pay plan designed by 



the national foundation- 
funded Teacher 
Advancement Program. Its 
model pairs teacher evalua- 
tions with professional 
development and training. 

One day last week, 
math teacher and mentor 
MaryKate Hughes observed 
how another math teacher 
set goals and expectations 
for his students. In another 
classroom, Hughes made 
notes on a science teacher's 
pacing and preparation. 

Newer teachers can 
receive bonuses of as much 
as $2,000 based on test 
score improvements and 
evaluations by master 
teachers and principals. 
"Our goal is to find good 
teachers who can become 
great teachers," Hughes 
said. 

In Arlington County, 
Va., the school system is 
starting an initiative that 
offers teachers three oppor- 
tunities to skip a step on the 
pay scale, an increase worth 
as much as 5 percent in 
salary each time. 

This school year, teach- 
ers can qualify for the pay 
increase through national 
board certification. In com- 
ing years, they will be able 
to apply by submitting a 
portfolio of work demon- 
strating professional devel- 
opment in such areas as 
leadership and parent out- 
reach. 

Arlington officials stressed 
that evaluations would not 



hinge on test scores, 
although teachers could 
submit them as evidence of 
success. Officials with the 
school system and the coun- 
ty teachers association, who 
designed the program 
together, said relying on test 
scores would fail to capture 
the complexity of teaching 
and discourage teachers 
from working with challeng- 
ing students. 

"If I'm only going to be 
evaluated on the test scores 
of my kids, I'll take the gift- 
ed kids," said Lee Dorman, 
president of the Arlington 
Education Association. 

There is controversy 
over using standardized 
tests to rate schools. Tying 
test results to teacher pay 
would raise the stakes. But 
performance-pay advocates 
say it's only fair to evaluate 
teachers the same way 
schools and children are 
measured. 

The idea of merit pay 
gained popularity in the 
1980s. But some attempts 
then to implement the con- 
cept failed amid teacher 
complaints that evaluations 
were too subjective. Critics 
said principals were given 
leeway to give bonuses to 
favorite employees. Fairfax 
County, Va., began a pro- 
gram in 1986 that paid 
teachers as much as $4,000 
in annual bonuses. But by 
the early 1990s, the pro- 
gram fell out of favor with 
many teachers. It was aban- 



doned in 1992 as the Fairfax 
School Board grappled with 
budget cuts. 

The new performance 
pay movement is rife with 
experiments that have 
yielded few definitive 
national studies showing 
gains in student achieve- 
ment. Union leaders are 
urging lawmakers to hold 
off on Miller's proposal. 
National Education 

Association President Reg 
Weaver called the proposal 
an "unprecedented attack" 
on collective bargaining 
rights. 

Antonia Cortese, execu- 
tive vice president of the 
American Federation of 
Teachers, rejected the argu- 
ment that performance pay 
would lure teachers into 
hard-to'staff schools. "I 
would think it would be a 
disincentive to take on 
something when you don't 
know how it will work," she 
said. 

Still, schools in many 
places are plunging ahead. 
Systems across Minnesota 
have adopted performance 
pay measures, prompted by 
an $86 million initiative. 
After a long study, the 
Denver public school system 
began a district-wide incen- 
tive pay program in recent 
years. 

As debate over performance 
pay unfolds. Miller said he 
is sure about one thing: 
"The demand is there." 



Rather files lawsuit against CBS 



Matea Gold 

Los Angelas Times 

NEW YORK - Longtime 
CBS anchor Dan Rather 
filed a $70 million lawsuit 
Wednesday against his for- 
mer employer, alleging that 
executives at the broadcast 
network broke the terms of 
his contract by marginaliz- 
ing him in his final days at 
CBS News and forcing him 
to retire early. 

The lawsuit, filed in 
New York State Supreme 
Court Wednesday after- 
noon, comes as a startling 



postscript to the saga that 
dominated the news division 
three years ago, when a 
political furor erupted over 
a piece Rather anchored 
about President Bush's 
service in the Texas Air 
National Guard, later found 
to be based on unsubstanti- 
ated documents. 

In the wake of the con- 
troversy, a producer was 
fired and three executives 
were forced to resign. Six 
months later. Rather 
stepped down from the 
anchor chair of "CBS 
Evening News," a year shy 



of his 25th anniversary in 
the job. His lawsuit, first 
reported on The New York 
Times Web site , claims that 
CBS and its former parent 
company, Viacom, violated 
the terms of his contract 
and sought to tarnish his 
reputation and restrict his 
abilities to seek work in 
order to contain the pohtical 
fallout from the story. The 
complaint names CBS Chief 
Executive Leslie Moonves, 
Viacom Chairman Sumner 
Redstone and former CBS 
News President Andrew 
Heyward as defendants. 



According to the complaint, 
"Central to defendants' plan 
to pacify the White House 
was to offer Mr Rather as 
the public face of the story, 
and as a scapegoat for CBS 
management's bungling of 
the entire episode " which, 
as a direct result, became 
known publicly as 
'Rathergate."' 

CBS dismissed Bather's 
claims. 

"These complaints are 
old news and this lawsuit is 
without merit," the network 
said in a statement. 



Page 3 



Tiffi CUkSION C ALL 



September 20, 2007 






Mm 



You've got a rebel in Gravel 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

szhause@clarlon.edu 




"I am prepared to tell 
you that Americans are 
getting fatter and dumber 
I have no problem saying 
that." These were Mike 
Gravel's friendly words to 
Bill Maher this past week 
on the most recent online 
Democratic Presidential 
forum. It truly warms my 
heart to see such blatant 
honesty from a politician. In 
a country that has become 
increasingly apathetic 
towards politics as a result 
of having the same carbon 
copy candidates every elec- 
tion, we finally get a saving 
grace in Mike Gravel. 
Gravel, a former U.S. 
Senator from Alaska, was 
probably best known (before 
his presidential bid) for his 
leading role in bringing the 
"Pentagon Papers" to the 
attention of his fellow sena- 
tors. The Pentagon Papers 
contained information 

which exposed the lies and 
exaggerations that the 
Johnson Administration 
had been telling to the 
American people about their 
government's unnecessary 
expansion of the Vietnam 
War. He was also responsi- 
ble for a five month long fil- 
ibuster in 1971 which ulti- 
mately ended the draft dur- 
ing the Vietnam War These 
Gravel facts were unknown 
to me, at least until I saw 
them on his website. 

Gravel, after losing his 
senatorial election in 1980 
took a break from politics, 
and when I say break, I 
mean almost three decades 
since he last held office. I do 
not know exactly what he 
was doing during those 
three decades, but I would 
be willing to bet that he 
was watching plenty of con- 
spiracy movies and subject- 
ing himself to a little too 
much alone time in the land 
where the sun doesn't set. 
Regardless of how he was 
occupying his time, he sure 
has come back into the 
world of politics with that 
crazy look in his eye. 
Luckily for us that crazy 
look in his eye can be seen in 
his campaign ads, speeches 
and interviews that are 
always chalked full of out- 
landish statements and 
unfiltered honesty. 



Of course I cannot be 
sure of his sanity level, but 
judging from his carefully 
crafted campaign ads fea- 
turing slogans like "Vote 
Gravel. What The Hell?" I 
can be sure that he is my 
favorite candidate for presi- 
dent. This does not mean 
that 1 will vote for him, but, 
I would not rule it out just 
yet. 

While he has the ability 
to make politics interesting 
to a cynical political junkie 
like myself, the important 
question arises! does he 
have the ability to win the 
nomination of the 
Democratic Party? Well, 
unfortunately he probably 
does not, but hey, at least 
it's a step in the right direc- 
tion. 

Since we're all just 
along for the ride on this 
roller coaster known as life, 
and fortunate enough to 
have the ability to vote for 
our elected officials, why not 
make it more interesting? 
Sure Gravel may not be the 
most stable person in the 
race, hell, he might not eve:" 
be stable enough to make a 
cup of coffee in the morning, 
but he is certainly the most 
interesting person in the 
race. 

I have been watching a 
fair number of campaign 
ads and interviews from 
every candidate on both 
sides of the ticket, from this 
election and years past, and 
his are by far the most 
whacked of any real presi- 
dential candidate of our 
time. Anyone reading- this 
article should visit his web- 
site www.gravel2008.com 
and watch some of his cam- 
paign videos. If you like 
awkward staring, rock 
throwing, or campfires, then 
you're in luck, because he's 
got them all right there. But 
we do not have to look too 
far to find outright craziness 
and absurdities in cam- 
paigns. 

The current Bush 
Administration has not real- 
ly done anything that it had 
promised during their cam- 
paign, well, at least on the 
diplomatic level. We all 
know that taxes have been 
lowered, and thank God for 
that, because we all know 
how pesky taxes can be dur- 
ing a time of war But back 
to the diplomatic point, does 
anyone remember George 
W Bush's first presidential 
campaign? More specifically, 
does anyone remember how 
"Dubya" was able to per- 
suade the moderate voters 
to vote for him before he 
miraculously lost and won 
in 2000? Probably not, so I 
will refresh your memories. 
"W", under the advice of MC 
Rove, ran as being the 
unconventional "compas- 



sionate conservative." I 
guess allowing the execu- 
tion of several mentally 
retarded people while being 
governor of Texas qualified 
him as a compassionate per- 
son. But why bring this up? 
Well, "W ran on false prom- 
ises, claiming pretty fre- 
quently along the campaign 
trail that he would be a 
"uniter, not a divider." Well, 
after being a 23 year veter- 
an of saying the Pledge of 
Allegiance, I believe that 
unite means "to bring 
together, as one," and as a 
veteran of second and third 
grade math, I believe that 
divide means to "split up 
parts of a whole." If these 
definitions arc true, which I 
opine (without being too 
technical) that they are, 
then all that I can assume is 
that every time the future 
Decider was saying this lit- 
tle self descriptive phrase, 
that he was actually bluff 
ing his hand. He was betting 
on war, but playing tht 
peace card. That'll learn the 
"terrists" not to mess with 
his daddy. 

Our country and world 
are much more divided since 
Bush took office, and we 
have him and other failed 
diplomatic policies to thank. 
But the purpose of this arti- 
cle is not to belittle George 
Bush, as it has become bor- 
ing and very common among 
just about everyone... 
besides Ann Coulter's liber- 
al slaying minions. They 
remain neutral with Bush 
by saying that nq matter 
' what Bueih has done or will ' 
do, he would still be a lot 
better than that fake war 
hero elitist John Kerry. But 
the point of these para- 
graphs is not to rag on "W," 
or John Kerry, but rather it 
is to demonstrate that any- 
one can promise anything, 
but can act in another way. 

However with Mike 
Gravel, you get what you 
see. He will not lie under 
oath about sexual relations, 
or promise to be diplomatic 
and then begin calling 
French Fries Freedom 
Fries. Mike Gravel will have 
"Kum Ba Ya" campfires on 
the front lawn of the White 
House and do keg stands 
with the college kids. Well, 
maybe not, but, he would at 
least continue to break 
down the walls of political 
stereotypes that have been 
assigned to the rest of the 
rank and file candidates 
that dominate the headlines 
of most media outlets. 

At 77 years of age. 
Gravel stands to gain noth- 
ing from his presidential 
run other than jet lag, 
ridicule and slander, but he 
just does not care. He is say- 
ing what is on his mind 
without any reservations or 



fear of confrontation. At one 
of the earlier presidential 
debates, (iravel looked 
around, studied the candi- 
dates on stage and said with 
great conviction that "These 
candidates scare me." Quite 
frankly, after thinking about 
it, the other candidates. 
Democrats and 

Republicans, scare me too. 

Most "top tier" candi- 
dates are campaigning with 
the same little quips and 
phrases that we have heard 
at some point from every 
other presidential candidate 
for the last fifty years. 
Every single one of them 
walks around with a plastic 
smile on their pretty little 
face and pretends to enjoy 
being at the Iowa State Fair. 
Gravel probably doesn't 
even go to state fairs, but if 
he did, I'd be willing to bet 
that he would be the first 
one to ask how someone 
actually came up with the 
idea of a deep fried Oreo. 
That doughy concept still 
blows my mind, but then 1 
ask myself what will they 
come up with next, a solu- 
tion for world hunger? Well, 
I wouldn't hold out for that, 
but I would invest in the 
idea of an edible cell phone. 
It might not save lives or 
solve problems, but it will be 
another way of keeping 
Americans distracted long 
enough for the Bushites to 
come up with another rea- 
son as to why we invaded 
Iraq. Okay, no more Bush 
references, I promise, just 
straight Gravel from here 
onoutj > 1 • 

Mike Gravel has no real 
chance of winning, barring 
some bizarre dose of fair 
media coverage, but at least 
he is keeping the campaign 
interesting. All of last week 
I was hoping and praying 
that Mike Gravel would do 
something newsworthy, and 
sure enough, my hopes and 
prayers were realized when 
he said that Americans were 
getting fatter and dumber. 
Obesity is on the rise, test 
grades are dropping and 
Mike Gravel is pointing that 
out. This blunt shot of truth 
is good for us. We have 
allowed our country to 
devolve from the proud 
World War II generation to a 
group of obese, iPod wield- 
ing, reality show watching. 
Hummer driving wastes of 
space. If this is the best that 
conventional politicians 
have to offer, I say let's go 
Gravel, at least we don't 
have to elect him to find out 
that he is insane. 

Disclaimer: 1 own an 
iPod and could stand to lose 
about twenty pounds, so I 
am with most of you. 




Editor: 

The Young Republican 
organization is to be com- 
mended for its display of 
flags to honor those who 
died as a result of the 
events of September 11, 
2001. But among the 2977 
individuals who lost their 
lives were nearly 500 for- 
eign nationals. Perhaps if 
the Young Republican 
group repeats the display 



next year they they could 
include the flags of the 91 
countries who lost people 
during that terrible event. 
I would be willing to sup- 
port that effort. 
■Iseli Krauss 
Alumni Distinguished 
■Professor Emerita 
Clarion University 

To whom it may concern, 

It seems that every year 
the rite of passage for some 
students (not all) is to 
destroy mail boxes. This is 
not a laughing matter, con- 
sidering the damage that 
takes place. Just drive 



down Fifth Avenue toward 
I- 80 on any given Sunday 
morning or Friday morning 
(party nights I assume) 
and see the spectacle. One 
might ask if I am sure the 
vandals are college stu- 
dents. No I'm not positive, 
but considering the dam- 
age usually starts at the 
onset of college, stops at 
the close of college, and 
those involved are usually 
in a drunken state walking 
up and down South Fifth 
Avenue from frat party to 
frat party. I'm pretty sure 
they are university stu- 
dents. 
Elderly people have to 



repair and replace their 
mailboxes on a yearly 
basis. These acts are not 
only wrong, they are ille- 
gal. The university, in my 
opinion, is responsible. I 
can still repair my mailbox, 
but there are many who 
cannot afford it. 
I have nothing against uni- 
versity students having a 
good time, however, they 
need to keep their parties 
and their destructive 
behavior to themselves. 

I know this will probably 
fall on deaf ears, but it had 
to be said 



lliorjiil. li'llm III llii> lliiriinil Call on Yoe 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 



Phone:814-393-2380 
Web: clarioncall.clarion.edu 



Fax:814-393-2557 
E-mail: calKiclaHon.edu 



Executive Board 
2007-2008 



Lindsay Grystar, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 



Stephanie Desmond, Shasta Kurtz, 

Features Editor Photos & Graphics Editor 



Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary H Ill-Wagner 
Adviser 



Staff 
News: Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Gretchen Bethyorl, 
Jamie Richard, Donald Baum Entertainment: Amy Powers, 
Amber Stockholm, Joey Pettine, John Buffone, Travis Lear, 
Rachella Vollant-Barle Sports; Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield, Denise Simons Copy EdBtil^p 
Jillian Walmer Features: Rob Miller, Gregg Bandzuh 
Advertising : Douglas Gisewhite, Aaron Swaniek 
Photography and Graphics: Jenifer Poblete, Dominic 
DeAngelo, Adam Huff, Sean Montgomery, Stefanie iuia, 
Andy Lander, Daria Kurnal, Jessica Lasher Circulqticm ; Nate 
Laney, Eric Miller, Justin Hogue, Brian Picard, Craig Beary, 
Jessica Cornman 



Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and otjscen- 
ity: the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-in- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-currlcular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricutar 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 



■ Opinions expressed in this pubiicatlon 
are tiiose of tiie writer or speal(er, and do 
not necessariiy reflect ttie opinions oftlie 
newspaper staff, student body, Clarion 
University or the community. 



Corrections- 



■ On page 5 of the September 13 edition of The 
Clarion Call the story entitled "Olivas-Lujan research- 
es US and Mexico technology" had a few errors that 
deserve correction. It was stated that Dr. Olivas-Lujan 
has lived in Clarion for eight years, when he has lived 
here for two. It was also stated that Olivas-Lujan has 
"received doctorates in Human Resources and 
Computer Technology," when he has a bachelor's 
degree in Computer Engineering and a Master's degree 
in Business administration with a concentration in 
International Business. He does have a doctorate in 
Business Administration but it was earned at the 
University of Pittsburgh. 

■ Also, the story entitled "Signing a music contract 
may lead to signing your death certificate," was incor- 
rectly attributed. Shari Roan of the Los Angeles Times 

is the correct author. 

The Call regrets these errors. 



Page 4 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 20. 2007 



ftitires 



Career Services host a week of job-search skills 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.eclu 

This week, the Career 
Services Center is holding 
"Job Search Skills Week." 

The program used to be 
held as an all-day event, the 
"Professional Development 
Seminar." The individual 
workshops are now present- 
ed throughout the week, to 
accomodate students' busy 
schedules. 

A total of five different 
workshops will be held. 
They all focus on some 
aspect of preparing students 
to find a job. 

"Students who attend 
these workshops will gain 
knowledge about the job 



search process," said Krin 
Lewis, the assistant director 
of the Career Services 
Center. "Each workshop is 
tailored to provide specific 
information on the topic pre- 
sented." 

Starting the week was 
"Application Letters." pre- 
sented by Dr. Rich Lane, an 
English professor at 
Clarion. It was held Monday 
in the Carlson Library. 

Through his speech, he 
taught the audience about 
constructing a cover letter. 
He explained what should 
be contained in each para- 
graph, how to present one- 
self in the best way and the 
"do's and do not's" of writing 
a cover letter. 

"People are actually 
reading your letter," Lane 



told the audience to empha- 
size the importance of a 
well-written letter. 

A key mindset to have 
when searching for a job, he 
said, is to "interview Ithe 
employers! as much as they 
interview you." 

Resume writing work- 
shops were held on Tuesday 
and Wednesday. 

Presented by Lewis, this 
workshop provided a hands- 
on experience. Students 
were able to sit at a comput- 
er and create a rough draft 
of their resume with Lewis' 
tips and assistance. 

An additional resume 
workshop will be held today. 
Other workshops this week 
include "Dress for Success." 
"How to Work a Job Fair" 
and "Preparing for an 



Interview." 

These workshops are 
being held as preparation 
for the upcoming Campus 
Recruiting Day and Career 
Fair on Oct. 9. 

"Before attending any 
kind of job fair, it is impor- 
tant to do some advance 
preparation. These work- 
shops help to provide the 
kind of preparation needed," 
Lewis said. 

The fair will provide an 
informal environment for 
students to meet with 
potential employers. 

Students can participate in 
formal interviews through 
the recruitment program 
after registering with the 
Career Services Center. 



Terman opens Faculty Author 
Seminar Series with his poetry 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s nawatts@clarion.edu 



Faculty members gath- 
ered Sept. 14 for the first 
presentation of the Faculty 
Author Seminar Series. Dr. 
PhiUp Terman, an English 
professor and poet, dis- 
cussed his newly published 
book, "Rabbis in the Air." 

The seminar was creat- 
ed for the Clarion faculty to 
share their scholarly activi- 



ties and receive support and 
recognition for their work. 

Dr. Patricia Kolencik, 
an education professor and 
a member of faculty affairs 
committee, hosted the 
event. 

Terman's poetry con- 
tains a connection with 
nature and his Jewish her- 
itage. One of his poems, 
"When a Child Climbs the 
Apple Tree Gedeuhalluy." is 
about a child observing 
nature. 

"It's [a] sacred and spiri- 
tual [poem about] everyday 



things in nature." Terman 
said. 

Terman writes about his 
inspirations from family 
and childhood memories 
within his poetry. He also 
does research after he 
writes a poem to get better 
understanding and feeling 
for his poetry. 

For him, publishing a 
book was a way to get his 
poetry out to his readers 
and feel a sense of accom- 
plishment in his life. 

"It chose me'' I love the 
intensity of poetry," he said. 



Terman believes the 
seminars are a great way to 
find out what the faculty is 
doing and he will attend 
future presentations. 

The Faculty Author 
Seminar Series has five 
more presentations this fall 
in the Carlson Library. 

The seminar is funded 
through the Clarion 
University-Wide Faculty 
Development Committee's 
Presidential Advancement 
Award from 2007-2010. 



students receive aquatic companions 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 

Students waited in lines 
Tuesday night that 
stretched the length of the 
upstairs hallway in 
Gemmell. The Multi- 
purpose Room was filled 
with students eating pizza, 
receiving an aquatic com- 
panion and learning more 
about the University 
Activities Board (UAB). 

"Make Your Own 
Fishbowl" allowed students 
to take a small plastic con- 
tainer, fill it with rocks in an 
array of colors, add a plastic 
plant and introduce goldfish 
to their new home. 
Everything was free and 
students were given food for 
the fish and themselves. 

"I like fish and I needed 
something pink for my 
room," said Felicia Carter, a 
freshman molecular biology 
major. 

Organized and ran by 
UAB Public Relations Co- 
Chairs Hayley Schafer and 
Brittnee Koebler, the event 
drew its usual large crowd. 

"The event has been 



taking place since I was a 
freshman, so I think it's 
been about three years 
now," said Schafer. a senior 
mass media arts, journalism 
and communication studies 
major. 

UAB also used the event 
as an open forum for stu- 
dents interested in joining 
the organization. 

The idea was proposed 
as a way to get students 
more involved with activi- 
ties around campus. With 
the event, students could 
learn more about the UAB 
and find committees that 
they are interested in and 
sign up for them. 

"Instead of giving away 
just T-shirts or .something, 
we're giving away fishbowls 
and pet fish for students to 
keep," said Schafer. "It's 
kind of a big giveaway, and 
it really attracts students." 

Tabby Pomeroy, a fresh- 
man early education major, 
said, "I want to get a fish 
because it is the only pet 
allowed in the dorms." 

The UAB had over 600 
fish prepared to give away 
There were concerns that 
there would not be enough 
fish to hand out at the 



event, according to volun- 
teers who ran the event. A 
turnout of 300 was expect- 
ed, considering the huge 
turnouts in years past. 

The line began to grow 
outside of the MPR a half 
hour before the activities 
began. Many students came 
to check out the UAB, either 
as current members or as a 
students interested in sign- 
ing-up. Other students just 
came out for the chance to 



socialize with other stu- 
dents and get a free pet for 
their house or room. 

Schafer said that they 
plan to do the event every 
year. 

"Everyone gets very 
involved and has a lot of 
fun," she said. "I'm not sure 
how it would work-out doing 
it every semester, but we 
would definitely like to. It 
draws a lot of people and 
attention." 





Dr. Richard iane teaches students how to write effective cover 
letters on Monday in Carlson Library as part of Career Serwces' 
"Job Search Skills Week." (The Clarion Call/Stefanie Jula) 



ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 





students choose their fish as Erica Hillebrand scoops it from the 
tank. (The Clarion Call/Daria Kurnal) 



Dear Dr. Eagle, 

I'm considering getting a tattoo, but am really afraid 
of needles. How bad is the pain from this procedure? 



Signed, 

Needle Phobia 

Dear Belonephobia (fear of needles), 



Getting a tattoo has been described as feeling l«e 
you're being stung by a hornet multiple times, scratch- 
ing bad sunburn, or getting a bunch of shots. Everyone's 
threshold of pain is different, but it can also depend on 
where on your body you're getting the tattoo and how 
good your tattooist is. 

While pain may be a concern, there are many other 
things to be aware of in making your decision. The pro- 
cedure is done by piercing the skin repeatedly with a 
needle that inserts dye. The needle is connected to a 
small machine that uses an action similar to a sewing 
machine. 

Since the skin is broken you can be more suscepti- 
ble to various health risks. Allergic reactions to the dye 
may occur even years after one gets a tattoo. These 
dyes may include the same pigments used in printers or 
car paint. It may cause areas of excessive scarring or 
form bumps around the ink. Both of these skin reac- 
tions are more likely if your tattoo includes red ink. 

Other risks are many diseases and infections have 
been linked to non-sterile equipment and procedures. 
These transmissions include hepatitis, tuberculosis, 
syphiUs, tetanus and possibly HIV. 

Tattoos are meant to be permanent. Although they 
may be inexpensive, if you should later change your 
mind tattoo removal can be very costly, painful, and 
leave scars. Take your time and do your homework so 
you don't regret your choice/decision later. 

Sanitary and sterile procedures should be a priority 
when selecting a studio/artist. Make sure new needles 
and inks are used and unwrapped in front of you. Your 
tattoo choice should be a design that you love and 
shouldn't be something too trendy. It's even recom- 
mended that you print your design on paper that allows 
you to transfer the image to your skin to try it out for a 
day or two before you get the real thing. Do not get a 
tattoo impulsively, while you're drunk, or under pres- 
sure from friends. 

Dr. Eagle is written by Valerie Wonderling of the Keeling 

Health Center. For more information or to suggest a topic, 

e-mail her at s_vjwonderli@clarion.edu. 



Eagle Ambassadors promote student-alumni relations 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbandzuh@clarion.edu 

Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@ciarion.edu 

"Students today, alumni 
tomorrow," serves as both 
the Eagle Ambassadors' slo- 
gan and purpose as a stu- 
dent organization. 

The group serves as a 
relation between students 
and alumni through events 



with the President of the 
University. They provide 
members and students with 
networking opportunities 
with CUP graduates. 

Currently serving in the 
Eagle Ambassadors organi- 
zation are about 20 mem- 
bers including seven offi- 
cers. They accept applica- 
tions throughout the year 
for membership. 

The organization pro- 
motes alumni activities like 
the alumni tent and alumni 
parking at the Autumn Leaf 
Festival parade, holiday 



parties with the President 
and alumni week at the end 
of the year. 

The group also does 
community service. 

"We always like to give 
back to the less fortunate 
people in the Clarion area," 
said David Reed, President 
of the Eagle Ambassadors 
and a junior mass media 
arts, journalism and com- 
munication studies major. 

The Eagle Ambassadors 
give back through "Donate a 
Meal." With the help of 
Chartwells, students donate 



one meal from their meal 
plan. This money is then 
used to purchase turkeys for 
less fortunate families dur- 
ing the holiday season. 

There are some changes 
that are going to take place 
this year within the organi- 
zation. In the past, the 
Eagle Ambassadors helped 
both the alumni and 
President's offices. They will 
now he creating the 
"President's Circle" as a sep- 
arate group of Ambassadors 
who serve the President. 
Members will participate in 



interviews for this group 
and be selected to serve as 
both an Ambassador and on 
the President's Circle. 

"[I joined] to be more 
involved on campus and so I 
have something to look back 
on," said Danielle DiPerna, 
the group's 

Historian/Marketing Chair 
and a junior 

elementary/early childhood 
education major. 

Meetings for the Eagle 
Ambassadors take place 
twice a month on every- 
other Tuesday. The first 



organizational meeting will 
be held on Sept. 25 at the 
Center for Advancement on 
Greenville Avenue. 

There are seven mem- 
bers on this year's Eagle 
Ambassador Executive 
Board: Reed, President; 
Holly Nolan, Vice President; 
Emily Barney, Secretary; 
Nikki Bovaird, Treasurer; 
DiPerna, Historian/ 

Marketing Chair; and 
Andrew Zachar, 

Recruitment Chair. Theresa 
Martin is their advisor. 



September 20. 2007 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



Eitertiimit 

4 

VMA's Best New Artist scheduled for Fall CampusFest 



Lindsay Grystar 
Editor-in-Chief 

s_llgrystar@clarion.edu 



The VMA's Best New 
Artist winner Gym Class 
Heroes's next stop is Clarion 
University. You have the 
opportunity to catch them at 
this year's Fall CampusFest 
on Oct. 10 at 7 p.m. in 
Tippin Gym. 

Tickets are on sale now 
at the Gemmell Information 
Desk and are $15 for stu- 
dents and $25 for non-stu- 
dents. The doors will open 
at 6 p.m, and the show 
starts at 7 p.m. 

Gym Class Heroes were 
voted Best New Artist at the 
2007 VMA's on Sept. 9. They 
are part of the Verizon 
Wireless Tour and will trav- 
el to other campuses, 
including Kutztown 

University of Pennsylvania, 
University of Buffalo. 



University of Central 
Florida and many more. 

"I feel that great plan- 
ning and following the 
choices of the students has 
been essential to the success 
of UAB's recent concert 
planning. If it was not for 
the students, we would not 
have the VMA's Best New 



Artist of the Year coming to 
our campus," said junior 
business major and chair of 
CampusFest committee 
Mike Neely, 

Opening acts for Gym 
Class Heroes are DJ 
Abilities, a Minnesota based 
hip-hop disc jockey known 
for winning both the 1999 




VMA Best New Artist of the Year Gym Class Heroes will be per- 
forming Wednesday, Oct. 10. (Courtesy of UAB) 



HIp-Hop Symposium goes back to the 80s 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers@clarion.edu 

On Oct. 18, a day of 
exploration in to the world 
of hip-hop and the spoken 
arts will be available to 
Clarion University students 
and the public at this year's 
Hip-Hop Symposium. 

Hip-Hop Symposium: 
Roots-Relevance-Reaction is 
an all day event beginning 
at 9:30 a.m. and taking 
place in the Gemmell 
V Stjudent Comptejd > and 
■ Marwick-Boyd AuditoHum. 
If This year's symposium 

will delve into the begin- 
nings of hip-hop music in 
the 80s and explore its cul- 
tural impact throughout the 
decades as well as recent 
controversy surrounding it. 
It will also give students the 
opportunity to take a deeper 
look into the roots of hip-hop 
and discover its true mean- 
ing, not just what is per- 
ceived about the music from 
mainstream sources. 

"Hip-hop doesn't limit 
itself to obvious superficial 
effects such as clothing, 
dance and music. It affects 
our way of looking at the 
world as well as our identi- 
ty," said Dr. Joanne 



Washington, a driving force 
behind the organization of 
the .symposium for the last 
two years. 

The symposium will 
kick off with a showing of 
the movie "Hip-Hop^ Beyond 
Beats and Rhymes." A 
Byron Hurt film, "Hip-Hop" 
examines masculinity, sex- 
ism and violence as well as 
gender roles in hip-hop and 
rap music today 

Another featured speak- 
er is Dr. Denean Sharpley- 
Whiting of Vanderbilt 
University. Sharpley- 

Whiting, author and direc- 
tor of African American and 
Diaspora studies and direc- 
tor of the William T Bandy 
Center for Baudelaire and 
Modern French studies, will 
host a forum discussing hip- 
hop and women's images as 
seen in her book "Pimps Up, 
Ho's Down." Students will 
be able to participate in the 
forum through a student 
panel. 

The keynote of the event 
will include presentations 
by Clarion University grad- 
uate Brian Book and 
Yolanda "Yo-Yo" Whitaker. 
Cook is now a news and 
entertainment correspon- 
dent for American Urban 
Radio. Whitaker is a disc 
jockey at a Los Angeles 



radio station and one of the 
top 10 female rappers. 

New this year is a stu- 
dent artist showcase which 
will highlight student per- 
formers in poetry and the 
spoken arts. The artist 
showcase will be taking 
place all day as well. 

One of the goals of this 
year's symposium is to get 
more people throughout the 
campus involved with hip- 
hop. Hip-hop is already 
being used in some class- 
rooms at Clarion University, 
with some professors inte- 
grating the genre into their 
curriculums. 

Students who want to 
become more actively 
involved with the sympo- 
sium can gain university co- 
curricular credit through 
volunteering to help with 
the day's activities. 
Volunteers will not only be 
able to help out with the 
event but will get the oppor- 
tunity to work with a 
diverse group of students. 

"You get a real cross sec- 
tion of students working 
together," said Washington 
of the volunteers. 

The symposium is free 
and open to the public. 




and 2001 DMC Regional 
championships. Another 
guest will be The Pack, 
which consists of four mem- 
bers from the California Bay 
Area. Their "You Hear It 
P^irst" episode became the 
most downloaded in MTV 
history, and has been added 
to BET, MTV, MTV2 and 
MTVU. They also have over 
17 million plays on MySpace 
and hold the number one 
video on MTV2 with their 
hit "I'm Shinin'." 

Gym Class Heroes bring 
together elements of rap. 
rock. R&B and funk to pro- 
duce their own unique 
sound. The group doesn't fit 
into one genre because they 
are rooted in traditional 
hip-hop, however they fea- 
ture live instruments 
instead of recorded beats. 
Often touring with pop- 
punk bands. Gym Class 
Heroes were in Pittsburgh 
for the 2006 Warped Tour. 

The band's name comes 
from 1997 when MC Travis 
McCoy and drummer Matt 
McGinley became friends 
during high-school gym 




Gym Class Heroes has their own unique sound w/i/c/j combines 
rap, rock, R&B and funk. (Courtesy of UAB) 



class. The duo worked with 
other artists to create a new 
look for hip-hop, but eventu- 
ally joined together to form 
Gym Class Heroes in 2001 
with the additions of gui- 
tarist Disashi Lumumba- 
Kasongo and bassist Eric 
Roberts. 

Their first album. "For 
The Kids," was self-released 
in 2001, and their second 
album, "The Papercut 
Chronicles," was released in 



2005. The band 
then toured with Fall Out 
Boy. Midtown and The 
Academy Is.... along with 
attending Bamboozl(> and 
Warped Tour festivals. 

"I'm excited to bring 
VMA's Artist Of The Year to 
Clarion. They are an upcom- 
ing band and bring diversity 
to campus, along with bring- 
ing sales and visitors to 
Clarion," said UAB advisor 
Jamie Bero. 



"Guitar Herof' keep it rockin' 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJclbuffone@clarion.edu 

Playing the guitar has 
always been a way for peo- 
ple to express themselves, 
relieve stress and has even 
opened up a career for some. 
For the untalented people 
like myself, who don't have 
the patience to learn how to 
play a single chord, we have 
"Guitar Hero." 

The guitar simulation 
phenomenon was created in 
2005 and has taken the 



made it almost standard in 
today's dorm rooms. With 
popular songs such as 
"Carry on My Wayward 
Son" by Kansas and 
Warrant's "Cherry Pie," the 
player can feel a real con- 
nection with the song that 
he or she is playing. 

With the popularity of 
the first game. Harmonic 
Music Systems developed 
"Guitar Hero: H," which 
ultimately had more success 
than the original. A third 
installment of the game was 
released in July, "Guitar 
Hero Encore^ Rock the 80s." 



ment that are shaped like 
stars. Players can hit com- 
bos that can break their 
opponent's guitar string, 
overwhelm their amp, and 
even make their opponent 
play their "axe" left-handed. 
Players jam on the new 
wireless guitar control that 
was recently introduced to 
give an even more realistic 
experience. But the magic 
isn't over just yet i-i .^ 

The creators of "(juilkV^ 
Hero" are soon to release 
"Rock Band." Thi.s iwolu- 
tionary game doesn't just 
include a guitar, but a bass 




The "Guitar Hero" phenomenon has taken over college dorm rooms with rock songs like 
"Freebird" by Lynyrd Skynyrd and "Surrender" by Cheap Trick. "Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock" is 
scheduled for release in October. (The Clarion Call/Brittnee Koebler) 



nation by storm ever since. 
The object of the game is to 
watch the bottom of the 
screen while a song is play- 
ing. As the song progresses, 
colored lights indicating 
notes travel down the screen 
in sync with the music. The 
note colors and positions 
match those of five different 
keys positioned in a row on 
the controller that is, sure 
enough, in the shape of a 
small guitar. Once the col- 
ored notes reach the bottom 
of the television screen, the 
player must then tap the 
correct button on the con- 
troller while hitting the 
strumming bar simultane- 
ously in order to score 
points. The more notes you 
hit, the better your score is. 
The simplicity and 
excitement of this game has 



This was made for players 
looking for that specific 
genre of music to "rock out" 
to. The last full version of 
the game is set to release in 
October. "Guitar Hero IIP 
Legends of Rock" will be 
available for Playstation 2 
and 3, XBox 360 and 
Nintendo Wii consoles. 

There are plenty of new 
features, like "Battle Mode." 
where two rockers face off in 
hope of completing a song 
while successfully playing 
"Star Power" sequences to 
earn attacks that can be 
used against their oppo- 
nents. 

"Star Power" is when 
the player is able to "rock 
out" by simply lifting their 
guitar slightly in the air. 
One achieves Star Power by 
hitting all the notes in a seg- 



guitar. drums and a micro- 
phone as well. The game 
play is the same, but now a 
gamer will have some com- 
pany during the hours upon 
hours of playing. 

In the past, youth.s have 
started bands to feed their 
musical needs. Since it's hr 
easier to hit buttons on a 
controller than it is to play 
the actual instrument, i.^ it 
possible that teenagers will 
start forming "Gamer 
Bands" rather than real 
ones? Will a piece of plastic 
with keys soon replace the 
acoustic guitars of the 
world? In a society where 
everyone is looking for a 
shortcut. I wouldn't be sur- 
prised. In this country, it 
seems all too easy to become 
a "Guitar Hero." 



Page 6 



im CLAlRION CALL 



Michelle's hosts 
first Open Mic Night 



September 20, 2007 



Catch a "Firefly" and find "Serenity" 



Rachella Vollant-Barie 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ravollantb®clarion,edu 



On Sept. 13. the first 
Open Mic Night took place 
at Michelle's Cafe on Main 
Street. This event was spon- 
sored by the literary maga- 
zine. BiiZnar. 

Open Mic Night has 
been running for three years 
and consists of both poetry 
readings and music per- 
formances. It was founded 
by Matt Subel, who is also 
the founder of BaZaar. 

Jessica Schauer. co- 
Editor in- Chief of BaZaar, 
said, "It's a lot of fun. a very 
intimate atmosphere and 
people usually enjoy them. 
They bring people from the 



community and the campus 
together to show their tal- 
ent." 

William James, a poet, 
derives his motivation from 
his reactions on how he sees 
things taking place in socie- 
ty and from internal exami- 
nation. He said that he 
hopes his works will "... 
draw some termites out of 
the garage as far as poetry. I 
would like to see more kids 
do it." He has also founded 
the Web site. 

whatisl74.com, which 

includes his poetry and 
allows others to post their 
work as well. 

Musician and poet Ryan 
Waterman takes her inspi- 
ration from everthing. She 
said, "There is something to 
write about in every detail 



of our lives." 

Musician Spencer 

Marshall drives his motiva- 
tion from things that every- 
one can relate to in life. He 
finds it interesting to see 
the effects of his music on 
the audience. Although he 
plays what he thinks sounds 
good, he also likes to "get 
people to have a good time." 
The main idea behind 
Open Mic Night is to get 
BaZaars name out there 
and to satisfy those who are 
looking for something to do. 
An Open Mic Night is 
planned for one Thursday 
every month. The next one 
is scheduled to take place on 
Oct. 25 and it includes a cos- 
tume partJ^ 



Joey Pettlne 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmpettine®clarlon.eclu 





"Firefly" and "Serenity" 
Director: Joss Whedon 
Rating: 5/5 

♦♦♦♦♦ 



Steel flashes bright sil- 
ver as sword clashes upon 
sword. As we watch, we 
cheer for the man on the 
right, the rugged Han Solo- 
esque captain fighting for 
the honor and hand of his 
love, and we wish for the 
smarmy aristocrat on the 
left to be run through with 
the captain's rapier. 

Suddenly, the aristocrat 
has lost his weapon and lies 
upon the gound pouring 
blood. The crowd urges the 
captain to finish the job and 
then he lowers his weapon. 
"Mercy is the mark of a 
great man," he proudly 
states. 

Abruptly he pokes his 
enemy in the gut; Not 
killing him, just wounding 
him for no reason at all. 

"Guess I'm just a good 
man." 



He does it again. 
"Eh, I'm alright." 
It's this superb blend of 
action, drama and comedy 
that makes writer/director 
Joss Whedon's ("Buffy the 
Vampire Slayer." "Angel") 
science fiction space west- 
erns "Firefly" and 
"Serenity," the subsequent 
movie based off the can- 
celled "Firefly" series, such 
a cinematic delight. 

"Firefly" recounts the 
tale of a group of "smugglers 
for hire" who find they've 
unwittingly picked up a 
secret weapon on their ship 
that the government wants 
back. The problem is the 
weapon is a little girl. 

The 13 episode series, so 
short due to be unjustly can- 
celled, follows the plight of a 
soldier, a pilot, a thug, an 
engineer, a doctor, a human 
weapon, a preacher, a pros- 
titute and their captain as 
they elude their government 
and try to survive. 

Unfortunately to watch 
the series is only to get half 
of the story For over a year 
after the show was can- 
celled. Universal Pictures 
recognized why this short- 
lived show had such a large 
fan base and decided to cap 
off the series with 
"Serenity." 

If you haven't seen the 
series inspired film, what 
better time then with the 
release of the new two-disc 
special edition "Serenity" 
DVD? It includes over three 
documentaries, two feature 
length commentaries and 
even the special "Firefly" 
internet episodes not previ- 




ously avail.il)lf oil DVD. A 
must buy 

For what makes 
"Firefly" and "Serenity" sii 
watchable? And why should 
you out there immediately 
purchase the "Firefly" and 
"Serenity" DVDs'? It's the 
perfect balance of fast paced 
science fiction action with 
spaceships and massive bat- 
tles with the brilliant film- 
ing, acting, cinematography, 
score, etc. 

You can watch the 
episode "The Message" and 
make note of the well com- 
posed music, shaky camera 
as if portraying real life, and 
realistic intimacy of the 
actors in the snowy funeral 
scene. Then you can watch 
"Serenity" and perch your- 
self on the edge of your seat 
as you watch a little girl 
take on an entire bar in a 
beautifully choreographed 
fight. 

Overall, if you enjoy 
good science fiction, west- 
erns, action, drama, comedy, 
romance, sex. anything and 
especially if you haven't 
seen them and are live, then 
you absolutely need to see 
"Firefly" and "Serenity." 



Spencer Marsha// performs Thursday Sept. 13 at Michelle's Cafe on Main Street. Marshali'gets 
the ideas for his music from things that he believes his audience will find easy to relate to (The 
Clarion Call/ Angela Kelly) 

Chucic and Larry 
pleases ail crowds 



n-apt tries to "Stay Alive" 



Travis Lear 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_twlear@clarion.edu 




Amber Stockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alstockhol@clarion.edu 




"I Now Pronounce You 
Chuck and Larry" 
Director: Dennis Dugan 
Rating: 4/5 



Can't decide which 
movie to go out and spend 
your hard earned eight dol- 
lars on? Well then, let me 
help you out. "I Now 
Pronounce You Chuck and 
Larry" is an epic tale of 
brotherhood, friendship and 
love that leaves its audience 
pleased with their choice. 

When you combine 
favorites Adam Sandler and 
Kevin James, you are bound 
to get a hilariously funny 
and heartwarming movie. 
Two best friends and fire- 
fighters. Chuck Levine 
(Sandler) and Larry 
Valentine (James), have to 
test their courage and 
friendship after Larry's wife 
dies and his children are left 
with no beneficiary money. 



firefighter in the bustling 
city of New York, he learns 
the only way to ensure that 
the children will be in good 
hands, both physically and 
financially, is to marry, and 
fast. 

How far would you go 
for one of your friends? 
Would you babysit, lend 
them money or marry them? 
Chuck learns quickly just 
what he would do and 
embarks on a journey that 
changes his life. 

The storyline sounds 
great, right? Well, for the 
hilarious duo things aren't 
quite that easy. 

In the state of New York, 
it seems that a plan like 
theirs is considered fraud. 
So when the state comes 
nosing around to expose 
their scandal, the two are 
forced to pretend to be love- 
struck newlyweds. With the 
guidance of their lawyer, 
Alex McDonough (Jessica 
Biel), they learn being mar- 
ried strictly on paper won't 
do the trick and definitely 
will not keep the pair from a 
run in with the law. 

The transition from best 
friends to life partners isn't 
an easy one for the two het- 
erosexual men. Both men 
fall for their heartthrob 
lawyer, are harassed by 
their firemen friends and 
are questioned by members 
of the community. However, 
when they are put under 
pressure, they do what's 
neccessary and win every- 
one's hearts in the process. 
Overall I gave the film 




"Trapt Live!" 
Trapt 
Rating: 3/5 



Sppincr an Vnlpntinp is a fmir nnf rtf fn-o It 



thought the message of the 
film was great and one 
everyone should consider 
regardless of your sexual 
preferences, race or beliefs. 
Everyone has the right to 
love and love who they 
want. 

Does the plan actually 
work? Do they end up life 
partners forever? Or does 
the state of New York cut 
the great pretenders a 
break? Well you're just 
going to have to go out and 
see this charming comedy to 
find out. 

This movie is great to 
see with friends, family or 
even your significant other. 
Not only is it good for a few 
laughs, you might even 
learn a little something 
from the light hearted flick. 
The cast includes talents 
like Dave Matthews, Lance 
Bass and Dan Aykroyd that 
help to keep the laughs com- 
ing and the movie interest- 
ing. Whether you're an 
action fan, a die hard 
romantic or a comedy lover, 
you're sure to find some- 
thing you like about "Chuck 
and Larry" and their lessons 
on life and friendship. 



"But now I have learned 
to trust myself/ And I don't 
need anyone else/ Out of 
room/ Out of places to hide/ 
Backed up in the corner/ I 
know I will stay alive." After 
over a decade together, 
Trapt finally seems to have 
hit the big stage. 

Their newest release, 
"Trapt Live!," the band fea- 
tures two new songs: "Stay 
Alive" and "Everything to 
Lose." 

With these two new 
songs being released, it 
gives fans an indication of 
the direction the band is 
going in the near future. 

In a recent interview 
with MusicRemedy.com, 
lead guitarist Simon 
Ormandy said, "We haven't 
really had anything out for 
awhile and wanted to give 
the fans something new and 
indicative of what we're try- 
ing to do. 'Everything to 
Lose' is probably the heavi- 



est thing we've ever done. 
These two new songs are 
pretty unique sounding for 
us." 

In fact, "Stay Alive" 
directly referes to the life of 
the band and the struggles 
that they have gone through 
to get to where they are 
today. 

The band was formed in 
1997 in Los Gatos, 
California by lead 
vocalist/guitarist Chris 
Brown, Ormandy and 
bassist Pete Charell. 
Shortly after doing small 
gigs in Los Gatos and some 
surrounding towns and 
cities, the band added drum- 
mer Aaron "Monty" 
Montgomery. 

Within their first year, 
the band landed opening 
acts for mega artist Papa 
Roach. By the end of 1998, 
Trapt released their second 
self-released album, 

"Amalgamation," but the 
band was facing problems. 

Both Ormandy and 
Brown were attending class- 
es of the University of 
California at Santa Barbara 
and were unable to 
rehearse. Because of this, 
the band was only able to 
release one album before the 
turn of the millennium. 

The band seemed 
doomed, yet they were 
determined to "Stay Alive." 
Finally in September 
2001, Warner Brothers 
Records gave Trapt a deal. 
After that, the band went on 
to release several singles. 

The bands first major 
single, "Headstrong," came 
in 2003, reaching number 
one of the U.S. Modern Rock 
and U.S. Mainstream Rock 




charts and as high as num- 
ber 16 on the U.S. Hot 100 
chart. Alor..; 'vith the 
release of th'^ii iir,-t single 
came "StilUr inu> " which 
reached numi an well 

on the I'.s, Mainstream 
Rock chart but never broke 
the U.S. Hot 100. 

The l)and never reached 
the Top 100 again. However, 
with the release of their two 
new singles, the band is 
looking to make a comeback. 
Although "Stay Alive" 
and "Everything to Lose" 
are two great songs, I can- 
not see them breaking into 
the Top 100. but they may 
possibly reach the Top 10 on 
U.S. Mainstream Rock and 
U.S. Modern Rock. 

I give the two new sin- 
gles three leaves, at most 
3.5 leaves. They did not 
come anywhere close to the 
pinnacle of "Headstrong" or 
"Stillframe." but are still 
good songs that belong in 
almost any music library. 

Perhaps the band's new 
album release in the near 
future will prove to be the 
redeeming factor that will 
bring Trapt back to the front 
of the modern rock world, or 
maybe it will finally finish 
the band off and place them 
at the bottom once more. 



f 



Do you need 
some help usin 
the library? 



tome to one oi Carlson 
library's open sef^sions' 







Reservations are recommended and can 
be made by calling Ms. Karen Sheesman 
at 393-1841. These sessions meet in the 
Level 2 Instruction Lab in Carlson Library 
(Room #201). For the class schedule and 
descriptions, visit 

www.clarion.edu/library/teachlngscheduIe.shtml 
We hope to see you soon! 



I 



Page? 



TM CLARION CitLL 



ClissilMs 



September 20. 2007 



fireek Ids, Travel, Emplopent, For Renl, IVrsonals, and (i wdl Ids 




I.AKKN APARTMKNTS- 

fully furnished. Utilities 
Included. .Available Fall 
2()()H/Spring 2009 for ]-;i 
people. Houses available for 
2-8 people-. Kxceptionally 
nice and CLEAN. Call Pattv 
at (814) 745-;U21 or 229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
ments.net 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
C.O TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562-1020 



Spruig Ikvdk 2UU8 . Sell 
Tiips. Earn Cash and Go 
Free. Call for group dis- 
ft'unt.s. Best Prices 
(Guaranteed! Jamaica, 
Cancun. Acapulco, 

Bahamas. S. Padre, Florida. 
800-648-4849 or 

www.ststravel.com 




Congratulations to the won- 
derful Call staff and your 
new advisor for a great 
start to the 2007-08 aca- 
demic year. You've done a 



MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

acemontana@ccybernet.com 

(814)226-7316 

PAW wn Bv mi CANvwAn 



good job and I know the 
paper will get better and 
better. 

With love, 
from Dr. H. 

Shaun, 

Thanks for coming to visit! 

I miss you! 

-Lindsay 

Dr. Hilton (Mom of the 

Clarion Call), 

Thanks for your continued 

support for The Call! We 

miss you and expect you to 

visit weekly! 

- The Call Staff 

Brittnee, 

CONGRATS! We are proud 

of you and can't wait until 

we all have matching BK t- 

shirts! 

-The Clarion Call staff 

Mommy and Daddy, 
Sorry I hurt Harold. 
Love, BK 

Shasta, 
PENALTY! 
Love, the king 

King, 

Gangsta accent! We need 
more roadtrips to Bucknell. 
-Penalty girl 



How much do you know about 

The Pittsburgh Steelers? 



Take the "Steelers" Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay Grystar 

1. True or False. The Pittsburgh Steelers were the first NFL team with cheerleaders 

a) True 

b) False 

2. What year did the Steelers merge with the Philadelphia Eagles to form the 
Steagles? 

a) That never happened 

b) 1933 

c) 1943 

d) 1944 

3. How much did the Steelers cost when they were bought in 1933'' 

a) $1000 b) $2500 

c) $2000 d) $3000 



4. Who was the head coach in 1957? 

a) Cowher b) Parker 

c) Austin d) Nixon 

5. What year was the "Immaculate Reception?" 

a) 1970 b) 1960 

c) 1972 d) 1980 




'o-g 'B-^ 'qg '3'g 'Bi.saaMsuy 




Aaron Russell, 

Freshman, Chemistry 
■'Chandler Dining Hall, because it often 
seems small, and the students wait in long 
lines for food." 



By 
Jessica Lasher 

''What project do you 
think should stand 
as the university's 
highest priorityr 




Emily Byrtus 

SOFHOMOKIO. (".HAPHIC DESIGN 

"Some students are not satisfied with 

Chandler and Gemmell. With more variety 

between dining facilities and coffee shops, 

Clarion students would be happy students." 





Jessica Elser 

Junior, Mass Media Arts and 

Journalism 

"The most important project on campus is 
for faculty and other active members of the 

community to spread the word concerning 
changes in academic majors and minors, so 

the students would be better informed to 
make important decisions. 



Chad Buerk 

Senior, Secondary Education 

Math 

"Education." 



Brian Maul 

Senior, Theatre 

"Campbell Hall- to see it either torn down 

or made habitable." 



Maddy CuKnE 

Freshman, Mass Media Arts and 

Journalism 
'The Science Center. Removing the con- 
struction equipment off campus would allow 
math and science students to get well-situ- 
ated within their majors." 




__ 



Pages 



Tm CLARION CALL 



Sfirts 



September 20. 2007 



Mf: terMformndinPSiCU GoliwinsHiiniiiiseDhvite 



Volleyball suffers first defeat of season 3-2 to California 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.eclu 

CLARION. Sept. 19 - The 
old adage "All good things 
must come to an end," can 
be used to describe many 
different things, and unfor- 
tunately for the Golden 
Eagle volleyball team, it 
was being said of them 
Tuesday night. In their 
13th game of the 2007 sea- 
son, the Golden Eagles tast- 
ed defeat for the first time 
losing their PSAC-West 
home opener to California 3- 
2. 

After dropping the first 
game 30-21, the Golden 
Eagles came back to win the 
next two by scores of 30-24 
and 30-16. However, Cali- 
fornia would not go away as 
they won the next game 30- 
22 before going on to win the 
fifth game 15-12, and the 
match. 

Outside hitter Christina 
Steiner led the way with 22 
kills and 14 digs. Right 
behind her was Sarah Fries 
who added 17 kills of her 
own. Fries also led the team 
in digs with 22 narrowly 
edging out the 20 from 




The Golden Eagles volleyball team pictured above started the season 12-0. Clarion lost their last 
game to California 3-2. The Golden Eagles next home game will be September 25 when they take 
on lUP. (The Clarion Call/Mam Huff) 



Vicky Gentile. Kristi Fio- 
rillo picked up 57 assists 
along with 17 digs for the 
Golden Eagles. 

It was the first time the 
Golden Eagles had gone to 
five games this season. 



They suffered as many 
game defeats (three) in this 
match as they had all sea- 
son. With the loss, the vol- 
leyball team is now 12-1 on 
the season with a 1-1 record 
in the PSAC-West. 



Despite the setback, the 
Golden Eagles are remain- 
ing as focused as ever. "We 
just need to keep playing 
together and get back to 
what's been working for us," 
said Gentile. 



Steiner added that, "We 
need to cut down on the 
minor errors. That was a 
big reason we lost tonight." 
The 12-0 start by 
Clarion was the best in 
school history beating the 
old record of 9-0 which was 
set by the 2002 team. That 
squad of Golden Eagles 
would go on to finish 31-5 en 
route to making the NCAA 
playoffs for the first time in 
school history. 

In other volleyball 
action, the Golden Eagles 
accomplished something 
last Saturday they had not 
done since the 2002 season, 
beating Lock Haven. Losing 
the first game 30-28, 
Clarion stormed back to win 
the next three games by 
scores of 30-25, 30-22, and 
30-26. Fries led all Golden 
Eagles with 23 kills, while 
Steiner and Amanda 
Anger meier added 18 and 
13 kills respectively. 

Lock Haven had been 
the last PSAC-West oppo- 
nent that this current group 
of Golden Eagles had not 
defeated. Gentile called it, 
'The biggest win of our col- 
lege career, at least for me." 
Gentile also noted that beat- 



ing Lock Haven, "was kind 
of like jumping over a men- 
tal barrier since we had 
never beaten them before." 

Adding to the good news 
for the Golden Eagles was 
senior outside hitter Fries. 
The Ohio native captured 
the third consecutive PSAC- 
West Player of the Week 
award for the Golden 
Eagles. Overall this season, 
Fries has 166 kills as well as 
109 digs. Going into their 
game against California, 
she was second in the PSAC 
in kills behind teammate 
Christina Steiner. 

The volleyball team will 
be on the road this weekend 
as they travel to 
Philadelphia to play Bloom- 
field and Holy Family at 
Holy Family University. 
Their next PSAC-West 
match up will be next 
Tuesday when they take on 
Indiana in Tippin 
Gymnasium. Game time is 
7 p.m. 

Author's Note- Last 
week we reported that for- 
mer Golden Eagle Lauren 
Carter had graduated. She 
has transferred to another 
university, and we apologize 
for the error. 



Football sta ys close early but falls to 23rd ranked West Chester 49-21 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sJsscritchf@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 15 - On 
Saturday night, the Golden 
jEagles fell, to: the 23rd 
pnked West Chester 
Golden Rams by a score of 
49-21. Clarion got off to a 
quick start, scoring the first 
touchdown of the game on a 
1-yard run by quarterback 
Tyler Huether. 



Coach Foster split time 
between quarterbacks on 
Saturday, with Huether 
going 9-18 for 102 yards and 
three touchdowns, and Gino 
Rometo. Rometo went 5-11 
for 46 yards. 

West Chester quarter- 
back Bill Zwann went 14 of 
19 for 354 yards and five 
touchdowns. 

After the Golden Eagles' 
first score of the game, the 
Golden Rams bounced back 
with a score of their own 



when Zwann hit Steve 
Miller for a 6-yard touch- 
down pass to tie the game at 
7-7. West Chester scored 
again on a touchdown pass 
from Zwann to Darrell 
Canty to put them ahead of 
Clarion 14-7. 

In the second quarter 
Clarion re-tied the game, 
when Alfonso Hoggard 
hauled in an 11 -yard touch- 
down pass from Huether, 
making the score 14-14. 
The Golden Rams answered 



right back with a 5-yard 
touchdown run by Osagie 
Osunde to put West Chester 
up 21-14. 

Midway through the 
second, Huether threw an 
11-yard touchdown pass to 
Pierre Odom, once again 
tying the game. With ju?t 
over four minutes remain- 
ing in the first half, Ryan 
Paulson caught a 55-yard 
pass from Zwann for a 
touchdown, which put West 
Chester ahead for good 28- 



Golf takes first at Hal Hansen Invite 



21. 

With 1:29 remaining in 
the first half, Miller caught 
his second touchdown pass 
of the game to put West 
Chester ahead 35-21. 

The Golden Rams 
tacked on th^r last two 
scores in the third quarter. 
The first was Osunde's sec- 
ond touchdown of the game, 
a 23-yard touchdown run, to 
put West Chester up 42-21. 
Their last score of the game 
came on a Mike Washington 



Denise Simens 

Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_dnsimens@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 18 - The 
Clarion golf team teed off its 
season September 7 and 8 at 
the Ohio Valley Tournament 
in Mineral Wells, WV. Day 
one left Clarion tied for 
sixth place with a score of 
301, and the next day's final 
score gave them a fifth place 
finish, tying with 
Charleston at 594. 

Nick Sanner (So. 
Markleton) and Jared 
Schmader (Fr. Cooperstown- 
Maplewood) had strong 
showings in their Clarion 
debuts. 

Sanner shot 3-over-par, 
with a two-day total of 145, 
while Schmader shot a 4- 
overpar 146. 

Preston Mullens (Sr. 
Emporium-Cameron 
County) and Justin Moose 
(Sr. N.Huntingdon-Norwin) 
finished at 4-over-par and 6- 
over-par respectively. 

The team continued 
their success the following 



Sunday, when they compet- 
ed in the Glenville State 
Invitational in Parkersburg, 
WV. The Golden Eagles tied 
for first place with Fairmont 
University finishing at 590. 
Sanner and Schmader once 
again led Clarion, tying at 
142 and both finishing as 
tournament medal runners 
up. 

Last weekend, the 
Golden Eagles hosted the 
Hal Hansen Tournament at 
the Clarion Oaks Golf Club 
in Clarion, PA. Clarion won 
the invite with a score of 
603, while the Clarion "B" 
team finished second with a 
score of 608. Third place 
went to lUP (616), fourth 
was West Liberty (621), and 
the fifth place finish went to 
Millersville (625). 

The two day tourna- 
ment was led by senior 
Justin Moose, who shot 74, 
75 for total of 149 and a 
third place finish. Sixth 
place went to junior Justin 
Cameron, who shot 80, 72- 
152, with Schmader win- 
ning 13th place with scores 
of 80, 74- 154. Mullens shot 



79, 76- 155 for a 17th place 
finish, while Sanner's scores 
of 73, 85-158 placed him at 
30th. 

Freshman Kevin Smith 
of the Clarion "B" squad tied 
for individual scores with 
Moose with 73, 76-149 for a 
third place overall finish. 

Sophomore Mike De- 
Angelo tied for 6th place 
with a 75, 77- 152, while 
13th went to Sophomore 
Sean Foust with a score of 
75, 79- 154. Freshman Ben 
Kamnikar (82, 75-157) tied 
for 25th and junior Nick 
Brucker (78, 81-159) was 
32nd overall. 

The team's next compe- 
tition is the Wheehng Jesuit 
Invitational on September 
24 and 25 in Moundsville, 
WV. Last year the Golden 
Eagles won the tournament 
by 9 shots. 

The Golden Eagles will 
then have two matches 
remaining, the Westminster 
Invitational on October 1 
and the Robert Morris 
Invitational on October 8 
and 9, before the PSAC's on 
October 20 and 21. 



79-yard touchdown pass, 
resulting in a 49-21 lead. 

The Golden Eagles 
matched the Golden Rams 
in first downs, both teams 
had 19. Clarion had 143 
rushing yards and 148 pass- 
ing yards. The defense gave 
up a total of 572 yards, 206 
rushing yards and 366 pass- 
ing yards. 

The Golden Eagles next 
game is Saturday, Sept- 
ember 22 when they host 
Bloomsburg (1-2). 



A look back at this summer in sports 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_kgschr<:^r®ctarton.edu 



Summer 2007 will offi- 
cially end tomorrow. As we 
trade in our t-shirts and 
shorts for hoodies and sweat 
pants, let's take a look back 
at what dominated the 
sports headlines over the 
summer. 

In the Steel City, the 
Pirates left us counting 
down the days to Latrobe for 
the loth year in a row. The 
Penguins gave us a glimpse 
of what will hopefiiUy be 
things to come for the next 
several seasons. The Stee- 
lers decided to celebrate 
their 75th season by intro- 
ducing Bill Cowher's long- 
lost brother SteelyMcBeam 
as their new mascot. 

Tom Glavine became the 
latest, and possibly the last, 
pitcher to join the 300 win 
club. The Houston Astros 
Craig Biggio joined the 
3,000 hit club. On the same 
day that Biggio achieved his 
milestone, Frank Thomas 



made some history of his 
own by joining the 500 home 
rtm club. Soon to be even 
richer, Alex Rodriguez and 
White Sox slugger Jim 
Thome would also go on to 
become members of the 500 
home run club, 

The Philadelphia Phil- 



San Francisco faithful. Not 
in attendance, baseball com- 
missioner Bud Selig phoned 
in to offer Bonds his con- 
patulations. 

Tiger Woods continued 
to be Tiger winning the 2007 
PGA Championship. The 
win gave Woods his 13th 



lies became the first profes- Major win, bringing him one 
sional sports franchise to closer to the record of 18 



inmr 10,000 losses with a 
10-2 loss to the St. Louis 
Cardinals on July 15th. The 
Baltimore Orioles added a 
milestone loss of their own 
by becoming the first team 
in over one hundred years to 
allow 30 runs. Even more 
dubiously, Texas pitcher 



currently held by Jack 
Nicklaus. Off the course, 
Woods made headlines by 
becoming a father for the 
first time on June 18th 
when his wife, Elin, gave 
birth to daughter Sam 
Alexis Woods. 

LeBron James took his 



West Littleton managed to first major step in overtak 
hold his team's 27 run lead ing MJ by leading the 



and pick up the save for the 
30-3 win. 

And of coiu^e, baseball 
crowned a new home run 



Cleveland Cavaliers to the 
NBA Finals. Despite being 
told we were watching histo- 
ry in the making, the Cavs 



king. On August 7, Barry would go on to lose to the 

Bonds homered off of "boring" San Antonio Spurs 

Washington's Mike Bacsik four games to none. Some 

to become the new all-time good news for Ibny Parker 

horarmn leader. Former though. Not only did he get 

champ Henry Aaron deliv- a championship ring, he 

er«d a gracious video-taped married Eva Lon^ria. 

address to ]^nds and the - «»,..„.-.«... 

See "SUMMER" on page 



Cross Country finishes in second place at California Invitational 



Denise Simens 

Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_dnsimens@clarion.edu 

LOCK HAVEN, Sept. 17 - 
The Women's cross country 
team opened their season 
September 8 at Roadman 
Park in California, PA. 
Clarion's 40 points took sec- 
ond place overall to Grove 
City College's 30 points. 
Clarion's top five run- 



ners finished in the top 15 
overall, led by a first place 
finish by senior Erin 
Richard. Richard, who was 
East Regional Runner of the 
Year last year, finished the 
race with a time of 18:35.70. 
She was closely followed 
by junior teammate Caithn 
Palko (sixth), junior Molly 
Smathers (lOth), senior 
Kate Ehrensberger (l3th), 
and sophomore Lisa Nickel 
(15th). 



Last weekend, the team 
traveled to Lock Haven to 
compete in the eight team 
invitational. The Lock 
Haven invitational was the 
Golden Eagles first time 
competing against teams 
from the PSAC conference. 
Clarion took sixth overall, 
and many runners had a lot 
of strong personal bests. 

The highest placing run- 
ner was Richard, who fin- 
ished in second place. She 



had a best time by 1^40, and 
currently has the fastest 
time in the region to date 
this year. 

Coach Resch feels that 
she is looking strong and 
has already gotten ahead of 
schedule on her goals and 
achievements for the year. 

The Golden Eagles next 
meet will take place in 
Latrobe, PA at the St. 
Vincent Invitational on 
September 22. 



Clarion then only has 
two meets left, until the 
Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference Championships. 

The PSAC's are October 
27, and NCAA Regionals are 
November 3. Typically, run- 
ners try to qualify for 
regionals at PSAC's, and at 
regionals try to qualify for 
nationals. 

This year, regionals are 
being held at Lock Haven, 
on the same course that the 



runners ran this past week- 
end. 

Coach Resch is hoping 
that will give his team an 
advantage for later in the 
fall. Resch felt that these 
first couple meets of the 
year have been a good pre- 
view of what lies ahead for 
the rest of the year, and that 
the team is still learning 
and growing in experience. 



September 20. 2007 



TMCLAMONCALL 



Page 9 



Soccer tie s Edinboro 2-2, remain tied for second in PSAC West 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_tckovalovs®clarlon.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 17 - The 
Golden Eagle soccer team 
capped a busy week with a 
2-2 tie to Edinboro on 
Monday, keeping them at 
.500 for the year in confer- 
ence play. 

First half goals by 
Rachael Schmitz and 
Hillary Dieter gave Clarion 
a 2-0 lead, but Edinboro tied 
it in the second half 
Goalkeeper Jess Reed 
played all 110 minutes of 
the game, racking up six 
saves. The defensive unit, 
led by Rebecca Waterhouse, 
prevented Edinboro from 
breaking the tie. 

Earlier in the week, 
Clarion traveled to 
Mansfield and East 
Stroudsburg. After shutting 
out Mansfield 1-0, the 



Golden Eagles fell to East 
Stroudsburg 6-0. 

'The East Stroudsburg 
game was pure adrenaline 
until we ran out," said coach 
Nina Alonzo. "Coming off 
the Mansfield game only 
two days before and getting 
back on a bus for 4 hours did 
not help us again. East 
Stroudsburg is a contender 
and very strong. We needed 
more rest to compete with 
that team. Under the cir- 
cumstances, the girls fought 
and continued to play hard." 

At East Stroudburg, the 
Golden Eagles gave up 29 
shots while only producing 
three of their own. Team- 
mates Tara Takac and 
Kailyn Buckley each scored 
two goals for the Warriors. 
Golden Eagles backup goal- 
keeper, Jenna Kulik, came 
on in relief of starting goal- 
keeper Jess Reed, totaling 
twelve minutes. 

The Mansfield shutout 



was Reed's second shutout 
of the season. Despite los- 
ing a player from a red card 
near the end of the first half 
Clarion kept the pressure on 
Mansfield by posting ten 
shots in the second half 
Beth Ellen Dibeler notched 
the game-winner in the 31st 
minute on a corner kick. 

Despite being outscored 
8-26, Clarion is 2-2-1 in the 
PSAC-West. They are cur- 
rently tied for second place 
with Edinboro for second 
place in the division, five 
points behind leading 
Slippery Rock. 

Coach Alonzo added, 
"Although we are at .500, we 
are right at our goals for the 
season and working our way 
to exceed our expectations 
as the season continues." 

Clarion has an easier 
week than last, only playing 
one game. They stay home 
to take on Kutztown Friday. 




Beth Ellen Dibeler (number 25) is pictured above during a recent Golden Eagles soccer matcha- 
gainst Edinboro on September 17, Clarion tied Edinboro 2-2 and the two teams remain tied for 
second place in the PSAC-West division. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 



Tennis im proves record to 2-1 with win against Westminster 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 19 - The 
Golden Eagles tennis team 
defeated Westminster on 
September 17. The win 
improved Clarion's record to 
2-1 on the young season. 

In the win Corin 
Rombach, Lisa Baumga- 
rtner, Kassie Leuschel and 
Ashleigh Hinds all picked 
up victories in their singles 
matches. 

"The team is looking 
good. We are coming togeth- 
er as a team and work 
hard every day at practice to 
get better for the champi- 
ohsHtp seasOn^ ;m ''' 'thy' 
spring," said coach Loi*i 
Sabatose. 

The Golden Eagles also 
won two of the three doubles 
games in the match against 
Westminster. 

The team of Corin and 
Devin Rombach defeated 
Dana Larson and Christina 
Commisso 9-7. The team of 
Baumgartner and Leuschel 
defeated April Scudere and 
Hilary Newman 8-1. 

"I am really impressed 
with how hard Lisa 
Baumgartner and Kassie 
Leuschel have worked this 



past summer," said 
Sabatose. 

The Golden Eagles 
started their season on 
September 14 with a win 
against East Stroudsburg at 
Bloomsburg University. 

Clarion won the match 
5-4, with Corin Rombach, 
Baumgartner, Leuschel and 
Hinds all winning their sin- 



gles matches. 

The team of Corin and 
Devin Rombach won their 
doubles match 8-2. 

The Golden Eagles took 
on Bloomsburg in their sec- 
ond match of the season. 

Clarion lost the match 
6-3. Corin Rombach and 
Leuschel won their singles 
matches. The team of 



Brittany Bovalino and 
Greta Shepardson won their 
doubles match. 

"The team is doing very 
well. We lost some Kristen 
Jack, Megan and Amy 
Robertson, but we've also 
added a few new people," 
said Sabatose. "Devin 
Rombach transferred in and 
we have a lot of freshman 



battling it out." 

The Golden Eagles will 
travel back to Bloomsburg 
on Friday September 21 to 
take on LeMoyne College. 

Clarion will then be 



competing in a singles and 
doubles tournament for the 
NCAA East Region in 
Bloomsburg from 

September 22-24. 




The Golden Eagles tennis team is pictured in action during their match against Westminster on 
September 17. Clarion won the match 6-3. The next home match for the Golden Eagles will be on 
September 25 against Ashland. (The Clarion Call/Mam Huff) 



"SUMIWER" from 
page 6 

The dynamic duo of Greg 
Oden and Kevin Durant led 
to rampant speculation as to 

iwho would be taken first in 
_ the NBA draft. After exten- 
sive research and several 
interviews, the Portland 
TVail Blazer decided to put 
their future in Oden's rather 
large hands, while the 
Sonics had to "settle" for 
Durant. Looks like the 
Sonics are getting the first 
laugh on this one though 
after the news that Oden 
will be out for the 2007-2008 
season after undergoing 
micro-fracture surgery on 
his knee. 

Kobe Bryant was not 
traded, but Kevin Garnett 
was. The perennial All-Star 
was dealt to the Celtics for 
roughly the entire Boston 
roster and a plethora of 
draft picks. The Celtics 
would make even more 
waves by adding Ray Allen 
as well as attempting to 



coax Reggie Miller out of 
retirement. 

And oh yeah, some ref 
eree named Tim Donaghy 
threw David Stern and the 
entire NBA for a loop by 
admitting to having mafia 
ties. Mr. Donaghy 's role was 
to affect game outcomes in 
. order to make gambling 
spreads. T\ims out a lot of 
those NBA-ref conspiracy 
theorists may have been 
right after all. 

Last, but most certajnl^ 
not least, tetter Musoii, 
Roger Cossack, and Kelly 
Naqi received incredible 
amounts of air time on 
ESPN discussing the legal 
issues of Michael Vick. 
Because of his ties with a 
dog-fighting ring organized 
by him and his friends, Vick 
will be trading in his 
Falcons jersey for an orange 
jumpsuit some time in the 
near future. Talk about a 
fall from grace. 

That's your 2007 sports 
summer. Here's hoping that 
winter is just as memorable. I 




Flag Football Results 

MIMI 

UfttouchaNes St Nuc Una 

Lockdown X-Fa«or 

Peoples Champ hn hjshtrs 



HcLovjn 

SUttfePfgs 

W« Can't B«t 33-20 

hits^ 4S-I4 

Nt$$inw/Sat. 44-26 



Your Horn 
KSAC 

Mean HacNne 
Chlcka ChkJca 
De$troy«r$ 

mmi 

IfttiegMts 
Your Horn 
Cookits Mon 

F^irpfeCokaK T1»tT«m 
Mclovin Goonles 

Click Clad n 
FNR Mac Attack 

Crimon Crim D-$ Destroy 

umi 

StNUC-LANA Fninchbt 
Untouchables X ^ctor 
We Can't Beat Team hr\k% 



2W 

62-12 

42-9 

SS.2 

4242 



J 



m 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

DoMgKntpp- Intramural. Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Penthouse 

RyBalt 

UfhtsOut 



Sasquach 
3 in 3 Out 
KSAC 

Mejw hbcNne 
Lock Down 



Little Giants 
S. Uttle Rfs 
We Can't Beat 
Busch 
CNckaChicka 

Beach Volleyball Results 

fii§M 

Off in the Shower Dirty MartWs F 



29.(8 
53-12 
56-14 
31-23 
F 
7M 
41-26 
31-9 

P 
$94 
56-28 
42-12 
374) 

F 
33-0 
41-9 



GOLF SCRAMBLE 

Holiday, 9/24 & Tuesday. m$ 

Chrhn Oaks Coimtry Club 

Register your mm (up to 4 players) 
at the Rec ceoter, then all the 
course at 226-8888 to reserve a tee 
time This s an 18 hole best ball 
scramble. Studwit price is $12.50 
wtiidi indudes art!! 

(Please follow all coum policies.) 
To (^liff for the IM prize you must 
turn your completed scoreard imo 
die IM oflfke by noon on Wed. 9/26. 
Scoreard playoff will be used In ase 
of a tie. 

Dodgeball Results 

MMI 

We Want Sheetz Ranch 44 

Grit hfasty Ranch 44 

We Want Sheect The ftindas 

The f^ndas S. Uttle P^ 

Wilk 5 Team Steak 

Cincinnati Bonties Wilk 5 

4$outi< S.UeleP^ 

Team St«k Balzanya F 

Grit hbsty Sl Nuc-Lana 



9/20/07 



" ■ "iMm wn> i [ i Mi,M t m mti tm 



Volleyball Result 

9/18/07 

Will Work for Delta Zeta F 

ZTA Tteeaamm 21-11.21-17 

CURnest CU Girls I6.2I» 21-13. 15-11 

9/17/07 

WL Banner Yes or No 21-13, 2M3 




CU's Finest Delta Zeta 
WW for Sets Bailers 
Wolverines No Names 
In Your Face Dysfunctional 
Maria Martin Ugly Stick 

mmi 



F 
21-12.21-8 
F 
F 
F 

21-6,217 
F 



Ugly Stick 2I.8J|.|S 



2-0 

2. 1 
2-0 
F 
2- 1 

2-0 
F 
F 
F 



CU Girls Team 2 

Yes or No Mara Martin 

W L Banner 

9/12/07 

In your Face Yes or No 21-17,21-15 

^LChallll U| Stick 21-17. 25.23.15-10 

Dysfunctional Woh^erines F 

Outdoor Soccer Results 

9/1^07 



Team Crash 

Barbous 

Duntop 

ma/17 

St. Brno's Fire 
Team Crash 



RefheKsMom 4-1 

&itoun|e 3-0 

Ptorkchops S-l 

Porkchopll 3-1 

Refiner's Mom F 



Intramurars on die Web 
clarion.edu/intramurals 



United yyay 5 K Rari> 

Saturday, 9/30 @ 9:00 am 

Kick off the Autumn L^f festivities with 
a 5K road race to bwiefit tire United 
Way of Clarion Coumy. Stop by the 
REC to pick up a registration sheet Be 
one of die first 350 to register and get a 
free T-shirt. CUP students receive half 
price d^l comesy of the IM office!! 
Race day r^stration starts at 7:30 am at 
d»e stadium. The road race b^ns at die 
comer of Main St and 2*** Ave. and ends 
on tile CUP rack. Cash prizes awarded 
to die top 3 male and female runners. 

Tennis Results 

9/18/07 
Morgan Wtlsch 
Samantiia Specht 
M^fl (Arsons 
John Burnett 
Andrew Smith 
Nick Caggiano 
VitoAddalK 



%n Hlrm 6*4 
Kara BJazonczyk 6-0 
liann Lawhead 6-0 
Zach Stemmetz 
Devin Burda 
Robb Lawr^ice 
Reed&irietti 



6-1 
6-1 
6-1 
6-1 



L^t Chance to register - 9/2 i 

Flag Football. Volleyball. Tenws, Do<|geball. 
Frtsbee. Soccer. Beach Volh^ll 



J 



Page 10 





Abgar speaks out 
about hazing 



4 




Check out the 
upcoming events 
for October 





CUP tennis takes 
second 



see pg. 



Q 



One copy free 




CALL 



THEC 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



CUP budget to be balanced by end of 2008 fiscal year 



^ 



Volume 94 Issue 3 



September 27. 200 



OARION UHIVBISnY BUDGET 199e-2007 



i 




UndMgnatod 
ftndMby 
IMklt Rtdyctton 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ieericksonOclarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 24 - The 
Council of Trustees 
announced a plan that will 
make Clarion University's 
budget balanced by the end 
of the 2008 fiscal year. The 
fiscal year begins on July 1 



and ends on June 30 of the 
following year. 

In the past, Clarion 
University has not been 
close to having a balanced 
budget, according to Paul 
Bylaska, the Vice President 
for Finance and 

Administration. 

Bylaska said, "I have 
been here for 20 years and 



the budget hasn't been bal- 
anced for at least that long." 

When it comes to a col- 
lege's budget there are 
many parts and compo- 
nents. 

There are four major 
funds, Educational and 
General Funds, Auxiliary 
Enterprise Funds, 

Restricted Funds and Plant 



Funds. 

Educational & General 
Funds are from unrestricted 
sources such as tuition, fees 
and state appropriation that 
have been provided for gen- 
eral purposes of instruction, 
research, public service, 
academic support, student 
services, institutional sup- 
port and the 
operation/maintenance of 
facilities. 

Auxiliary Enterprise 
Funds are provided by stu- 
dent fees for the operation 
and maintenance of auxil- 
iary facilities. Auxiliary 
facilities include housing, 
dining, Gemmel Student 
Complex and the recreation 
center. 

Restricted funds are 
from grants and contracts 
that are restricted for a spe- 
cific purpose by the grantor 
or awarding agency. An 
example of restricted funds 
is financial aid. 

Plant funds are those 



that will be used for the 
acquisition of capital assets, 
major facility and infra- 
structure renovations and 
debt retirement. 

Two other parts of the 
budget are deficit reduction 
and undesignated carry for- 
ward. Deficit reduction is 
the money that needs to be 
paid off by making cuts in 
different places and raising 
prices of various things such 
as tuitions and fees. Carry 
forward is the surplus or 
extra money that the uni- 
versity has each year. Both 
of these are determined at 
the end of the fiscal year. 
Last year, Clarion had an 
undesignated carry forward 
of $1.1 million and a deficit 
reduction of $1 million. 

By the end of the 2008 
fiscal year the university 
hopes to have the deficit 
paid off and have about the 
same or more carry forward 
than last year. If this gets 
accomplished, Clarion 



would have a balanced 
budget. 

Bylaska said, "Our bal- 
anced budget is due to tough 
decisions and a lot of hard 
work by many people at 
Clarion University." 

There are many ways 
that the University will 
attempt to balance their 
budget. 

First, the Board of 
Governors approved a 2.75 
percent tuition rate increase 
for all students, and they 
increased performance 
funding by 3.5 percent. 

The State Appropriation 
to PASSHE will give Clarion 
a .7 percent increase. Also 
the budget for interest 
income will increase by 
approximately 42 perfect 
based on the prior years 
actual revenue received. 



See "BALANCED" 
continued on page 2. 



CUP to Implement new emergency communication system 



Donald Baum 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_cJwbaum®clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 26- 
Clarion University is one of 
many campuses that has 
armed officers and will now 
be implementing a text mes- 
sage warning system. 

Following the April 16, 
2006 shooting incident at 
Virginia Tech University, 
concerns about student safe- 
ty have been raised and con- 
tinue to be a top issue on 
university campuses across 
the nation. 

Safety issues ranging 
from arming campus police 
to implementing text mes- 
sage warning systems are 
currently issues of debate. 

A number of schools con- 
tinue to argue over the 
necessity of allowing cam- 
pus police officers to carry 
weapons, although the 



debate is not new. 

In 1978, Penn State 
University became the first 
University in the 

Commonwealth to be 
authorized to allow campus 
police officers to carry 
firearms. 

Due to the approval of 
House Bill 509 by the 
Pennsylvania State Senate 
on October 24, 2005, 14 of 
Pennsylvania's State 

System of Higher Education 
Schools, including Clarion 
University and Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 
(lUP), have campus police 
officers that are authorized 
to carry firearms. 

In addition, lUP has ini- 
tiated a new "Special 
Emergency Communication 
Program" that works to con- 
nect university staff, stu- 
dents and parents, as well 
as the larger community. 

The "Special Emergency 
Communication System" 



purchased by lUP, through 
Reverse 911, is designed to 
warn students in the event 
of an emergency, such as the 
Virginia Tech shooting, as 
quickly and effectively as 
possible. 

"We have an extensive 
disaster and emergency 
plan in place, and we contin- 
ue to work to update it and 
to test it so that it can be 
employed quickly if it is 
needed," said Michelle 
Fryling, lUP's Director of 
Media Relations. "Safety 
and security is priority one 
for all of us, and while we 
hope that we never have to 
use the Reverse 911 emer- 
gency notification system, 
we feel its an important ini- 
tiative in our continued and 
diligent efforts to keep our 
campus as safe as possible." 

See "SAFETY" 
continued on page 2. 




Frank Remm/ck, a Public Safety officer at Clarior) L/n/Vers/ty, is one of the officers that is 
authorized to carry firearms. (The Clarion Call/Sean Montgomery) 



Admissions Office deems f resiiman class largest in recent years 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmrichard@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 24 - 
Clarion University has 
enrolled one of the largest 
classes of incoming fresh- 
men to date. 

With a total of 1,438 
first time students, the 
Clarion University Office of 
Admissions believes that 
this is one of the largest 
incoming classes in Clarion 
University history. Clarion 
University Dean of 
Enrollment and 

Management William 

Bailey said he feels that the 
university efforts have been 
a crucial part of achieving 
such a high number of 
incoming freshmen. 

"All aspects of the uni- 
versity focus on recruiting 
students. It's really been a 
university effort to recruit 
students, more so than in 
previous years. A lot of 
thanks are due to the facul- 




Clarion University boasts a total of 1,438 freshman students for the fall 2007 semester, rounding 
out 6, 759 total students enrolled. (The Clarion Call/Jessica Lasher). 



ty and students," says 
Bailey. "We strive to provide 
personal attention and com- 
munication to both students 



and families. We work hard 
at it every year to do it bet- 
ter and more effectively 
than other universities." 



Many freshmen have 
responded well to this effort 
and feel that Clarion 
University offered them the 



programs they wanted, as 
well as presenting them in 
an effective manner. 

"I was looking for good 
schools for education," said 
Ryan Lacovey, a freshmen 
secondary education social 
studies major. "It came 
down to Clarion and 
Slippery Rock and I chose 
Clarion because [when I 
went to visit] it was present- 
ed better and better organ- 
ized. It seemed like a much 
better school for me." 

Similar to Lacovey, 
other students said they felt 
that Clarion University had 
a great deal to offer. 

"I really liked the cam- 
pus," said freshman second- 
ary education math and 
English major Rebecca 
Hoffman. "I really liked the 
honors and music pro- 
grams." 

Generally speaking, 
freshmen seemed to enjoy 
the benefits that a state 
school can provide, such as 
more affordable tuition. 



"I chose Clarion because 
it was relatively inexpensive 
and had the courses that I 
wanted," said Rebecca 
Szymborski, a freshman 
theatre major. "It was also 
close enough for me to visit 
my family, but also far away 
enough for me to retain my 
independence." 

For some incoming 
freshmen, though, distance 
was not an issue. 

Alex Reifsnyder, a fresh- 
men library science major, 
must make a four and a half 
hour drive to and from 
Clarion. As a resident of 
Reading, Pa., Reifsnyder 
feels that Clarion is worth 
the long road trip. 

"It had the best library 
science program that I knew 
of and the campus is very 
nice and peaceful," said 
Reifsnyder. 

See 

"ENROLLMENT" 
continued on page 2. 



Page 10 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 20. 2007 





Abgar speaks out 
about hazing 



J 




Check out the 
upcoming events 
for October 




CUP tennis takes 
second 



One copy free 



THECL 




I CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 94 Issue 3 



September 27, 2007 



CUP budget to be balanced by end of 2008 fiscal year 



CLARION UNIVERSITY BUDGET 1998-2007 







Undmmnatcd 
Fund«d by rtsarvtf 
D«ftc(t R«ducl>oo 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ieerickson®clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Sept. 24 - The 
Council of Trustees 
announced a plan that will 
make Clarion University's 
budget balanced by the end 
of the 2008 fiscal year. The 
fiscal year begins on July 1 



and ends on June 30 of the 
following year. 

In the past, Clarion 
University has not been 
close to having a balanced 
budget, according to Paul 
Bylaska, the Vice President 
for Finance and 

Administration. 

Bylaska said, "I have 
been here for 20 vears and 



the budget hasn't been bal- 
anced for at least that long." 

When it comes to a col- 
lege's budget there are 
many parts and compo- 
nents. 

There are four major 
funds, Educational and 
General Funds, Auxiliary 
Enterprise Funds. 

Restricted Funds and Plant 



Funds. 

Educational & General 
Funds are from unrestricted 
sources such as tuition, fees 
and state appropriation that 
have been provided for gen- 
eral purposes of instruction, 
research, public service, 
academic support, student 
services, institutional sup- 
port and the 
operation/maintenance of 
facilities. 

Auxiliary Enterprise 
Funds are provided by stu- 
dent fees for the operation 
and maintenance of auxil- 
iary facilities. Auxiliary 
facilities include housing, 
dining, Gemmel Student 
Complex and the recreation 
center. 

Restricted funds are 
from grants and contracts 
that are restricted for a spe- 
cific purpose by the grantor 
or awarding agency An 
example of restricted funds 
is financial aid. 

Plant funds are those 



that will be used for the 
acquisition of capital assets, 
major facility and infra- 
structure renovations and 
debt retirement. 

Two other parts of the 
budget are deficit reduction 
and undesignated carry for- 
ward. Deficit reduction is 
the money that needs to be 
paid off by making cuts in 
different places and raising 
prices of various things such 
as tuitions and fees. Carry 
forward is the surplus or 
extra money that the uni- 
versity has each year. Both 
of these are determined at 
the end of the fiscal year. 
Last year. Clarion had an 
undesignated carry forward 
of $L1 million and a deficit 
reduction of $1 million. 

By the end of the 2008 
fiscal year the university 
hopes to have the deficit 
paid off and have about the 
same or more carry forward 
than last year. If this gets 
accomplished. Clarion 



would have a balanced 
budget. 

Bylaska said, "Our bal- 
anced budget is due to tough 
decisions and a lot of hard 
work by many people at 
Clarion University." 

There are many ways 
that the University will 
attempt to balance their 
budget. 

First, the Board of 
Governors approved a 2.75 
percent tuition rate increase 
for all students, and they 
increased performance 
funding by 3.5 percent. 

The State Appropriation 
to PASSHE will give Clarion 
a .7 percent increase. Also 
the budget for interest 
income will increase by 
approximately 42 perfect 
based on the prior years 
actual revenue received. 



See "BALANCED" 
continued on page 2. 



CUP to implement new emergency communication system 



Donald Baum 
Ciarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dwbaum@clanon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 26- 
Clarion University is one of 
many campuses that has 
armed officers and will now 
be implementing a text mes- 
sage warning system. 

Following the April 16. 
2006 shooting incident at 
Virginia Tech University, 
concerns about student safe- 
ty have been raised and con- 
tinue to be a top issue on 
university campuses across 
the nation. 

Safety issues ranging 
from arming campus police 
to implementing text mes- 
sage warning systems are 
currently issues of debate. 

A number of schools con- 
tinue to argue over the 
necessity of allowing cam- 
pus police officers to carry 
weapons, although the 



debate is not new. 

In 1978, Penn State 
University became the first 
University in the 

Commonwealth to be 
authorized to allow campus 
police officers to carry 
firearms. 

Due to the approval of 
House Bill 509 by the 
Pennsylvania State Senate 
on October 24, 2005, 14 of 
Pennsylvania's State 

System of Higher Education 
Schools, including Clarion 
University and Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 
(lUP). have campus police 
officers that are authorized 
to carry firearms. 

In addition. lUP has ini- 
tiated a new "Special 
Emergency Communication 
Program" that works to con- 
nect university staff, stu- 
dents and parents, as well 
as the larger community. 

The "Special Emergency 
Communication Svstem" 



purchased by lUP. through 
Reverse 911, is designed to 
warn students in the event 
of an emergency, such as the 
Virginia Tech shooting, as 
quickly and effectively as 
possible. 

"We have an extensive 
disaster and emergency 
plan in place, and we contin- 
ue to work to update it and 
to test it so that it can be 
employed quickly if it is 
needed," said Michelle 
Fryling, lUP's Director of 
Media Relations. "Safety 
and security is priority one 
for all of us, and while we 
hope that we never have to 
use the Reverse 911 emer- 
gency notification system, 
we feel its an important ini- 
tiative in our continued and 
diligent efforts to keep our 
campus as safe as possible." 

See "SAFETY" 
continued on page 2. 




Frank Remmick, a Public Safety officer at Ctarior) University, is one of the officers tl^iat is 
authorized to carry firearms. (The Clarion Call/Sean Montgomery) 



Admissions Office deems f resliman class iargest in recent years 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmrichard@clanon.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 24 - 
Clarion University has 
enrolled one of the largest 
classes of incoming fresh- 
men to date. 

With a total of 1.438 
first time students, the 
Clarion University Office of 
Admissions believes that 
this is one of the largest 
incoming classes in Clarion 
University history. Clarion 
University Dean of 
Enrollment and 

Management William 

Bailey said he feels that the 
university efforts have been 
a crucial part of achieving 
such a high number of 
incoming freshmen. 

"All aspects of the uni- 
versity focus on recruiting 
students. It's really been a 
university effort to recruit 
students, more so than in 
previous years. A lot of 
thanks are due to the facul- 




Clanon University boasts a total of 1,438 freshman students for the fall 2007 semester, rounding 
out 6, 759 total students enrolled. (The Clarion Call/Jessica Lasher). 

ty and students," says and families. We work hard Many freshmen have 

Bailey. "We strive to provide at it every year to do it bet- responded well to this effort 

personal attention and com- ter and more effectively and feel that Clarion 

munication to both students than other universities." Universitv offered them the 



programs they wanted, as 
well as presenting them in 
an effective manner. 

"I was looking for good 
schools for education." said 
Ryan Lacovey. a freshmen 
secondary education social 
studies major. "It came 
down to Clarion and 
Slippery Rock and I chose 
Clarion because Iwhen I 
went to visit] it was present- 
ed better and better organ- 
ized. It seemed like a much 
better school for me." 

Similar to Lacovey, 
other students said they felt 
that Clarion University had 
a great deal to offer. 

"I really liked the cam- 
pus." said freshman second- 
ary education math and 
English major Rebecca 
Hoffman. "I really liked the 
honors and music pro- 
grams." 

Generally speaking, 
freshmen seemed to enjoy 
the benefits that a state 
school can provide, such as 
more affordable tuition. 



"I chose Clarion because 
it was relatively inexpensive 
and had the courses that I 
wanted." said Rebecca 
Szymborski, a freshman 
theatre major. "It was also 
close enough for me to visit 
my family, but also far away 
enough for me to retain my 
independence." 

For some incoming 
freshmen, though, distance 
was not an issue. 

Alex Reifsnyder. a fresh- 
men library science major, 
must make a four and a half 
hour drive to and from 
Clarion. As a resident of 
Reading. Pa.. Reifsnyder 
feels that Clarion is worth 
the long road trip. 

"It had the best library 
science program that I knew 
of and the campus is very 
nice and peaceful." said 
Reifsnyder. 

See 

"ENROLLMENT' 
continued on page 2. 



^MMMIHHHHMIMHn 



Page 2 



Tig CLARION CALL 



kws 

Senate discusses policy after late request 



September 27. 2007 



Page 3 



Tm CLABION CALL 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyori®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 24 - 
Student Senate met on 
Monday to discuss issues on 
campus and vote on the 
request made by the PoHtcal 
Economy Club. 

The Political Economy 
Club was making a request work with other students 
for $392 to send four of the There was a problem 

club's students to a confer- that needed to be consid- 
ence in Harrisburg. ered: the request was not 

The representatives for sent in until this past week . 
the Political Economy Club Student senate policy 



dents were all volunteers 
and had experience abroad. 
This event would allow the 
four students to see how 
programs at other schools 
function and would help 
improve the Clarion cam- 
pus's program. The three 
purposes for students to 
attend the conference would 
be to promote, learn what 
others are doing and net- 



be in two weeks time for 
consideration. However, as 
the representatives for the 
Political Economy Club 
explained, they were just 
informed that students 



vote was taken. 

The motion was passed 
11:9:1. The senate discuss 
ed the need to review the 
policy of the student senate 
and look into an emergency 



could attend the conference, policy for instances such as 

This put the Student Senate this, 

into a strong discussion. In other business, 

President Dustin Business Manager Lee 

McElhattan stressed, Krull said Family Day was a 

"Policy is policy and that's in large success and the second 

black and white, written." largest ever fmancially. 



McElhattan said. 

After the senators had a 
discussion about the policy 
and asked the representa- 
tive's for the Political 



The student athletic 
advisor committee stated 
that two representatives 
will be sent to a PSAC meet- 
ing Sunday 



explained that the four stu- requires that requests must Economy Club questions," a 

Request for tenure track applications announced 



Lacey Lichvar 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_lelichvar@clanon.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 24 - The 
Faculty Senate met on 
Monday in the Enid Dennis 
Room of Hart Chapel. 

The President's Report 
stated that the announce- 



New recruitment soft- Pfannestiel, said. "We have nate six faculty members 

ware has been finished, a sizable pool of applicants." with the final decision being 

According to assistant pro- In other business, new up to President 

fessor of modern languages program proposals are being Grunenwald 

and cultures, Dr. Elisabeth accepted by the CCPS. Sue Dr. Donato said the task 

Donato, this software will Traynor announced that the of CCR is to "Recruit mem- 
deadline for submissions are 



keep track of job searches 
for each department. It will 
also be used for the tenure 
track hiring process. 



ment that applications for Faculty members will be 
tenure track are being trained to use this software. 



requested. President 

Grunenwald will be working 
with the Dean of each 
department to make hiring 
decisions. 



due Oct. 1. The committee 
will review the submissions 
and vote by the end of the 
semester. 

The CCR is currently 



Final applications for calling for nominations in 

the Provost search were due the search for the Dean of 

on Sept. 21 and will be the College of Business 

reviewed, associate profes- Administration. The 

sor of history, Dr. Todd Faculty Senate will 



nomi- 



hers for all faculty senate 
committees and sub-com- 
mittees at the beginning of 
the year." 

Speaking on behalf of 
Venago campus, Dave Lott 
announced that there will 
be an advising week and 
Cultural Arts activities 
which are posted on the 
Venago Web site. 



"BALANCED" 
continued from front 
page. 

University employee 

salaries are supposed to 
increase by approximately 
4.7 percent due to the collec- 
tive bargaining agreement 
increases, but the increase 
will be lessened due to the 
reductions necessary to 
eliminate last year's deficit. 
Required employee contri- 
bution for employees 
enrolled in the State 
Employees Retirement 



System (SERS) has been 
increased by 1.55 percent. 
About 50 percent of 
Clarion's employees use this 
plan. 

Health insurance 

increases are changing too. 



plan increased 2.44 percent, 
and for those that use the 
PASSHE plans there was a 
decrease of 4.88 percent. 

Finally, the utility budg- 
et will get decreased by 
about 31.3 percent, and this 



For employees that use the is based on the expenditures 

PEBTF plan, there will be from last year. Also, 

an increase of 6.45 percent. Extended Programs is sup- 

For employees using the posed to increase its contri- 

PASSHE plan, there will bution to the General 

about a 2 percent increase. Operating Fund by approxi- 

Approximately 40 percent of mately $500,000 because 



the employees use the 
PEBTF plan. Also, annui- 
tant health insurance for 
retirees using the PEBTF 



there has been growth in 
distance learning and 
extended studies. 

Clarion University 



President Joseph 

Grunenwald said, "Because 
of the hard work and sacri- 
fice of all of our organiza- 
tional units, we have been 
able to accomplish a bal- 
anced budget at the begin- 
ning of the new academic 
year. This is critically 
important in assuring that 
academic and sujgjort units 
know in advance what 
resources they have for the 
year. Beyond this, we are 
now able to project future 
year budgets with much 
better confidence and accu- 
racy." 



"SAFETY" continued 
from front page. 

The system is voluntary and 
only requires students to 
register their cell phone 
number and non-university 



e-mail. Registering on the Pryiing. 

The issue of safety has 



lUP's Emergency Warning 
system is free to lUP stu- 
dents and their parents. 
The system includes text 
messaging to cell phones 
listed in the system, voice 
messaging and instant com- 
munication to digital signs 
on lUP campus. A verbal 
announcement to 39 blue 
light emergency telephones 
on campus is also part of 
lUP's new Emergency 
Communication System. 
"While no agency would 



ever want to say it's certain called "E2 Campus." 
in its ability to handle all Similar to the current 
disaster scenarios, we are system at lUP students and 
working diligently to be pre- staff will be able to sub- 
pared to keep our campus, scribe into the E2 Campus 
our students and employees system at no cost, 
as safe as possible to the 'The university is also 
best of our ability," said looking into modifying the 

campus phone system which 



been a first priority at 
Clarion University as well. 

"The safety of staff and 
students at the University, 
as well as visitors, is a para- 
mount concern for the uni- 
versity administration," 
said Tim Fogarty, interim 
administrator of the Public 
Safety Department. 

Clarion University is in 
the process of securing a 
text messaging alert system 



would allow for automatic 
voice mail messaging to 
individuals with campus 
based voice mail," said Tim 
Fogarty. 

Recent incidents on cam- 
pus within the borough, in 
which female students were 
approached by a stranger 
who attempted to grab them 
has helped to raise student 
concerns about safety. 



"Campus Police are 
present through out the 
campus via vehicle patrols, 
foot patrols and the bike 
patrol," said Fogarty. 

"Bike patrols being con- 
ducted by officers allow offi- 
cers to access areas of the 
campus that are generally 
only accessible by foot and 
provide the officers with the 
opportunity to respond to 
issues outside of the area in 
a more expedient manner," 
said Fogarty. "Students, 
staff and visitors need to 
keep in mind the advice that 
is provided regarding mov- 
ing about the campus dur- 
ing the evening and night." 



"ENROLLMENT" 
continued from front 
page. 

The biggest growth in the 
number of enrolled students 
is the graduate student 
level. Bailey attributes this 
to the amount of new pro- 
grams and offerings Clarion 
University has made avail- 
able to potential graduate 
students. Aside from offer- 
ing a wide variety of online 



in Pennsylvania have 
attained high numbers of 
incoming freshmen as well. 
Their results are as follows. 
Bloomsburg University: 
1,687; California University 
of Pennsylvania: 1,277; East 
Stroudsburg University: 
1,195; Kutztown University: 
1,^37; Lock Haven 
University: 1,160; 

Millersville University: 
1,331; Shippensburg 

University: 1,506 (first time 

courses. Clarion University ^""^ ^"" ^™® students only); 

also includes an MBA pro- ^''PP^^y Rock University: 




rmlovin'it 



gram and a library science 
program, all of which look 
very promising to future 
graduate students. 

Clarion, however, isn't 
the only state university to 
have achieved such high 
numbers of incoming stu- 
dents this year. 

Other state universities 



1,510 (first time and full 
time students only). 
Figures from Cheyney 
University, Edinboro 

University, Indiana 

University of Pennsylvania, 
Mansfield University, and 
West Chester University 
were unavailable at the 
time. 



Main Street McDonald s 
OCTOBERstudent 
special: Medium 
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Register to win a itee meal 5^ 
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7th A Main «*r^tf 



The Clarim Call provides a synopsis of aU cairn- 
inal investigations as conducted by Clarion 
University PubUc Safety for the month of 
September 2007. All information can be Accmmd 
m the Public Safety Web page, httpV/www.dari- 
on.edu/admin/publicsafety/location.shtmL 



■ Sept. 19, at 7:45 p.m., a female reported that an 
unknown male approached her at 9th Avenue and 
Wood St. and attempted conversation and then grabbed 
her wrist. The report is still under investigation. 

■ Sept. 15, at 12:20 p.m., Kyle Knisley, 19, of 
Hermitage, Pa., was cited for underage consumption of 
alcohol after he was found to be in posession of alcohol 
at Reinhard Villages. 

■ Sept. 15, at 2:50 a.m., Benjamin Barczyk, 19, of 
Bethel Park, Pa., was cited for underage consumption 
and public drunkenness after public safety was called 
to Ballentine Hall and found Barczyk intoxicated in the 
first floor garbage room. 

■ Sept. 13, at 10 p.m., a victim reported harassment 
by a known individual after that suspect pushed and 
spat on the victim at Reinhard Villages. 

■ Sept. 12, at 11:50 p.m., Joseph Luke, 19, of Altoona, 
Pa. was found to be intoxicated while in Givan Hall and 
was cited with underage consumption. 

■ Sept. 11, at 11:20 p.m., Jeremey Brown, 19, of 
Harrisburg, Pa., was found to be in posession of two 
bottles of malt liquor in Ballentine Hall. Brown was 
cited for underage posession. 



after a report of an intoxicated male wais made. TW 
individual was also in possession of prohibited weapons 
and cited for underage consumption and prohibited 
weapons. Charges will be filed. 

■ Sept. 8, at i:i6 a.m., Michael Deangelo, 20, of New 
Castle, Pa., was cited for underage consumption while 
at the 5500 block of Reinhard Villages. 

■ Sept. 8, at 12:23 a.m., a juvenile at Reinhard 
Villages was cited for underage consumption and pos- 
ession. 

■ Sept. 8, at 1:13 a.m., Kevin Smith, 18, of St. Mary's, 
Pa. was cited for underage consumption at Reinhard 
Villages. 

■ Sept. 8, at 12:57 a.m., Kara McCall, 20, of 
Rimersburg, Pa. was cited for underage consumption at 
5521 in Reinhard Villages. 

■ Sept. 8, at 1:02 a.m., John Kaufman, 19, of 
Emlenton, Pa was cited for underage consumption at 
Reinhard Villages. 

■ Sept. 7, at 1:15 a.m., the University Police assisted 
the Clarion Borough Police with serving Erika Hetzler, 
18, of Emlenton, Pa with an arrest warrant at MS 
p.m. at the Peirce Science Building for illegal use of 
drug prescriptions by a student. 




adsfiO 






* S-- - 




1064 A. Ia»t Main St. 
Clarion, PA 16214 

814-226'7S0O 



WIHI > ,> g tl gigtitjnft ..0tt 



Ifiiitt 



September 27. 2007 



The fate of the homerun ball 




graced the sport because he 
allegedly used steroids. I'm 
sure those are the same peo- 
ple who cast their vote to 
send the ball to the hall of 
fame with an asterisk. 

A bit hypocritical if you 
ask me. 

Do you realize by send- 



Eric Bowser 
Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser®clarlon.edu 



On September 15, fash- 
ion designer Mark Ecko 

bought Barry Bonds' 756*^ 
homerun ball in an online 
auction. Bonds, who now 
has 762 career homeruns, 
hit number 756 on Aug. 7, 
breaking Hank Aaron's all- 
time homerun record of 755 
Aaron's record stood for 33 
years. 

Ecko left the fate of the 
ball in the hands of the fans 
by putting the ball up for 
online vote. Fans had three 
choices: send the ball to the 
Baseball Hall of Fame in 
Cooperstown, Ny. with an 
asterisk on it, send the ball 
to Cooperstown without an 
asterisk, or blast the ball 
into space. 

Ecko announced that 
the ball would be sent to the 
hall of fame with an asterisk 
on it after being the most 
popular choice in the poll. 

Some people are critical 
of Bonds and say he has dis- 



We don't need to go and 

see a stupid asterisk on the 

ball to remember what hap- 
pens. Bonds has been the 

most controversial figure 

outside Michael Vick's hou.se 

all summer. We know what 

happened. If you hate Barry 

Bonds, you can look at the 

ing such a historic piece of ball, say that he did it with sling with players doctoring 

baseball history to the hall the "juice," and continue to the baseball, which hap- 

Hank Aaron 



of fame with that asterisk 
on it you are disgracing the 
game yourself? Every per- 
son who voted for that aster- 
isk to be put on the ball has 
disgraced the game of base- 
ball. If you hate Barry 
Bonds then blast the ball 
into space, get it out of 
sight. But if you are a base- 
ball fan and truly care about 
the integrity of the game, 
you should have let it go in 
clean. 

Instead, we take a 
record and a ball that many 
people feel is tainted and 
put a blemish on the ball. 
The homerun record is the 
most hallowed record in all 



view Hank Aaron as the 
homerun king. If you like 
Bonds or don't care one way 
or the other, you can view it 
for what it is, a piece of his- 
tory. 

In the NFL Brett Favre 
just tied Dan Marino's all- 
time record for touchdown 
passes just last Sunday and 
I'd be willing to bet the 
majority of America doesn't 
even know. Favre was 
admittedly addicted to 
painkillers early in his 
career, when he passes 
Marino are we going to put 
an asterisk on the football 
and ship it to the Pro 
Football Hall of Fame. I 



of sports. More people care think not, Canton probably 
about this record and know wouldn't disgrace them- 
who holds the record than selves and the game by put- 
any other record in sports. ting it on display. 

Maybe Bonds doesn't Like it or not cheating is 

deserve getting any prefer- a part of baseball, its woven 



pened in the World Series 
last year, take a bow Kenny 
Rogers. There have been 
corked bats, stolen signs, 
extra pine tar on bats and 
many more cheaters 
through the course of base- 
ball history. 

The pi-oblem is most of 
those have been brushed 
aside and said to be "part of 
the game." Except for Barry. 
It's always different with 
him. 

So here's to hoping that 
the hall of fame, contrary to 
what they've already said, 
won't take the ball and save 
the integrity of the game. 
I'm sure there are plenty of 
people out there who would 
love to go see Barry Bonds' 
record-breaking homerun 
ball. They may hate him. 
but that's a piece of history 
that hasn't been tainted by 



ential^ treatment. Maybe he into the fabric of the game. Bonds using steroids but by 



doesn't deserve his baseball 
to be put into the hall of 
fame. Regardless of what he 
deserves, the loyal fans of 
Major League Baseball and 
the history of the game of 
baseball deserve more than 
that. 



Always has been, always 
will be. 

Bonds, while evidence 
suggests he did take 
steroids, wasn't the only 
one. Many major leaguers 
have been caught taking 
steroids through drug test- 



some idiot, just as Bonds 
himself called Ecko, tainting 
the ball with an asterisk. 

The author is a senior mass 
media arts & journahsm 
major and Sports Editor of 
The Call. 



I A tasing grace... who Is next? 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

szhause§clarlon.edu 



Well those college hippie 
know it alls are at it again. 
This past week at the 
University of Florida, a stu- 
dent named Andrew Meyer 
was asking former presiden- 
tial candidate and 
Massachusetts Senator 
John Kerry about his failed 
presidential bid. The ques- 
tion, asked in front of a 
mostly student audience, 
involved the alleged disen- 
franchisement of black vot- 
ers in Florida, as well as 
voters who had votes count- 
ed backwards or thrown out 
in Ohio (as pointed out in 
Greg Palast's book "Armed 
Madhouse"). Meyer, while 
waving a copy of the book in 
the air, recommended it to 
Kerry. Kerry then said he 
owned and had read the 
book. Meyer then asked 
Kerry why he did not pursue 
the allegations brought 
forth in Armed Madhouse. 
Kerry's reaction was similar 
to that of a deer in the head- 
lights, much like his conces- 
sion speech a few years 
back. 

In Kerry's defense, the 
question was asked in a rel- 
atively conceited and sar- 
castic tone, which, if you've 
ever talked to one of those 
"2004 election was a fraud" 



societies like the Free 
Masons or the Cremation of 
Care ritual at Bohemian 
Grove, they have nothing to 
hide, they just prefer to 
keep to themselves. 

But apparently, no one 
in Florida got the word 
because that was enough 
out of Andrew Meyer for the 
time being, at least for the 
administration and campus 
security. His mic was cut, 
and all of a sudden, campus 
security played one of their 
greatest video hits, under 



the way of keggers and 
raves. You are only in col- 
lege for seven or eight years, 
so besides this column, halt 
all reading. It poisons the 
mind and if you read too 
much, and learn more than 
shapes and colors, you 
might start to figure out 
how bad the system actually 
is. Well then the only step 
left is questioning those in 
authority, and everyone who 
saw the tase video saw how 
well that turned out. So 
save yourself some brain 



heavy lyrical influence from cells to burn, stop reading 
Bruce Springsteen, entitled and watch more episodes of 



" Glory Tase". The one secu- 
rity guard had an amazing 
taser solo, but it was kind of 
hard to hear over the 
screams of Meyer. I wish 
that they had covered his 
face with duct tape first, or 
just gagged his mouth to 
make it easier to hear. But it 
was only a bootlegged copy 
anyways, maybe I'll get 



or 



Hogan 



The Bachelor 

Knows 

Best. 

College kids aren't the 
only ones who should be get- 
ting tased these days. There 
is a whole other demograph- 
ic being left out. As a matter 
of fact, I renounce my sup- 
port of tasing college kids 
for the time being. After 



lucky enough to see one of thinking about it, if I sup- 
their live shows someday, port the tasing of 
Nonetheless, Meyer got 



enough when someone 
brings into question the 
amount of beer, or number 
of shots that I drank the 
night before. I just cannot 
stand it when I work so hard 
to get belligerently drunk 
enough to end up praying to 
the porcelain god just to 
have someone say "You only 
had eleven shots in an hour, 
not sixteen." I have seen 
people fight to the death 
over such an allegation, let 
alone questioning military 
service. Perhaps if we had 
hooked Kerry up to some 
electricity we could have 
gotten a better result out of 
him than the same "woulda 
shoulda coulda" speech he 
has been giving for the last 
three years. 

But who else besides 
Kerry could we light up that 
really deserves it? Britney's 
out because she has done 
enough to herself as of late. 
O.J. seems like a pretty 



llfii'Jiil.lcllmliilJii'Eioriinill'JonYiiu 



ing. Something Bonds wa.s 
never caught doing. In tact, 
when Bonds was allegedly 
taking those steroids it was- 
n't even against MLB rules 
to take steroids because 
they didn't test for them. 

Along with steroids 
baseball is constantly tus- 



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good candidate, but he is 

tasing of college probably going to jail, so 

students, I won't have any we'll let him live out his last 

!!'?l.^i 5.u^° .''? ^^'' °"^ ^^!^ ^° "^^^ "^y ^ol"mn. free days in peace. Wait a 

g^ let's just forget about tas- minute, how about the peo- 

ing college students right pie who actually write sto- 

now and put it off until I ries about Britney and O.J.? 

graduate, then you're all on I like that idea quite a bit. 

your own. Back to the point, Why don't we just go across 

the country, gather up some 



and much to the satisfaction 
of the audience members 
(who were bored to tears 
with Kerry's speech any- 
ways) the electricity was... 
well... electrifying. 

It's always refreshing to 
see some yuppie knowit-all 
college scum get tased, 
reminds me of good ol' 
Communist Russia. Those 



were the davs. The only 

conspiracist types, then you thing missing in Florida is 

that It IS not too the snow that 



know 

uncommon. Meyer then 
went on a rant about Kerry's 
ties to George W. Bush and 
the Skull and Bones society 
at Yale. 

Everyone knows that 
the Skull and Bones is a 
peaceful organization for 
young men of modest means 
that promotes brotherhood 
and trust. It is just like any 
of those fun loving secret 



snow that Mother 
Russia once had, but thanks 
to Global Warming, we 
won't have to worry about 
that burden for too much 
longer. Thank God, winter is 
too depressing anyways. 
But we're living in a sink or 
swim world, so hopefully 
those polar bears learn to 
evolve quickk And hopeful- 
ly college kids stop doing so 
much reading, it's getting in 



who else should be tased? 

Well, at the top of the 
list is John Kerry, who 
should have been electrocut- 
ed on a daily basis back in 
2004. Does anyone actually 
remember watching Kerry 
speak after he reported for 
duty? It was like watching 
paint dry. 

Kerry definitely could 
have used a few volts to amp 
his personality a little bit, 
especially when he was lam- 
basted by the Swiftbush 
Veterans. He continued to 
say that he should not have 
to defend himself against 
such blatant slander against 
his military service. 
Personally, I get perturbed 



of the more temperamental 
campus security officers and 
sick them on all of the gos- 
sip columnists and 
paparazzi that write about 
all of that crap. In a world 
that has more than a third 
of its population living in 
poverty the last thing we 
need to read about is 
Britney Spears bombing on 
the VMAs, or Anna Nicole 
Smith's newborn signing a 
contract to pose nude for 
Hustler. I am not saying 
that these are national 
emergencies that we should 
overlook because I know 
that they are the only rea- 
son that I wake up in the 



morning. But I am saying 
that we could dedicate more 
than ten or fifteen minutes 
a day honoring soldiers 
serving overseas a little 
more, or campaigning on 
grassroots efforts to end the 
genocide in Darfur. 

Like George Carlin. 1 
feel like my ideas are a little 
bit ahead of my time, but 
this one just might work 
out. Just bare wath me as 
you read these last few sick 
sentences. Why don't we get 
a slew of voluntary celebri- 
ties, you know th(> really 
annoying liberal ones like 
Angelina .lolic, Sean Penn, 
or Tim Kohbins, (those 
bleeding hearts who actual- 
ly try to help people) and 
then vote .American Idol 
style on who we tase"? W'e 
can have try outs and a 
panel of judges (made up of 
conservatives because they 
like to -fc ]ii-(ip],. elecn-oeut- 
ed) and have tliem pick the 
top ten most tasable. Then 
every week, there is a high- 
er level of electricity that we 



set the taser to. Whoever 
has the best tase. as deemed 
by the American audience 
texting or calling their votes 
in, gets to stay on, and who- 
ever gets voted off has to 
move out of their mansion 
and take the place of one 
freedom fighter in their war 
torn country of choice. The 
winner gets (drum roll) not 
to be tased again! 

Then with all of the pro- 
ceeds from the show, we buy 
wheat, powdered milk, and 
other delicacies that we 
send to countries in need. 
Now we are well on our way 
to eliminating world hunger 
and Hollywood stars whose 
homes cost more than I, or 
you will make in eight life- 
times. So, can anyone think 
of some primetime conserva- 
tives to sit on the new num- 
ber one rated primetime 
reality show "Tasing with 
the Stars" panel? Why don't 
we start with Sean Hannity 
and go from there? 



Page 4 



Feitms 



ON CALL 



September 27. 2007 September 27. 2007 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 



Homecoming,' fourt. rock 
band and (Miotoshop; not 
often do all of these things 
pertain to one person. 
except in Mike Neclv's case. 
Neely. a junior majoring 
in psychology with a minor 
in sociology, i.s involved with 
countless activities on cam- 
pus. Neely is a member of 
the auditorium tech crew. 
the student manager at the 
information desk. a 
CampusFest chairperson 
and is a member of the 
Clarion Young Democrats. 

Neely grew up in 
Smethport. Pa. and gradu- 
ated from Smethpoi't -Junior 
Senior High School in 2001. 
While in high school, Neely 
was a member of student 
council, marching band, the 
golf team and the stage 



crew. He also enjoyed wood- 
shop and metal shop. 

When not in .school, 
Neely was a member of the 
Smethport Volunteer Fire 
Department. Neely is a 
Penn.syivaiua certified 
Emergency Medical 

Technician and firefighter. 
In his (rvv time, Neely 
enjoyed playing street hock- 
ey and was a member of a 
rock band named Frazzle. 

"For our senior project, 
we wrote our own songs and 
put on a mini concert for our 
senior class," said Neely. 
"Now that was a fun senior 
project." 

He decided to attend 
Clarion University while 
visiting his girlfriend. 

"I met some of the facul- 
ty members, and they told 
me that I would fit in per- 
fectly around campus," said 
Neely 

He also enjoyed the 
small town feel of Clarion 



and that it is close to home. 
"With my mother being 
disabled. I liked how close I 
could be to her," he said. 

During his time at 
Clarion, Neely has been a 
part of various events on 
campus. He has done tech- 
nical work at many of the 
University Activities 

Board's shows. He was the 
technical director of the 
Vagina Monologues and has 
been a chairperson of 
CampusFest for the past 
three years. 

There are many activi- 
ties and hobbies that Neely 
enjoys in his free time. Some 
include golf, poker, random 
road trips, college football, 
Photoshop and hanging out 
with his roommates. 

"My favorite thing to do 
in the summer time is dirt 
track racing," said Neely. 
"It's amazing." 

Neely is also a fan of col- 
lege and professional foot- 






school, business or even a 



ball and hockey ever meet." 

Tm not a Steelers fan, In the future, Neely prison, 

but I am a huge Dolphins hopes to receive his MBA "I just hope to make 

fan said Neely "I actually with a concentration in enough money to ma^ei 

met Dan Manno, he ts the administration. He hopes to through life 'he said 

nicest guy that you could be an administrator at a 



|#HH ^^ . ^^ ^ •' "" •'^"" ^""*" '^^ an aaministrator at a 

The Cuban Guy" encourages students to persevere 




Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nawatts@clarion.edu 



Andre "The Cuban Guy" Lara appeared Sept. 24 as part of the 
Martin Luther King, Jr Speaker Series. One of his motivators, Get 
Off Your Anatomy, encourages students to take action and 
achieve their goals. (The Clarion Call/Stefanie Jala) 



Andre "The Cuban Guy" 
Lara started off the Martin 
Luther King Jr. Speaker 
Series on Sept. 24 in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room. He gave a presenta- 
tion about staying motivat- 
ed at difficult times and how 
to move forward and achieve 
goals. 

At the age of 16, Lara 
escaped from Cuba to 
America with no money or 
the ability to speak English. 
By overcoming these obsta- 
cles, he was able to write 
several books, become CEO 
of A. Success Training and a 
nationally known speaker 



Speaker discourages hazing 



by the age of 24. 

Throughout the presen- 
tation, Lara used audience 
interaction to get the audi- 
ence motivated and excited. 
Using humor and having 
the audience complete a 
sentence gave an attentive 
and fun experience. Lara 
feels that people learn bet- 
ter when they interact and 
usually want to learn more 
from the experience. One of 
his motivators was the word 
GOYA, Get Off Your 
Anatomy to take action. 

"You don't have to be the 
person with the highest IQ, 
just have to GOYA," he said. 
He described that even 
though people want some- 
thing and would do any- 
thing to achieve it, only a 
small portion will actually 
take the action. This used a 



demonstration with a twen- 
ty dollar bill. Even though 
most of the audience raised 
their hands because they 
wanted the money only a 
few people took the action to 
grab it. 

When escaping from 
Cuba, there were harsh con- 
sequences. He recalled one 
experience, saying, "If you 
think moving forward is 
painful, try going back." 

"Things may not go as 
we planned," he said. 

He also explained that 
people hear negative words 
everyday and sometimes 
believe what they hear, but 
if they believe in the posi- 
tive things within ourselves, 
we can achieve and over- 
come difficult situations. 

After the presentation, 
Clarion students had the 



chance to receive free copies 
of Lara's book, "How to Stay 
Motivated during Difficult 
Times," which includes 
inspirational stories, tips on 
how to overcome obstacles 
and quotes from other moti- 
vational speakers. 

The Speaker Series is 
sponsored by The Martin 
Luther King Celebration 
Committee and Minority 
Student Services. Rogers J. 
Laugand III, committee co- 
chair, feels that there should 
not be one day to celebrate 
MLK achievements, but to 
do so through out the year. 
After the presentation, 
Laugand said, "(It was] awe- 
some, very inspirational. 
Everyone should have 
walked away with some- 
thing." 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nawatts@clarion.edu 



Travis Apgar, the Robert 
G. Engel Associate Dean of 
Students at Cornell 
University, was the guest 
speaker in recognition of 
National Hazing Prevention 
Week. The event was held 
Sept. 25 in the Gemmell 
Multi-Purpo.se Room and 
was ho.sted by the 
Interfraternity and 

Panhellenic Councils of 
Clarion University 

Apgar had expei'ienced 
hazing as a football player 
and pledging for his frater- 
nity Apgar is still a member 
of Tau Kappa P^psiJon. but 
has learned from this nega- 
tive experience. 

He discussed how the 
Greek life i.s portrayed in a 
funny way to the pul)lic. 
though films like -'Old 
School," which .set the nega- 
tive impression that hazing 
is part of the norm in frater- 
nities and sororities. 

Apgar defined hazing as 
participation in a group that 
humihates. degrades, abus- 
es or endangers them phvsj- 
cally or mentally regardless 
of the willingness to partici- 
pate. 

Hazing occurs because 
the notion of bonding, tradi- 
tion and rights of |),issa,ue. 
according to Apgar. People 
entering college want to fit 
in and have fun in their col- 
lege years. Joining ;i fi'ater- 
nity or sorority can he a 
source making friends nnd 
fitting in. Also, members are 
generally accepted and 



admired by the university 
making it more desirable. 
Apgar spoke about how haz- 
ing also occurs in high 
school athletics, the military 
and some .student organiza- 
tions. 

During high school, stu- 
dents think hazing is posi- 
tive and will make them a 
stronger person, even if it 
means enduring pain and 
humiliation to get there. 
Apgar then showed photos 
of men having bruises in 
result of paddling. 

Alcohol is often a large 
part of hazing. Members 
have to drink large quanti- 
ties to impress and prove 
themselves to the others. 
Apgar said that is some- 
times used to loosen people 
up and impair their judg- 
ment. This often results in 
negative situations and 
even death. 

"Hazing does hurt peo- 
ple." Apgar said. 

He mentioned that he 
joined a fraternity for the 
social scene and thought it 
was a good idea, but then 
pledging takes over his life. 
As 11 rt'sujt. he failed most of 
his classes and decided to 
drop-out before the universi- 
ty suspended him. 

For a few semesters he 
went to a community col- 
lege, then his love of football 
influenced him to transfer to 
.1 foui-year university. After 
he refused hazing events 
Irom his teammates, they 
begin to treat him negative- 
b- It made him realize he 
didn't want to be part of the 
team and quit. 

"We hear people sav ail 
the time it was their choice. 



they wanted to do it," Apgar 
said. 

He also said that hazing 
challenges people both phys- 
ically and mentally As a 
result of hazing, it can be 
hard to tell if a person has 
depression or went through 
a violent experience. 

"We don't know if they 
have been a victim of child 
abuse; we don't know if they 
are a victim of alcohol 
abuse," Apgar said. 

His calls this "hidden 
stress" because members 
don't know about a person's 
mental stress and often 
push a person to their men- 
tal limits. Apgar's close 
friend was harmed mentally 
by hazing and suffered from 
depression because of it. 

To prevent hazing, peo- 
ple need to understand what 
an organization stands for. 
He di.scussed values, cul- 
ture, scholarship and honor. 
He believes that doing team 
builder exercises will pre- 
vent organizations from 
doing hazing. Instead of try- 
ing to drink a gallon of alco- 
hol, members should consid- 
er trying to give community 
service hours. Challenging 
people and setting stan- 
dards will help make it a 
positive environment. 

"People will take it seri- 
ously if we take it serious- 
ly," he said. 

To prevent fraternities 
and sororities from hazing. 
Apgar said there needs to be 
a strict policy and the col- 
lege needs to work with stu- 
dents to develop alterna- 
tives, like team builders. 
(Front page teaser photo 
courtesy of Newswire) I 



Families Join students for 
an array of Ciarion activities 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbanclzuh@clarion.edu 



On Sept. 22, Clarion 
University held its annual 
Family Day a tradition that 
originated in 1979. 

Family Day began with 
brunch, featuring music by 
the Clarion University 
Marching Band, and a wel- 
coming address by Clarion's 
President, Dr. Joseph 
Grunenwald. 

Following the brunch, 
the Parent Council held 
their meeting in Chandler 
Dining Hall. 

"Family Day is a good 
opportunity for parents to 
feel reassured with their 
decision to send their chil- 
dren to Clarion," said Sam 
Noblit, a senior mass media 
arts, journalism and com- 
munication studies and 
business major. 

Recognized Student 
Organizations sponsored 
tables that were set up out- 
side of the Gemmell Student 
Complex for family activi- 
ties. There were also inflata- 
hies and music from WCUC 
91.7 FM. Ix)cated inside the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room was comedy/magician 
Tim Piccirillo, a Clarion 
University alumnus. 

Zach Carroll, junior ele- 
mentary education major, 
said, "Family Day is a great 
way for the families to inter- 
act with each other. The 
inflatables even make the 
adults feel like kids again. It 



is a great experience." 

The evening activities 
switched from on campus to 
Memorial Stadium later in 
the day Prior to the football 
game, there was a lot going 
on. The band was preparing 
for their halftime show, the 
players were on the field 
going through their whole 
warm up routine, WCUB- 
TV was preparing for their 
broadcast and families were 
partaking in a picnic-style 
meal. 

"Family Day is a great 
opportunity for family mem- 
bers of all ages to enjoy 
Clarion University and see 
the campus again." said 



Jess Kline, a junior elemen- 
tary education major. 

Honored during half- 
time was the 1977 champi- 
onship football team for 
their 30th anniversary. 
Wrapping up this year's fes- 
tivities was a screening of 
the movie "Shrek the Third" 
in the Gemmell Multi- 
Purpose Room. 

"Family Day is a blast! 
It is nice to see all of the 
families come out to spend a 
day with their children! Fly 
Eagles Fly!" said Ariel 
Weaver, a senior mass 
media arts, journalism and 
communication studies 
major. 




West Jones and Angela Knotts stand with West and Elijah in front 
of one of the inflatables at Family Day It allowed people to fight 
with large boxing gloves. (The Clarion Call/Jessica Lasher) 



im 



[OH CALL 



tiUrtiimtt 



Pages 



Tliere is sometliing for everyone in tiie montii of October 




Amber Stockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

8_alstockhoiaclarion.edu 



How long do you think it 
would take to create a beau- 
tiful painting? Well for 
Adam "Atom" Geld, you only 
need 5 minutes, a can of 
spray paint and a knife. 

That's right Atom has 
been creating science fiction 
pieces for years with just 
those three things, and he's 
coming to campus to prove 
it. 

On October 11 from 6-10 
p.m. in the Gemmell Multi- 
Purpose Room, the 
University Activities Board 
will welcome Atom as he 
shows us how he creates his 
masterpieces. Atom will be 
creating roughly 40 pieces 
right in front of the students 
and will even be giving some 
of these fascinating paint- 
ings to the audience. 

Years ago Atom began 
creating paintings only 
using spray paint in Mexico, 
from there he took off to 
begin traveling the world 



and creating his paintings. 
Atom has been putting his 
show on all across the 
United States and other 
countries, leaving crowds 
stunned. Known as "the 
world's fastest painter," 
Atom can construct a paint- 
ing in just three minutes. 
Don't believe it? Then make 
sure to attend the free show 
and be ready to be shocked. 
On Oct. 1 at 6:30 p.m., 
the 13th annual Clarion 
University and Community 
Cultural Nights begin. The 
event is scheduled to take 
place from Oct. 1 to Oct. 5, 
President Jospeh 

Gruenwald will open the 
event with a welcome 
speech. 

Numerous different per- 
formances are scheduled for 
each night including Jill 
West and Blues Attack, 
Spirit on the Hill, 
Resonance Percussion, 
Eugene and the 

Nightcrawlers and Johnny 
Oaks, the One Man, Big 
Band Sound. 

The Autumn Leaf 
Festival (A.L.F) Pep Rally 




is scheduled to be held Oct. 
4 at 7 p.m. in the Tippin 
Gymnasium. 

At the pep rally the 
band will perform, all fall 
sports teams will be intro- 
duced and the crowning of 
the Homecoming King and 
Queen will take place. 

Shortly thereafter, on 
Oct. 6 is the A.L.F parade. 
The parade takes place on 
Main Street and begins at 
12 p.m. Many different 
organizations on campus 
have created floats in order 
to participate in the parade 



On Tuesday Oct. 9, Pro- 
Life feminist speaker 
Dierdre McQuade will be 
speaking at 7:30 p.m. in 
Hart Chapel. 

The program is entitled 
"Roe Reality Check: Taking 
a Second Look at Abortion." 
A question and answer ses- 
sion will follow the presen- 
tation. 

McQuade has a masters 
degree from the University 
of Notre Dame in philoso- 
phy and theology and is the 
director of planning and 
information for the Pro-Life 



Senior art exhibit on 
dispiay in IHarwidc-Boyd 



Secretariat of the United 
States Conference of 
Catholic Bishops (USCCB). 
What else is in store for 
Clarion during the month of 
October? The UAB monthly 
craft series for October has 
been deemed "pumpkin 
painting." They will be pro- 
viding free pumpkins and 
paints to students on 
October 22 from 8-10 p.m. in 
the Gemmell MPR for stu- 
dents to create and decorate 
their own pumpkins. Also, a 
free Haunted House will be 
open to students Saturday 
Oct. 27 from 6-11 p.m. in the 
Gemmell MPR. 

The Army ROTC will be 
sponsoring their first annu- 
al Gladiator Obstacle 
Course on Oct. 4 at the Still 
Rugby Field. 

Teams of two can com- 
pete in events such as a 30- 
foot rock wall climb, a relay 
race, long and short range 
football toss, water jug 
relay mental agility excer- 
cise and paintball. 

Wrapping up the month 
of October will be a perform- 
ance by the group Recycled 



Percussion. This show is 
similar to the famous 
"Stomp" display. It is a 
musical performance done 
with garbage cans and other 
everyday articles from the 
street. This, 4-piece group 
uses industrial drumming, 
metal grinding guitar and a 
hip/hop DJ to create their 
unique sound. 

Their newest 18 month- 
long tour named "Man vs. 
Machine" began in Mid- 
August, and will make their 
way to Clarion University 
Oct. 29. The show visited 
Clarion University last year 
and due to popular demand 
will be revisiting this year. 
Recycled Percussion will be 
performing in the MPR at 
7:30 p.m.. so be sure to 
check it out and see how 
music is made, the not so 
ordinary way. 

There seems to be some- 
thing for everyone in 
October, so be sure to get 
out and enjoy the variety of 
fall festivities that are 
offered. For more informa- 
tion on these events, check 
out the university calendar. 



Welcome to California, Doctor 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers@clarion.edu 

The streets of 
Pittsburgh, Clarion and 
DuBois can be seen adorn- 
ing the walls in room 108 of 
Marwick-Boyd for senior 
Seth McClaine's art exhibit. 
The exhibit, called "Out 
in the Open: An Exhibition 
of Streetscape Paintings," is 
a collections of paintings 
displaying different scenes 
of empty streets in the three 
locations in Pa. From a 
snowy portion of the Clarion 
University campus to 
Pittsburgh's Fifth Avenue to 
a dark pathway under bush- 
es, the paintings show a 
serene combination of 
nature and man-made 
objects. 

"I chose to do landscapes 
because I just really enjoy 
them," said McClaine of his 
work. 

A reoccurring theme 
throughout the exhibit is 
the lack of people. McClaine 
left human Hfe out of the 
paintings because he felt 
that people could distract 
from the aspects of nature 
he was portraying. 

The locations he chose 
were based on what was 
familiar in his life. He is a 
Clarion native and he hopes 




Senior Seth McClaine's art exhibit is on display in room 108 of 
Marwick-Boyd. (The Clarion Call/Adam Huff) 



to live in Pittsburgh some- 
day 

McClaine based each of 
his paintings on photo- 
graphs he had taken. He 
also hopes to take more 
night photographs of 
Pittsburgh in the future. 



summer. 

McClaine was aided in 
this project, which is 
required for all level five art 
students, by professors Jim 
Rose and Melisa Kuntz. 

"I hope viewers experi- 
ence a peaceful, calming 



Robert Lloyd 
Los Angeles Times 

But new beginnings can 
be difficult; there are prob- 
lems here, though they are 
not irremediable. By and 
large the show improves on 
its pilot, which was sneaked 
last season into an episode 
of "Grey's Anatomy" as 
Addison visited old friend 
and fertility specialist 
Naomi (played then by 
Merrin Dungey, now by 
Audra McDonald) in hopes 
of getting pregnant. 

Actors can flow from 
role to role usually without 
troubling our sense of who 
they are, but characters are 
less flexible, more fragile. 
The audience knows them 
intimately; it can smell 
inconsistency (And will blog 
about it too.) One reason 
why "Grey's Anatomy" itself 
can be so exasperating is 
that the doctors of Seattle 
Grace are continually forced 
into unlikely new relation- 
ships to keep things novel ; 
the actors must spin and re- 
spin their characters to 
accommodate the latest 
interpersonal plot twist. It's 
crucial that we can see the 



Addison we already know in 
the Addison we meet anew. 
"Private Practice" 

begins at the disadvantage 
of any spin off - that we 
have something possibly 
better to compare it with - 
and with the particular dis- 
advantage of having already 
enshrined its early missteps 
within the "Grey's" canon. 
Last season's stealth pilot 
was both half-formed and 
too insistent, overly thick 
with exposition and 
pheromones; it threw 
Addison into a precipitous 
clinch with Pete the alterna- 
tive medicine practitioner 
(Tim Daly) even as Walsh's 
natural, comic chemistry is 
with Taye Diggs, as 
internist-author Sam. 

And its representation 
of Southern California 
seemed crafted by people 
who had never actually been 
here, a tourist version of 
local medicine and mores. In 
contrast to "Grey's 
Anatomy," which makes 
exhaustion glamorous, 
"Private Practice" is all soft 
focus, almost too insistent 
on its prettiness. 

Of course, they are dif- 
ferent animals: Where 
"Grey's Anatomy" is a 



drama with lashings of com- 
edy "Private Practice" is a 
comedy with dramatic inter- 
ludes. Indeed, it would take 
only the slightest bit of sur- 
gery to turn it into a work- 
place sitcom . You'd have to 
downplay the medical 
crises, but the characters 
could remain as described - 
the pediatrician (Paul 
Adelstein) fond of kinky sex 
with strangers, the psychol- 
ogist (Amy Brenneman) who 
stalks her ex-boyfriend, the 
surfer dude receptionist 
(Chris Lowell) who wants to 
be a midwife. And you could 
keep the dialogue mostly 
intact, as well. 

As actually produced, 
the tonal shift is more sub- 
tle than that. But it still 
requires Walsh to use her 
voice and face and body in a 
different way than she did 
on "Grey's Anatomy" and at 
times it feels slightly off - 
hke when your girlfriend 
comes home drunk or your 
husband starts singing to 
you for the first time in 20 
years of marriage. At first 
you may feel that you're 
looking at a stranger, but it 
doesn't mean you can't get 
used to it - or even come to 
prefer the stranger. 



Each of the paintings feeling when they look at 

took about a week to com- them," said McClaine. 
plete. Some of the paintings The exhibit is free and 

were done last fall, however, open to the public, 
most were completed this 

CUP professor to perform 
soio rec ital on Friday 



Site's a 21st century cyborg 



Rachella Vollant-Barle 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ravollantb@clarion.edu 

Amy Kaylor 
Business Manager 

s_amkaylor@clarion.edu 

On Sept. 28, Dr. Paula 
Amrod will be hosting a solo 
recital in Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. The recital will 



Doctor of Music degree in because it is a Solo recital. 
Piano Pedagogy and Amrod will feature solo 



Literature from Indiana 
University (Bloomington, 
IN). She has played fre- 
quently as a soloist and 
chamber performer on 
Clarion Campus and else- 



piano works by Handel, 
Beethoven, Brahms, 

Rachmaninoff and Villa 
Lobos. Amrod wishes that 
the "audience enjoys (the) 
program and hopes music 



Society. 

Amrod has been teach- 
ing at Clarion since 1981 



begin at 8 p.m. and is free to and is a professor of Piano 

the public. and Piano class. She said 

Amrod got her Bachelor she enjoys "exposing stu- 

and Master of Music dents to music that they are 

degrees in Piano unfamiliar with." 

Performance from the This recital differs from 

University of Memphis: a other departmental concerts 



where, including a recital in students are inspired to per 
Pittsburgh for the Steinway form." 

This is the only recital of 
the year that Amrod will 
perform in, however the 
music department will 
showcase senior recitals, 
and both instrumental and 
vocal performances 

throughout the year. 



Mary McNamara 
Los Angeles Times 

I miss Oscar. There, I've 
said it. With his funky avia- 
tor specs and his now politi- 
cally incorrect use of the 
word "babe," there is no way 
Oscar Goldman could have 
made the 30-year leap from 
"The Bionic Woman" to 
NBC's great new noir 
remake "Bionic Woman." (So 
sleek and hip it doesn't need 
a "the.") As played by 
Richard Anderson, Oscar 
lent a paternal heart to that 
'70s show - Lindsay 
Wagner's Jaime Sommers 
may have been able to lift 
automobiles with one hand, 
but she always had someone 
looking out for her. Babe. 

Michelle Ryan's updated 
Jaime has no such luck. In 
fact, she has no luck at all. A 
vaguely dissatisfied bar- 
tender caring for a sulky 



teen sister, she gets knocked 
up by her hot shot professor 
boyfriend. Will, just as he is 
about to leave for a new gig 
in Paris. And that's the good 
news. The bad news comes 
quickly in the shape of a 
horrific traffic accident that 
leaves Jaime short a few 
limbs. 

Fortunately Will (Chris 
Bowers) turns out to be part 
of a special ops prosthetic 
program. In other words, he 
has the technology; he can 
rebuild her - secretly, 
underground, with the help 
of some unnamed agency for 
no doubt nefarious military 
purpose in a procedure with 
previously mixed results. 
We know the results were 
mixed because the show 
opens with a trail of maimed 
corpses leading to a very 
attractive blond who is 
apparently responsible for 
them. "I'm not in control," 
she says before flying, teeth 



bared, at her trackers. 

So don't expect Max, the 
bionic dog, to show up any 
time soon. 

Dark in mood and tone - 
on a flat screen, the show is 
barely visible in direct sun- 
light - "Bionic Woman, " 
premiering Wednesday 
night, owes much to the pop- 
ularity of the graphic novel, 
the noir sci-fi sensibilities of 
Phdip K. Dick and perhaps 
Angelina Jolie. None of 
which is a bad thing. This is 
the post-feminist, post-Sept. 
11 bionic woman -- not only 
doesn't she need any help, 
she wouldn't trust it if it 
were offered. But that won't 
keep her from getting the 
job done. 

In other words, it's not 
your mother's "Bionic 
Woman." It's much, much 
better. 

See "CYBORG" on 
page 6. 



Page 6 



HiHB 



Tlffi CLAIUON CALL 



''Star Wars" makes its way 
into two cartoon favorites 



September 27, 2007 



Local artists featured on new album 



Joey Pettine 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

5jmpettine®clarion.edu 




"Robot Chicken 'Star 
Wars' Special" 
Creator: Seth Green 
Rating: 5/5 

♦ ♦#»♦♦ 

"Family Guy 'Star Wars' 
Special" 

Creator: Seth McFarlane 
Rating: 4.5/5 

♦ ♦♦♦* 



A long time ago, in the 
1970s, the name George 
Lucas graced theatre 
screens internationally. It 
would soon become a house- 
hold name, but at that time 
it was nothing. The movie it 
was pasted on was what 
mattered. That movie was 
"Star Wars," technically 
"Star Wars Episode IV A 
New Hope." However, at 
that time no one had any 
idea there were going to be 
two awesome sequels and 
then a trilogy of prequels 
that would let us all down so 
they just called it "Star 
Wars." 



"Star Wars" changed the 
way films were made. Not 
only did it give us Harrison 
Ford, but it also paved the 
■ way for the future of movies 
with what was, at that time, 
the most state-of-the-art 
effects. Without "Star 
Wars," there wouldn't be 
"Terminator 2," "Jurassic 
Park" or The Matrix." all 
milestone movies with the 
special effects today's socie- 
ty takes for granted. 

Without "Star Wars," we 
would have none of these. 
And there is one other thing 
we wouldn't have: "Star 
Wars" parodies. 

These parodies include 
everything from Tauntaun 
musical videos to the falsely 
biographical "George Lucas 
in Love," from "Star Wars 
Rap" to the "Darth Vader 
Psychic Hotline." Not to 
mention, the release of Seth 
Green's "Robot Chicken 
'Star Wars' Special" and 
Seth McFarlane's "Family 
Guy 'Star Wars' Special." 

Both of these satiric 
giants took on the "Star 
Wars" parody mere months 
apart. Since both of the 
Seth's work regularly 
appears on each other's 
shows, it makes you wonder 
if they didn't work on them 
together, and both were very 
strong with the force. 

If you weren't lucky 
enough to catch either spe- 
cial when they premiered on 
Cartoon Network or Fox, 
then I suggest either start 
scouring YouTube or begin 
watching cartoon Network's 
Adult Swim nightly and 
hope you get lucky because 
these parodies are just as 
worth it as the movie 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjdbuffone®clarion,edu 




"Spaceballs." 

First off we have the 
"Robot Chicken 'Star Wars' 
Special," which ran the 
gambit from "Star Wars" on 
ice to Boba Fett making out 
with Hans Solo frozen in 
carbonite, to Admiral 
Ackbar fish head cereal. 
And that's not even the tip 
of the Hothian iceberg, they 
do it all with action figure 
stop motion. I happily give 
their effort and comedic bril- 
liance five out of five leaves. 
Last Sunday, the sixth 
season of "Family Guy" pre- 
miered with their own "Star 
Wars" special. Instead of a 
slew of unrelated Monty 
Python-esque skits, they so 
far as to give us a full 
fledged lampoon of "A New 
Hope," fitting in Peter as 
Hans Solo, Stewie as Darth 
Vader, and it doesn't stop 
there. But what kind of a 
cartoon fan would I be if I 
ruined it? All I can say is the 
animated shot for shot 
''pproduction of original 
"Star Wars" scenes coupled 
with "Family Guy" genius 
makes it fantastic. While 
not as laugh out loud funny 
as the "Robot Chicken spe- 
cial, I still give it a 4.5 out of 
0. (Only because "Robot 
Chicken" made me laugh a 
little more.) 



"Spotlight" 
Drastically Classic 
Productions 
Rating: 3/5 

^^* ^(» ^^^ «®F mtm 



Drastically Classic 
Productions (DCP) has 
recently released its debut 
album, "Spotlight". The 
album is a collection of local 
Hip-Hop and R&B artists 
showcasing their talents. 
The majority of the perform- 
ers hail from Erie, Pa. and 
have a substantial amount 
of experience in the music 
business. 

The album features 
seven artists who are on the 
brink of making it big in the 
music industry. Rappers 
such as Novacane, Re, D. 
Joka and Missin' Link pro- 



vide most of the fast paced 
club beats like "Walk it like 
n Dog" and "Drop it," whcri'- 
as the slow jams such as 
"Point A" and "Should You" 
arc taken care of In the 
beautiful Tiah Blanks and 
Toy. 

The lyrics to all uf the 
songs are well written but 
would maybe have to ht- 
altered a hit to be radio eli- 
gible, hence the parental 
advisory sticker on the 
album cover. The artists 
sing with passion and it's 
obvious that they mean 
what they are singing. The 
executive producer of DCP, 
James Thigpen (J-Tiz), sup- 
plies all the sounds, beats 
and vocals in two songs. 

J-Tiz has been involved 
with music since a very 
young age. With idols such 
as Michael Jackson, J-Tiz 
was also inspired to dance 
as well as sing. After seeing 
his dancing skills outweigh 
his singing skills, he decided 
to focus solely on dancing. 
He was offered a four year 
scholarship after high 
school to dance in college 
but declined because his 
passion was producing 
music. After his life chang- 
ing decision, J-Tiz realized 
that producing music was 
the only thing he wanted to 
do in life. 
Thigpen started DCP in 




Page 7 



November of 2U()2 m hope of 
promoting local talents and 
of course to endor.Kf his own 
productions. UCP started off 
\>'iy small but eventually 
grew into a ver\ well man- 
aged compiiny and has 
remarkable musical talent 
to go along with it. With 
such commitment and pas- 
sion, DCP is destined to 
have an impact in the music 
industry. 

"Spotlight" has good 
sound with the right 
amount of varietx- to be con- 
sidered a quality album. I 
recommend this album to 
anyone who has a real 
appreciation for the Hip- 
Hop and R&B genre. The 
album is full of raw talent 
and rising stars and would 
be a great addition to any 
music buffs collection. If the 
talents of DCP continue to 
progress, 1 would expect big- 
ger and better things in the 
future from them. 



"CYBORG" continued 
from page 5. 



Lead singer of Thrice 
malces solo album 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.edu 




"Please Come Home" 
Dustin Kensrue 
Rating: 5/5 



First and foremost, to 
understand my obsession 
with Dustin Kensrue, one 
must first understand how 
he found his way into mv 
life. 

A few months ago, well 
actually it was approxi- 
mately Februarj-, I was rid- 
ing to Seven Springs with 
my best friend, Mindi, and 
we were doing our usual car 
■' ritual: dancing and singing 
to random songs. The partic- 
ular song that happened to 
be on was "Artist in the 
Ambulance" by Thrice. 

At this point, Mindi 
turns to me and says that 
the leader singer of Thrice, 
Kensrue, released a solo 
album and that it was 
amazing. She then proceed- 
ed to put it on so that I could 
hear it. 

The first song she 
played was entitled "Pistol." 
I was at first thinking that 
it was about a gun, and then 
I realized that it was in fact 
written about me. 



Now, I know what you 
are thinking, how can a 
famous performer write a 
song about a girl from Pa.? 
Well, technically he didn't, 
but this song may as well be 
the theme song of my life. 

The song is about how a 
guy feels about the girl in 
his life and how much she 
influences what he does. 
The word pistol is in fact 
explaining the girlfriend. 

"You're the girl of my 
dreams/ And a pistol it 
seems, but you shoot me 
straight and true." 

I watched a DVD of one 
of his performances and he 
talks about how he wrote 
the song for his wife, which 
was a real bummer for me. 

Towards the end of the 
song, he talks about how 
this girl is everything he 
needs in his life and actual- 
ly proposes to her 

Quite frankly, if "Pistol" 
was the only song that I 
ever heard on the album, I 
would still be absolutely in 
love with Kensrue. Well at 
least in love with him 
singing that song. 
Fortunately the rest of the 
album did not let me down. 
My other favorite song 
is "Before You Were 
Beautiful." I feel like this 
song has actual meaning to 
women everywhere. 

The song is about a 
woman who grew up "inno- 
cent and pure" and then 
changed because of the 
expectations of women in 
today's society. 

"The magazines and 
media supplied you with 
their plastic protocol/ And 
maybe music television real- 
ly is the devil after all/ But 
all I can say is I knew you 
before/ You were beautiful, 
back then/ Before you grew 




up, before you gave in." 

The song talks about 
how the woman desires love 
and affection, but instead of 
trying to find it she simply 
maintains physical relation- 
ships with all of the men 
that she meets. 

"And all you want is to 
hear the words/ 'Dear Baby, 
I love you'/ So you hike your 
skirt higher still/ 'Till their 
eyes are all on you." 

It also talks about how 
despite the fact that she is 
beautiful, she refuses to let 
anyone see the real her, 
even though she so desper- 
ately wants to. 

Another favorite song of 
mine on the album is 
"Please Come Home." 

"Please Come Home" is 
about a guy who takes 
money from his father and 
then leaves home to do his 
own thing. The father is 
devastated and would do 
anything to have his son 
back. 

Overall I would recom- 
mend this album to every- 
one. I think it is great and 
allows for a big change from 
the sound of Thrice. 

Don't get me wrong, I 
love everything about 
Thrice and a lot of other 
bands just like them, how- 
ever, every once in awhile 
it's nice to have a little bit of 
a change on my iPod. A little 
bit of a lighter change. 



With her big blue eyes 
and fair childlike face, 
Ryan, recently seen in 
"Jekyll," is perfect as an 
every woman upon whom 
kick-ass has been thrust. 
Previously adrift, Jaime 
now has no choice but to 
focus - if for no other reason 
than that the folks behind 
the bionics project are fairly 
cavalier about her well- 
being. "If it doesn't work 
out," says lead project 
meanie Jonas (the always 
welcome Miguel Ferrer), 
"we can always terminate." 
It's no longer Steve 
Austin's America, after all. 
Like any good sci-fi tale, 
"Bionic" reflects the fears 
and longings of the present, 
and as we have been told 
often in other contexts, the 
current mood of the country 
is something other than 
optimistic. Here, those anxi- 
eties are boiled down to a 
modern arms, and legs, 
race. The world is much fur- 
ther ahead technologically 



than it wants to admit, Will 
tells Jaime. The only ques- 
tion is who controls the 
goodies, and to what end. 

Will's father, for 
instance, would like to have 
a say since he apparently 
invented a lot of the pro- 
grams that have turned 
Jaime into an unwitting 
super soldier. Only he's kind 
of crazy, locked up in an 
underground prison facility. 
That is until a bad guy with 
a grudge breaks him out, 
taking him to a mountain 
top stronghold and ... well, 
you see where this is going. 
If Wagner's Jaime 
Sommers was a gee-whiz, 
lookie- here portrait of what 
the mind can do with a few 
wires and a computer chip, 
Ryan's is a much more wise 
and wary archetype. In the 
last 30 years, our attitude 
toward technology and life 
in general, has become a bit 
more cautious, a bit more 
overwhelmed. So Jaime is a 
symbol of her times, an 
embodiment not only of the 
attempt to control the forces 
that have aided and threat- 
ened human life since elec- 



tricity was harni'sscd but 
also of the feeling that the 
institutions around us are 
not to be trusted. 

All this and some terrif- 
ic fight scenes too. In the 
pilot, Jaime tries out her 
powers on that murderous 
blond . Sarah Corvus, after 
she tries to kill Will. (Corvus 
is played by Katee Sackhoff, 
the iconic Starbuck of 
"Battlestar Galactica," 
another huge influence at 
work here.) "Who are yoii?" 
Jaime asks, having chased 
Sarah down to a rooftop in 
the rain. "I'm the first bionic 



woman," sa\s 



and then 



the two go ni! . i'')uncls, 
'Matrix' s; . '• ..■cision. 

It's good -, ;', ■ ;»ccially 
since it quicK' ..-comes 
apparent that Jaime feels 
more affinity for Sarah than 
for her "creators." 

"Welcome to the game." 
says Jonas, when he finally 
acknowleds^es that Jaime 
may be more than a candi- 
date for termination. He's 
certainly no Oscar, but then 
no one would call this bionic 
woman "babe." 



I 




Tlffi CLARION CALL 



September 27. 2007 



flissilieis 



(imi Ills, Travel, Emplopeiil, For Ml hnmk iind lienmil Ws 



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chair of the weekm Lindsey 
Weider! 



iMMMiilHMMMHIII 

HpriUK Hii'uk 21)08 . Sell 
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ROLL OUT OF BED AND 

GO TO CLASS! Houses and 

apartments next to campus. 

See them at www.grayand- ^'^'^'^'^ word Delta Zeta sister 

company net or call FREE of the week Caitlin Hill! 

Gray and Co, 877-562-1020 

Good job to the Delta Zeta 



MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

acemontana(g)ccybernet.com 

(814)226-7316 

PAIV fOn BY mi CANVIVAn 



Happy 21st Birthdays Beth 

and Pete! 

Love, 

C&J 



Hi mom! 

-Amy Dom, & Lindsay 



Hey everyone, make good 
decisions this week. 



Megan, 

You're not allowed to be an 

eskimo 

Love, 

Steph 



8 Days!!! 



Brooklyn, 

Thanks for always reading 

The Call! 

-BK 



Get well soon Alero! 
-The Clarion Call 



True or False? 

Lets see how much you know! 



Take the Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay Grystar 

1. Celery has negative calories. It takes more calorii's to cat and digest than the a 
ery has initially 

a) True 

b) False 

2. There is a town in South Carolina called "Welcome" 

a) True 

b) False 

3. There are 20 bones in a human wrist. 

a) True 

b) False 

4. Dogs are America's most common pet. 

a) True 

b) False 

5. Mustard is the # 1 condiment served at ballpark 
concession stands. 

a) l>ue 

b) False 



'B-g 'q't^ 'q'j; 'b ^ 'Bi.saaMsuy 




Jeff Allen 

SOI'HOMORK, MUHICAI. THEATRK 

"The Golden Girls" 




By 

Adam Huff 

"What TV show 

would you skip class 

for?" 



EsTEBAN Brown 
Skn'ior, Thkatrk 

"America's Next Top Model" 







John Cerutti 

Skcondaky Education 

"Scrubs" 



Dave Merchant 

SoPHOMOKK, Art 

"Family Guv" 



Lindsey Allison 

Sknior, Music Education 

"Will & Grace" 



Courtney Marshall 

Sophomore, Psycology 

"C.S.I. Las Vegas" 







Page 6 



THE CLARION CALL 



''Star Wars" makes its way 
into two cartoon favorites 



Joey Pettine 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmpettiMt'WcJ.iiioM pclu 




"Robot Chicken 'Star 
Wars' Special" 
Creator: Seth Green 
Rating: 5/5 



"Family Guy 'Star Wars' 

Special" 

Creator: Seth McFarlane 

Rating: 4.5/5 

A louK tinu' ago. in the 
197l)s. the nnme (Jeorge 
Luca.'* graced theatre 
screens internationally. It 
would soon become a house- 
hold name, hut at that time 
it was nothing. The movie it 
was pasted on was what 
mattered. That movie was 
"Star Wars." technically 
"Star Wars Kpisode IV: A 
New Hope." However, at 
that time no one had any 
idea there were going to be 
two awesome sequels and 
then a trilogy of prequels 
that would let us all down so 
they just called it "Star 
Wars." 



"Star War.s" changed the 
v\a> films were made. Not 
only did it give us Harri.son 
Kord. but it also paved the 
way for the future of movies 
with what was, at that time, 
the most stateof-theait 
effects. Without "Stai 
Wars." there wouldn't be 
"Terminator 2." ".lurassic 
Park" or The Matrix." all 
milestone movies with the 
special effects today's socie- 
ty takes for granted. 

Without "Star Wars." we 
would have none of these. 
And there is one othi-r thing 
we wouldn't have: "Star 
Wars" parodies. 

These parodies include 
everything from Tauntaun 
musical videos to the falsely 
biographical "(Jeorge Lucas 
in Love." from "Star Wars 
Hap" to the "Darth Vader 
I'.sychic Hotline." Not to 
mention, the release of Seth 
Green's "Robot Chicken 
'Star Wars' Special" and 
Seth McFarlane's "Family 
Guy 'Star Wars' Special." 

Both of these satiric 
giants took on the "Star 
W'ars" parody mere months 
apart. Since both of the 
Seth's work regularly 
appears on each other's 
shows, it makes you wonder 
if they didn't work on them 
together, and both were very 
strong with the force. 

If you weren't lucky 
enough to catch either spe- 
cial when they premiered on 
Cartoon Network or Fox. 
then 1 suggest either start 
scouring YouTube or begin 
watching cartoon Networks 
Adult Swim nightly and 
hope you get lucky because 
these parodies are just as 
worth it as the movie 



September 27, 2007 



Local artists featured on new album 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjdbuffoneCo'cldrioiit'clu 




"Spacehalls." 

First off we have thi' 
"Robot Chicken 'Star Wars' 
Special." which ran the 
gambit from "Star Wars" on 
ice to Boba Fett making out 
with Hans Solo fro/en in 
carbonite, to Admiral 
Ackbar fish head cereal. 
\nd that's not even the tip 
of the Hothian iceberg, they 
do it all with action figure 
stop motion. I happily give 
their effort and comedic bril- 
liance five out of five leaves. 

Last Sunday, the sixth 
season of "Family Guy" pre- 
miered with their own "Star 
Wars" special. Instead of a 
slew of unrelated Monty 
Python -esque skits, they so 
far as to give us a full 
fledged lampoon of "A New 
Hope." fitting in Peter as 
Hans Solo, Stewie as Darth 
Vader, and it doesn't stop 
there. But what kind of a 
cartoon IVui would I be if I 
ruined it'.' All I can say is the 
animated shot for shot 
reproduction of original 
"Star Wars" scenes coupled 
with "Family Guy" genius 
makes it fantastic. While 
not as laugh out loud funny 
as the "Robot Chicken spe- 
cial, I still give it a 4.5 out of 
5. (Only because "Robot 
Chicken" made me laugh a 
little more.) 



Lead singer of Thrice 
makes solo album 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.edu 




"Please Come Home" 
Dustin Kensrue 
Rating: 5/5 



F'irst and foremost, to 
understand my obsession 
with Dustin Kensrue, one 
must first undei-stand how- 
he found his wav into mv 
life. 

A few months ago, well 
actually it was approxi- 
mately February, I was rid- 
ing to Seven Springs with 
my best friend, Mindi. and 
we were doing our usual car 
ritual: dancing and singing 
to random songs. The partic- 
ular song that happened to 
be on was "Artist in the 
Ambulance" by Thrice. 

At this point. Mindi 
turns to me and says that 
the leader singer of Thrice, 
Kensrue. released a solo 
album and that it was 
amazing. She then proceed- 
ed to put it on so that I could 
hear it. 

The first song she 
played was entitled "Pistol." 
I was at first thinking that 
it was about a gun. and then 
I realized that it was in fact 
written about me. 



Now, I know what you 
are thinking, how can a 
famous performer write a 
song about a girl from Pa.'.' 
Well, technically he didn't, 
but this song may as well be 
the theme song of my life. 

The song is about how a 
guy feels about the girl in 
his life and how much she 
influences what he does. 
The word pistol is in fact 
explaining the girlfriend. 

"You're the girl of my 
dreams/ And a pistol it 
seems, but you shoot me 
straight and true." 

I watched a DVD of one 
of his performances and he 
talks about how he wrote 
the song for his wife, which 
was a real bummer for me. 

Towards the end of the 
song, he talks about how 
this girl is everything he 
needs in his life and actual- 
ly proposes to her. 

Quite frankly, if "Pistol" 
was the only song that I 
ever heard on the album. I 
would still be absolutely in 
love with Kensrue. Well at 
least in love with him 
singing that song. 
Fortunately, the rest of the 
album did not let me down. 

My other favorite song 
is "Before You Were 
Beautiful." I feel like this 
song has actual meaning to 
women everywhere. 

The song is about a 
woman who grew up "inno- 
cent and pure" and then 
changed because of the 
expectations of women in 
today's society. 

"The magazines and 
media supplied you with 
their plastic protocol/ And 
maybe music television real- 
ly is the devil after all/ But 
all 1 can say is I knew you 
before/ \'ou were beautiful, 
back then/ Before you grew 




up. before you gave in." 

The song talks about 
how the woman desires love 
and affection, but instead of 
trying to find it she simply 
maintains physical relation- 
ships with all of the men 
that she ineets. 

"And all you want is to 
hear the words/ 'Dear Baby, 
I love youV So you hike your 
skirt higher still/ 'Till their 
eyes are all on you." 

It also talks about how 
despite the fact that she is 
beautiful, she refuses to let 
anyone see the real her. 
even though she so desper- 
ately wants to. 

Another favorite song of 
mine on the album is 
"Please Come Home." 

"Please Come Home" is 
about a guy who takes 
money from his father and 
then leaves home to do his 
own thing. The father is 
devastated and would do 
anything to have his son 
back. 

Overall I would recom- 
mend this album to every- 
one. I think it is great and 
allows for a big change from 
the sound of Thrice. 

Don't get me wrong, I 
love everything about 
Thrice and a lot of othei 
bands just like them, how- 
ever, every once in awhile 
it's nice to have a little bit of 
a change on my iPod. A little 
bit of a lighter change. 



"Spotlight" 
Drastically Classic 
Productions 
Rating: 3/5 



Drastically Classic 

Productions (DCP) has 
recently released its debut 
album. "Spotlight". The 
album is a collection of local 
Hip-Hop and R&B artists 
showcasing their talents. 
The majority of the perform- 
ers hail from Erie, Pa. and 
have a substantial amount 
of experience in the music 
business. 

The album features 
seven artists who are on the 
brink of making it big in the 
music industry. Rappers 
such as Novacane, Re. D. 
Joka and Missin' Link pro- 



vide most ol the last paced 
club beats like "Walk it like 
a Dog" and "Drop it," where- 
as the slow jams such as 
"Point A" and "Should Yuu" 
are taken care of by the 
beautiful Tiah Blanks and 
Toy. 

The lyrics to all of the 
songs are well writti'U bul 
would maybe havt> to h( 
altered a hit to he radio eli- 
gible, hence the parental 
advisory sticker on the 
album i-ovcr. The artists 
sing with passion and it's 
obvious that they mean 
what they are singing. The 
executive producer of DCP, 
James Thigpen (.I-Tiz). sup- 
plies all the .sounds, beats 
and vocals in two songs. 

'I-Tiz has been involved 
with music since a very 
young age. With idt)ls such 
as Michael Jackson. J-Tiz 
was also inspired to dance 
as well as sing. After seeing 
his dancing skills outweigh 
his singing skills, he decided 
to focus .solely on dancing. 
He was offered a four year 
scholarship after high 
school to dance in college 
but declined because his 
passion was producing 
music. After his life chang- 
ing decision, J-Tiz realized 
that producing music was 
the only thing he wanted to 
do in life. 

Thigpen started DCP in 




November of 2002 in hope of 
promoting local talents and 
of course tu endor.se his own 
prodiicti(sii>, DCP started off 
very small l)ut eventually 
grew into a ver\ well man- 
aged companv and has 
r('markai)l(' inu>ical talent 
to go along Willi ii. With 
such commitment and pas- 
sion. DCP is destined to 
have an impact in the music 
industr>. 

"Spotlight" has good 
sound with the right 
amount oC variety to he con- 
sidered a (|iialit\ album. I 
recomiiKiHl this album to 
anyoiu' who has a real 
appreciation lor thi' Hip- 
Hop and R&B genre. The 
album is full of raw talent 
and rising star.- and would 
be a great addition to an> 
music buffs collection. If the 
talents of DCP continue to 
progress, I would expect big- 
ger and better things in the 
future from them. 



"CYBORG" continued 
from page 5. 

With her big blue eyes 
and fair childlike face, 
Ryan, recently seen in 
"Jekyll." is perfect as an 
every woman upon whom 
kick-ass has been thrust. 
Previously adrift, Jaime 
now has no choice but to 
focus - if for no other reason 
than that the folks behind 
the bionics project are fairly 
cavalier about her well- 
being. "If it doesn't work 
out," says lead project 
meanie Jonas (the always 
welcome Miguel Ferrer), 
"we can always terminate." 

It's no longer Steve 
Austin's America, after all. 
Like any good sci-fi tale, 
"Bionic" reflects the fears 
and longings of the present, 
and as we have been told 
often in other contexts, the 
current mood of the country 
is something other than 
optimistic. Here, those anxi- 
eties are boiled down to a 
modern arms, and legs, 
race. The world is much fur- 
ther ahead technologically 



than it wants to admit, Will 
tells Jaime. The only ques- 
tion is who controls the 
goodies, and to what end. 

Will's father, for 
instance, would like to have 
a say, since he apparently 
invented a lot of the pro- 
grams that have turned 
Jaime into an unwitting 
super .soldier. Only he's kind 
of crazy, locked up in an 
underground prison facility. 
That is until a bad guy with 
a grvidge breaks him out, 
taking him to a mountain 
top stronghold and ... well. 
you see where this is going. 

If Wagner's Jaime 
Sommers was a gee-whiz, 
lookie- here portrait of what 
the mind can do with a few 
wires and a computer chip. 
Ryan's is a much more wise 
and wary archetype. In the 
last 30 years, our attitude 
toward technology, and life 
in general, has become a bit 
more cautious, a bit more 
overwhelmed. So Jaime is a 
symbol of her times, an 
embodiment not only of the 
attempt to control the forces 
that have aided and threat- 
ened human life since elec- 



tricity was harnessed but 
also of the feeling that the 
institutions around u> are 
not to be trusted 

All thi> and .^onie ternl'- 
ic fight scenes too. In the 
pilot, Jaime tries out her 
powers on that nuirdiM'ous 
blond , Sarah Corvus. after 
she tries to kill Will. (Corvus 
IS pla\ed !)>■ Katee Sackhoff. 
the iconic Starbuck of 
"Battlestar (lalactica," 

another huge inlluence at 
work hero.) -Who are yo\i->" 
Jaime a.sk>. havin,y < iiased 
Sarah down to a rooftop in 
the rain. "I'm the first hionif 
woman." -n> - !><■. and 'Len 
the two g(. i-oui\ds, 

"Matrix' stylt .< , ...ecision. 
It's good sUiif. r---n(M'inlly 
since it quick i; . .■comes 
apparent that J-iune feels 
more affinily for Sarali than 
t'n- he)- "creators." 

"Welcome to the game." 
says Jonas, when he finally 
acknowledues that Jaime 
may be more than a candi- 
date for termination. He's 
certainly no Oscar, but then 
no one would call this hionic 
woman "babe." 




IVnerein Cfmon? '■'. 



n 



,■••••••«, 




I 



■«■■•»•• 




Look in next week's issue for l!ie ans\v 



Page 7 



TH£ CLARION CALL 



September 27, 2007 



» 



Clissitieis 



\k TniicL Eiiiployiiieiil For Ml hmA ami (iciicnil lil^ 



FOR RENT 



TRAVEL 



chair of the weekm Lindsey 
Welder! 



LAKK.X APART.XU'INTS 
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Includ e^ Available Fall 
200S/Spriiig 2OO0 for 1-M 
people. Hou>es available for 
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at (814) 71.r;;i21 or 22H- 
\6H'.\. www.lakenajiart- 
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ROLL OCT OF HLI) \.\D 
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See them at www.grayand- 
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(Irav and Co. S77-r)(i21l)2() 



PERSONALS 



Spring Break 20()H . Sell 
Tri|)s. Lain Cash and Oo 

Vvvv. Call for group dis- «---— ~---------------------- 

coiints. Best Prices Happy 21st Birthdays Beth 

C( iiara nt eed! Jamaica, and Fete! 

Cancun, .\capulco. Love, 

1)0 llamas, S. Pailre, Florida. C&J 

.S00-(US-1849 or ._i_^.^ 

www stst ravel, com 

Hi mom! 

__________ "Amy, Dom, & Lindsay 



m » mmwmmm : mmi^. . ^ey everyone, make good 
Croat word Delta Zeta sister decisions this week. 
of the week Caitlin Hill! 



ON rUESVAY, M(9VEMBEK 6TH, V<9TT 



Andy 

MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

acemontana@ccybernet.com 

(814)226-7316 

PAW Wn BV THE CAmiVATE 



Ciood job to the Delta Zeta Megan, 

You're not allowed to be an 

eskimo 

Love, 

Steph 



8 Days!!! 



Brooklyn. 

Thanks for always reading 

The Call! 

-BK 



Get well soon Alero! 
■The Clarion Call 



True or False? 

Lets see how much you know! 



Take the Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay Grystar 

1. Celery has negative calories. It takes more calories to eat and digest than the ce 
ery has initially. 

a) Ti-ue 

b) False 

2. There is a town in South Carolina called "Welcome" 

a) True 
h) False 

3. There are 20 bones in a human wrist. 

a) True 

b) False 

4. Dogs are America's most common pet. 

a) True 
h) False 

5. Mustard is the # 1 condiment served at ballpark 
concession stands. 

a) True 

b) False 



•\ro 'q-f- 'q-i; 't: ". •);[ :s,i,),s\su\ 




Jeff Allen 

SoriioMoh'K. Musk- \i. Tiii'-.-vrKio 

■'Tlu' (ioldeii Ciirl.s" 




By 

Adam Huff 

'What TV show 

would you skip class 

forT 




John Cerutti 

Skc()ni).\i;v Kduc.viion 
"Scrubs" 



EsTEBAN Brown 

Si:ni()U, 'riii'.vrKi-; 
.\nierica"s Next Top Model" 






Dave Merchant 

Soi'no.MOKi;, Aur 
"Familv Cuv" 



Lindsey Allison 
Skniok, Musk- Educ^xtion 

"Will & Grace" 



Courtney Marshall 

SOPHOMOHK, PSY(-<)L<)(JY 

"C.S.I. Las Vegas" 






Pages 



TOR CLAMOR CALL 



September 27. 2007 



Sfirts 



M]-. Uk]Mi inprwcsM-l ^^^^ '^'^ ^ BliMisbDrg 



Golden Eagles volleyball keeps on rolling, defeats lUP 3-0 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_kgschroyer®clanon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - After 
their first loss of the 2007 
season last l\iesday to 
California, the Golden 
Eagles Volleyball Team was 
a little disappointed by the 
setback. "Our goal after 
that loss was to be undefeat- 
ed the rest of the season," 
said middle hitter Sarah 
Sheffield 

Whether the Golden 
Eagles can reach that goal 
remains to be seen. 
However, they have certain- 
ly gotten off to a nice start in 
accomplishing it. 

With a 3-0 win against 
Indiana Tuesday night, the 
Golden Eagles improved 
their record to 15-1 overall 
with a 3-1 mark in the 
PSAC-West. Combined with 
their wins against Bloom- 
field and Holy Family over 
the weekend, Clarion is 3-0 
since its loss to California. 

In the victory Christina 
Steiner led the way with 16 
kills and nine digs. On a 




The Golden Eagles volleyball team pictured above started the season 12-0. Clarion lost their last 
game to California 3-2. The Golden Eagles next home game will be September 25 when they take 
on lUP. (The Clarion Call/Mam Huff) 



more historical note, her 
thirteenth kill of the night 
put her in sole possession of 
fifth-place all-time on the 



career kills list for the with ten kills of her own, 

Golden Eagles. while Sarah Fries added 

Amanda Angermeier seven. Setter, Kristi Fiorillo 

was right behind Steiner picked up 38 assists and 



Vicky Gentile had 14 digs. 

The game marked the 
first time this season that 
the Golden Eagles swept a 
PSAC-West opponent. 

Clarion won the first 
two games by scores of 30- 18 
and 30-16. However, the 
Golden Eagles would be 
taken to the wire by the 
Crimson Hawks before win- 
ning the third game 3028. 

"It definitely feels good 
to get this win," said middle 
hitter Nicole Andrusz after 
the game against lUP. "It's 
more motivation for us to 
get back to where we were." 

At what is roughly the 
half-way point of the season, 
the Golden Eagles are five 
wins shy of matching their 
overall win total from last 
season. With their third 
PSAC-West victory against 
lUP, Clarion has already 
matched their section win 
total from last year. 

Steiner is currently the 
Golden Eagles kill leader 
with 250, Sarah Fries is sec- 
ond on the team with 197 
kills. For the second year in 
a row, Angermeier has been 



a reliable presence at the 
outside hitter spot, tallying 
146 kills. 

In her second season of 
setting up the Golden Eagle 
spikers, Fiorillo has already 
logged 696 assists. Getting 
the passes to Fiorillo once 
again has been libero 
Gentile. The new Clarion 
all-time digs leader. Gentile 
has not slowed down at all 
picking up 312 digs this 
year. 

Doing their best to make 
sure that Gentile doesn't 
have to pass the ball, fresh- 
men middle hitters Sheffield 
and Andrusz have done a 
great job of stepping up 
their blocking game. Going 
into their game against lUP, 
both were tied for the lead 
in blocks with 36 each. 

The Golden Eagles trav- 
el to West Chester this 
weekend for their PSAC- 
Crossover trip. Their next 
foray into PSAC-West play 
will be next Tuesday when 
they travel to Edinboro to 
play the Fighting Scots for 
the first time this season. 



Soccer duels to a 0-0 tie with Kutztown, currently in third place in PSAO-West 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjckovalovs@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - After 
giving up a two-goal lead in 
an eventual tie with 
Edinboro on September 17, 
Clarion hoped to redeem 
itself against PSAC Eastern 
Division, Kutztown, on 
Thursday Sept. 20. 

However, Kutztown was 
riding high after two strong 
victories against 

Bloomsburg and 13th 
ranked Shippensburg. The 
game ended in a 0-0 tie, the 
second straight tie for 
Clarion, after two overtime 
periods. The tie kept 

Clarion a game under .500 



overall at 3-4-2. 

Despite what has been a 
mostly one sided season, 
this game was fairly bal- 
anced. Clarion put up a 
total of 16 shots. Kutztown 
was not far behind with 15 
of their own. It was Clarion 
senior goalkeeper Jess 
Reed's third shutout of the 
season, saving a total of five 
shots on goal. 

The Golden Eagles 16 
shots was the most since 
September 1 against 
California, and the second 
most they have had all sea- 
son. Leading the attack was 
Chelsea Wolff, who had four 
shots. 

Alyssa Jacobs, Jill 
Miller, and Rachael Schmitz 
had three shots apiece. 



Beth Ellen Dibeler added 
two more while Caitlin 
Borden had one. 

With ten games left in 
the season, the. Golden 
Eagles are currently bat- 
tling for third place in the 
division with lUP, and not 
far behind second place 
Edinboro. Despite being 
outscored 26-7, they have 
already doubled their divi- 
sion victories from last year 
and show promise for 
improvement. 

Had it not been for a 
couple rough games against 
lUP and East Stroudsburg, 
the goal total would be 
much closer. The Golden 
Eagles have been commit- 
ting fewer fouls than their 
opponents have been so far. 



Clarion continues its 
home stand against Gannon 
on Sunday and takes on 
Western Division foe Lock 
Haven on Monday 

Gannon will be a good 
test for the Golden Eagles. 
The Golden Knights are cur- 
reaitly. -7-|-l ,g|M^^>ave 

Clarion has already 
played Lock Haven once this 
season. The result was a 2-1 
Golden Eagles victory on 
August 29. Kutztown will 
travel to Shippensburg on 
Monday, October 1, after 
having already defeated 
California 3-0 this past 
Saturday. 




This week around the world of sports 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarlon.edu 

There were so many 
good stories to choose from, 
so I figured I would take a 
look at everything that hap- 
pened in the sports world. 

The New England 
Patriots recently were 
caught videotaping the New 
York Jets defensive signals 
in week one. The scandal is 
not all that surprising. As 
Chiefs coach Herm Edwards 
so eloquently put it, "We 
play to win the game." For 
years, coaches have been 
looking for ways to gain the 
edge on their opponents. If 
they get caught, they take 
their lumps and look for 
new ways to get that edge. 

The bottom line is that 
coaches will do just about 
anything they can to win a 
game. For those of us who 
scoff at that notion, remem- 
ber that this is what these 
men do to make a living for 
themselves and their fami- 
lies. There is a tremendous 
amount of pressure to win, 
and no man wants to be 
caught holding a pink slip 
because his team didn't play 
well enough. I do not agree 
with what Bill Belichick did, 
but I'd think myself foolish 
if I did not understand why 
he did it. 

In other NFL news, the 
Cowboys signed former 



Tank Johnson. Despite his 
eight-game personal con- 
duct policy suspension, 
Dallas decided to sign the 
talented defender. Guess it 
just goes to show again that 
people will forgive anything 
if they think you can make 
them a winner. 

Just in case you hadn't 
heard on KDKA, WTAE, Off 
the Bench or every other 
Pittsburgh outlet, the 
Steelers are 3-0 for the first 
time since 1992. That was 
former Steelers coach Bill 
Cowher's first season. For 
you black and gold fanatics 
out there, that Steelers 
squad would finish 11-5 en 
route to winning the AFC 
Central before losing 24-3 to 
the Bills in the playoffs. 

The Pirates will play 
their last game of the season 
this Sunday As has become 
custom, they will hold fan 
appreciation day. And truth 
be told, you really have to be 
a fan to appreciate anything 
about the Pirates these 
days. This may have been 
the most disappointing in 
the 15 years of losing for the 
Buccos. 

On a positive note 
though, the Pirates named 
former Cleveland Indians 
baseball man Neal 
Huntingdon as their new 
general manager this week. 
In a statement to the Post- 
Gazette, new Pirates 
President Frank Coonelly 
said that, "He (Huntingdon) 



The Golden Eagles soccer team tied Kutztown in their most 
recent game. Clarion is back in action when they host Gannon 
on Sunday Sept. 30. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 

Rooney still knows how to pick 'em 



to lead our baseball opera- 
tions department." 

Hopefully Mr. Coonelly 
is right, as Huntingdon has 
the unenviable task of try- 
ing to make the Pirates a 
winner. Main storyline to 
watch here is whether or not 
he will retain Jim Tracy as 
manager. Should Tracy not 
be retained, Indians third 
base coach Joel Skinner is 
being rumored as a poten- 
tial replacement. 

The Penguins will begin 
play next week. Expec- 
tations are high as they 
have the reigning MVP, 
arguably the best young 
team in hockey, and the 
long-awaited deal confirm- 
ing that they will be in 
Pittsburgh until 2040. The 
Penguins turn-around last 
season was nothing short of 
incredible, and here's to 
hoping that they can keep it 
going this season. A Stanley 
Cup title may still be a little 
too much to hope for this 
year, but they'll certainly be 
a team to watch. 

Finally baseball is 
wrapping up their regular 
season. The Indians and 
Angels won their respective 
divisions, while the Yanks 
and Red Sox are still slug- 
ging it out in the East. 
Things are far more inter- 
esting in the National 
League, where (as of press 
time), no team had clinched 
a playoff spot. 



Clifton Brown 
The Sporting News 



Inside the Steelers' lock- 
er room, after Sunday's win 
against San Francisco, Mike 
Tomlin crossed paths with 
his boss, owner Dan Rooney 
The two men looked at each 
other and smiled. 

Why wouldn't they? The 
Steelers are 3-0 for the first 
time since 1992, and clearly 
Rooney still knows how to 
pick head coaches. Only 34 
when he was hired in 
January Tomlin was not a 
safe choice. He had no head 
coaching experience and 
was coming to a veteran 
team used to doing things a 
certain way 

But when Bill Cowher 
resigned after a successful 
15-year run in Pittsburgh 
that included a Super Bowl 
victory, Rooney wanted the 
same attributes he had 
sought when he hired 
Cowher in 1992. Rooney 
wanted a young coach with 
energy. He wanted a coach 
who would be in Pittsburgh 
a long time. He wanted a 
coach who knew defense. 

"Mike struck me as 
being young, but I knew he 
could do the job," says 
Rooney. 

It's early, but it appears 
Rooney has gotten it right 
again. The Steelers have 
allowed just two touch- 
downs this season, display- 
ing a flexible defense more 



wiUing to take risks than it 
did under Cowher. There 
were numerous times dur- 
ing Pittsburgh's 37-16 victo- 
ry over San Francisco when 
49ers quarterback Alex 
Smith (l7-for35) was run- 
ning not by design but for 
his safety. 

Tomlin has given coordi- 
nator Dick LeBeau the 
green light to blitz, to deploy 
different formations, to take 
even more advantage of the 
versatility of Pro Bowl safe- 
ty Troy Polamalu. The 
Steelers' base defense is still 
the 3-4, but sometimes they 
use four down linemen. 
Sometimes they use six 
defensive backs. And always 
they look to create chaos for 
the offense. 

"We're doing a few 
things differently, moving 
around, trying to confuse 
the offensive line," says 
defensive end Brett Keisel. 
"We still haven't used all of 
our defensive packages. We 
still have a few things up 
our sleeve. 

"We love it. Coach 
LeBeau has a little more 
freedom to get creative, to 
run the things he wants to 
run. I'm sure when it's a 
tight situation, he checks 
with coach Tomlin. But in 
the past, I think coach 
LeBeau got overstepped by 
coach Cowher. I don't know 
that for a fact, but it seems 
like we're constantly blitz- 
ing this year, where last 
year I think we stayed in 



I 



some of our vanilla pack- 
ages too much." 

Based on their quick 
start, the Steelers have 
bought into TomUn's teach- 
ings and have entered the 
large early season group of 
legitimate Super Bowl con- 
tenders. They have a solid 
defense. They have a solid 
running game, led by Willie 
Parker, who has rushed for 
more than 100 yards in all 
three games. They have a 
quarterback in Ben Roeth" 
lisberger who has already 
won a Super Bowl but is not 
required to carry the team 
on his shoulders. 

The Steelers scored two 
touchdowns against the 
49ers without their offen- 
sive unit: on a 98-yard kick- 
off return by Allen Rossum 
and on a 50-yard intercep- 
tion return by cornerback 
Bryant McFadden. Smith 
misread the Steelers' cover- 
age on McFadden's intercep- 
tion, and after McFadden 
started running toward the 
end zone. Smith was the last 
player who had a chance to 
stop him. 

"I knew if I let the quar- 
terback stop me, I wasn't 
going to hear the last of it 
from the guys," says 
McFadden. 

If the Steelers keep win- 
ning, they will look even 
smarter for choosing 
Tomlin, not the safe choice 
but perhaps the right one. 



September 27. 2007 



Tffi CLAWON CALL 



Page 9 



Golden Eagle football falls to 0-4 with 52-10 loss to Bloomsburg 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJsscritchf®clarion.eclu 



CLARION, Sept. 25 - On 
Saturday night, inexperi- 
ence got the best of our 
Golden Eagles as they fell to 
the Huskies of Bloomsburg 
by the score of 52-10 at 
Clarion University Family 
Day before a crowd of 4,500. 

Clarion looked promis- 
ing as they started the game 
off strong, but after halftime 
it all went downhill. The 
first drive of the game for 
Clarion, they drove right 
down the field, but failed to 
score as a field goal was 
missed, therefore continu- 
ing the Golden Eagles' trend 
of missed opportunities. 

The first scoring of the 
game came when Husky 
kicker Jon Koenig booted a 
25-yard field goal to put 
Bloomsburg ahead 3-0. 
Shortly after, with 10:20 



remaining in the second 
quarter. Clarion tied it with 
37-yard field goal by Robert 
Mamula which broke the 
Golden Eagles even with the 
Huskies at 3-3. 

Bloomsburg running 
back Jamar Brittingham 
scored on his first of three 
touchdowns with 7^55 left in 
the second, when he took a 
three-yard run into the end 
zone to put the Huskies up 
10-3. Late in the second. 
Clarion drove down to 
Bloomsburg's nine yard line 
and had a chance to tie the 
game, but quarterback Tyler 
Huether was intercepted in 
the end zone with 1^50 left 
in the quarter. 

Momentum severely 
shifted in the Huskies' favor 
after the turnover when 
they drove 90 yards in 10 
plays to set up another 
Brittingham touchdown run 
from one yard out with 
seven seconds remaining to 
make the score 17-3. The 
big play on that drive was a 



Bloomsburg fake field goal 
which completely fooled the 
Golden Eagles and set up 
the aforementioned touch- 
down. 

Early in the third, 
Brittingham had his third 
and final touchdown from 
four yards away to put the 
Huskies ahead 24-3. 

The Golden Eagles had 
some fight left in them, how- 
ever, when Huether hit 
Pierre Odom with a 29-yard 
pass for a touchdown to cut 
Bloomsburg's lead to 24-10. 

That was the last score 
of the game for Clarion, but 
Bloomsburg's night was far 
from over. They drove down 
the field and scored on a 
Dan Latorre quarterback 
sneak from a yard out to put 
the Huskies up 31-10. They 
would score three more 
times to add insult to injury 
and finally win the game 52- 
10. 

Huether went 10-27 for 
200 yards for 200 yards and 
a touchdown, Eddie 




The Golden Eagles pictured above In their September 22 game versus Bloomsburg. Clarion lost 
the game to Bloomsburg 52-10. The Golden Eagles will travel to California to take on the 13th 
ranked Vulcans on September 29. (The Clarion Ca///Stefanie Jula) 

tically in just about every el to #13 California this 

offensive category and week for their PSAC West 

dropped to 0-4 overall, but opener. Kickoff is set for 3 

will try to rebound this pm. 
week. 

The Golden Eagles trav 



Emmanuel rushed 24 times 
for 104 yards, and Pierre 
Odom caught seven passes 
for 115 yards and one touch- 
down. 

Clarion was beat statis- 



Tennis places second at East Regionals 



Denise Simens 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dnsimens@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 25 - The 
tennis team celebrated a 
victory over Westminster at 
Campbell Courts on 
September 17. The duo of 
Corin and Devin Rombach 
defeated Dana Larson and 
Christina Comisso 9-7 to 
secure first place in doubles. 

They were followed 
closely by teammates Lisa 
Baumgartner and Kassie 
Leuschel, who secured sec- 
ond place over 
Westminster's April Scudere 
andUn^y Newman 81.^ ,„ 

In »jiinglei» Corin 
Rombach placed first with a 
6-1, 6-1 win over April 
Scudere, and Baumgartner 
took second over Larson 6-0, 
6-1. Clarion's Leuschel and 
Ashleigh Hinds also won 
their matches, helping to 
secure the 6-3 win over 
Westminster. 

On September 21, the 
team defeated Lemoyne 6-3 
and improved their record to 



3-1 for the season. Head 
Coach Lori Sabatose said, 
"Tennis is having a great 
season this year." 

This past weekend, the 
team traveled to 

Bloomsburg University for 
the Intercollegiate Tennis 
Association East Women's 
Regional Championships. 
The 64-team tournament is 
the largest in division II ten- 
nis. 



This year, the tenuis 
team has three new doubles 
teams, and all of them com- 
peted well enough to come 
back for the second day of 
competition. 

Baumgartner and 

Leuschel defeated four 
teams in a row and 
advanced to the final B dou- 
bles draw against California 
University. "The quarterfi- 
nal match against Bryant's 




The Golden Eagles tennis team is pictured in action during their 
match against on September 25 against Ashland. Their next 
match on September 28. (The Clarion Ca///Andy Lander) 



Mullen and Francazio duo 
for a semifinals position was 
a huge victory for Lisa and 
Kassie," said head coach 
Lisa Sabatose. 

California edged their 
way on top in the final 
match to win 8-4 over 
Clarion. "The Division II 
East Regional match should 
help our national ranking," 
said Sabatose. 

Senior Lisa 

Baumgartner is the winner 
of the Division II National 
Collegiate Athletic 

Association Sportsmanship 
Award. It is the first time 
that a Clarion University 
athlete has won this award. 
Baumgartner will be pre- 
sented with the award by 
the NCAA at halftime of the 
football game vs Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 
on October 27. 

The Golden Eagle's sea- 
son ends with matches 
against Ashland and St. 
Vincent, followed by a PSAC 
finale hosted by Bloomsburg 
on October 6 and 7. 



Fries reaches 1,000 kills 



Sports Information 

rhermanSclarion.edu 
crossetti9ctarion.edu 



CLARION - Clarion Unive- 
rsity senior right-side hitter 
Sarah Fries recently bec- 
ame the eighth player in 
school history to record 
1,000 career kills and now 
has 1,015 through Sept. 25. 

Fries, who ranks eighth 
in school history in career 
kills, is the second Golden 
Eagle to surpass 1,000 
career kills this season join- 
ing teammate Christina 
Steiner (5th, 1,108). It 
marks third time in school 
history that a pair of team- 
mates surpassed 1,000 
career kills in the same sea- 
son - 2002 - Melanie Bull 
and Beth Stalder; 2004 - 
Colleen Sherk and Sara 
Heyl. 

On the season, Fries is 
second on the Golden Eagles 
with 196 kills (3.92 per 
game) and ranked third in 
the PSAC in kills per game 
in games played through 
Sept. 22. She has also added 



131 digs, 17 set assists, 27 
aces and 25 blocks on the 
year. 

Pries had a career-high 
332 kills (2.79 per game) in 
2005 and then added 315 
(2.79 per game) last season. 

Clarion is 15-1 on the 
year and 3-1 in the PSAC- 
West. The Golden Eagles 
return to action with three 
matches at West Chester 
Friday and Saturday in 
Pennsylvania State Athletic 
Conference Crossover 

action. 

Clarion faces 

Shippensburg Friday and 
West Chester and East 
Stroudsburg Saturday 




Sarah RiM 



i tw iii m >ii ) i i i M»> i * ii nw »i .u. i i i 




NTRAf^URAL NEWS 

Doug Krtepp - Intramural. Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393- 1 667 



Flag Football Results 

tIMIM 

tilHtiOut 76-0 

Purple Cook Kush SO-22 

Pen Pushers 52-6 

Mcssin w/ Sasq. 3S«22 

Crimson Criminal S8'I2 

People's Champs f 

X-Factor 41-34 



Your Mom 
FJyBaft 
FNR 

That Team 
Click Clack 
Card Gnomes 
IfTWsHate 

9/20/07 

WCB Therti 
D^ Destroyer 
Mean Machine 
Lockdown 
9/19/07 
C Monster 
If This Hab 
UntouchaUes 
Card Gnomes 
Fly Bait 

Crimson Crim 
KSAC 
98 Degrees 



CNcIa Chick Yea 39-38 
X Factor 28-20 

Little Pigs 68-0 

St NUC-LANA 55.8 

Purple Cobra 48-36 

Team Baraks 22-9 

Franchise 48-27 

BNKennelz S4.I4 

Lights Out 40-21 

FNR F 

3 in 3 Out 38.28 

Goonies 32-18 



Beach Volleyball Results 

9/24/07 

Off tn Slower Delta Zeu 15.9. 21-19 
Adidas Aces F 

8e sure to check th« game 

schedules for next week's IM games 

due to shortened A.LF. week! 



Tennis 

mm 

Sara Hinei 
Megan Parsons 
Samintha Specht 
Rob Lawrence 
Reed Enrieco 
Anch'ew Smith 
Andrew Smith 

9/20/07 
Sara Mines 
Morgan Welsh 
Megan (Arsons 
Devin Burda 
Robb Lawrence 
Andrew Smith 
Nick Caggiano 



Results 

Kara Blwonciyk 6«0 

Sara Mines 6«0 

Moi^n Welsh 6-1 

VitoAdcbSi 7-6 

Corey Sternthal 6-i 

NickCaggiarK> 6*2 

Zach Steinmetz 6-1 

tydia Braham 64) 

Kara Blazonczf k 6-0 

Samanito Specht 6-2 

John Burnett 6-4 

Zach Steinmctz 7-5 

OabfielProiew 6^ 

^btihew Goldyn 6*2 



Dodgeball Results 

mm 

Cmcinnati Bonties Ranch 44 
Cincinnati Bonties Team Steak 
We Want Sheea Balzanya Face 



mmt 

Gnt Nasty 
4 South 
Ranch 44 
WeWantSheetz 
Cincift. Bonties 



Pandas 
Pandas 

4 South 
St Nuc-Lana 
little Pig's 



2.0 

F 

F 



2.0 
2^ 
M 
2-0 
F 



Intramurals on the Web 
clarion.edu/intramurals 





Outdoor Soccer Results 



Porckchop II Entourage (In OT) 5-4 
Porkchops Team Crash 3* I 

Dunbp Rcffncr's Mom 9-2 



mmt 

% Elmo's Fire Entourage 
Pork Chops KF Soneheads 
Sarbous Pork Chops II 



F 

4-0 
2-0 



WL Banner 
Delta Zeta 
Ugly Sock 
Yes or No 
In Your Face 



Volleyball Results 



CUStafT 21-17. 21-iO 
Baiters 21-12. 21-H 

Dysfimctionals F 

No Names 2I«I8. 13.21. 15.13 
AChallll 21.16.18.21.15-10 
WW for Sets Tccaaamm2 2M 1. 21-12 



9/24/07 

CU Staff 
WL Banner 

9LIW07 

Yes or No 

In your Face 
AthlChaUII 



Ugly Stick 
Wolverines 



21-11. 2MS 
21.17. 21-4 



DysfuncDorwIs F 

NoNames 19.21. 2I.I2. 15.13 
Wolvcnnes 21-19. 21-1 1 



Golf Scramble Champs 

Nick Snell, Greg Bean. Bj Roth, and 
John Blumer shot an amazing 16 under 
par in diis year's four person scranr»ble! 



United Way 5 K Race 

Saturday, 9/30 @ 9 a,m. 

Race day registration starts at 7:30 zm at the 
stadium. Stop by the REC to pick up a 
registration sheet Be one of the first 3S0 to 
register and get a free T-shirt CUP 
students receive half price deal courtesy of 
thelMofflcell 

CLUB SPORT CORNER 




Men's Rugby "Saturday, 9/29 I pm 

Match at the stadium VS Franciscan U. 
Women's Rugby • Sunday, 9/30 
Match at the sadiumVSIUP 
Men's Volleyball - 

Tournanf\em Saturday, 9/29 

Action starts at 9 a.m. at the REC Center 

Sevent schools are invited 



. 



♦ 



Page 10 



THE CLAMOH CALL 



September 27. 2007 




ruOctobemOth 

THt 




p«)kr 




Sliowt jm elZ pm D q or$ : 6pm 



Ticketsr 



Gefii mef Ilnf o Desk 




Check out how 
you can prevent 
mononucleosis 







Theatre Dept. to 
perform The 
Guys" 




Girls soccer 
remains In 3rd In 
PSAOWest 



One copy free 



THECL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 





Volume 94 Issue 4 



October 4, 2007 




RSO funding policies questioned 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Calf Staff Writer 

sJew1ckson<klai1on.edu 

Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s.bekoebtertJdarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 28 - The 
restrictions of allocations 
for Recognized Student 
Organizations (RSOs) and 
the funding policies of stu- 
dent senate have recently 
raised questions and con' 
cern across campus. 

One of the current 
RSOs that is not funded by 
student senate is the 
Intervarsity Christian 
Organization. According to 
the student senate, it is not 
funded due to the "selectivi- 
ty" of the organization. 

However, the issue lies 
in the fact that organiza- 
tions such as sports teams 
are funded even though 
they are selective organiza- 
tions, due to the fact that 
you must try out to earn a 
position on any team. 

According to the stu- 



dent ^nate*s conatitution. 
student senate is to help 
support social groups and 
other organiiations, hower 
er; it states that religious 
organiMtions are not to be 
funded. 

"The purpose of student 
senate funding is to pro- 
mote opportunities for 
development and educatton 
outside of the classroom 
and money should be alio' 
cated to any student organ' 
izatiwi that aims to benefit 
the student population as a 
whole," said University 
Activities Board graduate 
assitant, Heather Stork. 
"Although some RSOs tar- 
get specific populations, for 
example, politieal and reU- 
gious affiliated organiza- 
tions, there is no require- 
ment for membership and 
any student has the cq)por 
nity to join," 

Stork also said she felt 
that the current procedui«s 
were unfair. 

"It is not fair to piwide 
student money to athletic 
sports teams* where mem- 



bership is often small and 
determined by a coach, and 
not to other organizations 
is which all students have 
the opportunity to partici- 
pate," she said. 

President of student 
senate, Dustin McElhattan 
said, "We found an obvious 
wjntradiction in our fund- 
ing policy and we are look- 
ing specifically into the 
funding process for reli- 
gious organizations." 

Currently the funding 
of religious ca-ganizations is 
under review. The funding 
for different groups and 
organizations on campus 
comes from the student 
activities fees and accord- 
ing to treasuer of student 
senate, Heather Puhalla, 
the budget that the student 
senate has to work with is 
limited. 

"We try our best to 
please everyone considering 
that we have a limited 
amount of budget to work 
with. We try to fix or get 
the biggest issues first," 
said Pullalla. 



Student senate intends 
to look at state views on 
this issue and look at the 
religious views on this 
issue. 

"I think that they (stu- 
dent senate] should fund 
religious affiliated oi^ani- 
zations, and even though 
this is a nondemonination- 
al campus, they should 
fund every organization," 
said sophomore elementary 
education, 8«»ndary edu- 
cation social studies major, 
Shawna Lind. 

"If student senate is 
going to fund student 
organizations they should 
fund every organization 
they recognize and not dis- 
criminate against organiza- 
tions," said Brittany Hartz, 
junior information systems 
and business administra- 
tion major. 

McElhattan said, 

"Hopefully in the near 
future we will get it right, 
in whatever the decision 
turns out to be." 



PLCB grants Clarion 
Police Borough funds 



Donald Baum 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_clwbaum@clarion.eclu 

CIJ^RION. Sept. 29 - The 
Pennsylvania Liquor 

Control Board (PLCB) 
granted the Clarion 
Borough Police $11,500 in 
September for increased 
patrols, combating under- 
age and high risk drinking, 
prevention programs and 
other educational materials. 

Since 1999, the PLCB 
has awarded over $3 million 
in grants to numerous enti- 
ties throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

The grants are intended 
to support a wide range of 
initiatives aimed at combat- 
ing the problem of underage 
and high risk drinking 
including law enforcement 
training, and community 
and teen outreach. 

According to the Clarion 
University Public Safety 
office, they currently have 
"no information at this 
time" pertaining to any joint 
efforts between the 



University Police and the 
Borough Police concerning 
the grant. 

CUP is a designated dry 
campus. However, a number 
of underage drinking 
arrests made by Clarion 
Borough Police involve CUP 
students. 

The University .strictly 
prohibits possession of alco- 
hol or controlled substances 
on university property 
including all on campus res- 
idences. The policy regard- 
ing possession and con- 
sumption of alcoholic bever- 
ages does not apply to off- 
campus residences, such as 
Reinhard Villages, which 
are owned by Clarion 
University Foundation. 

Reinhard is not subject 
to the same restrictions as 
on campus residences, how- 
ever! they do have rules con- 
cerning consumption of 
alcohol that residents must 
adhere to. 



See "PLCB" 
continued on page 2. 



I American Bar Association re-approves CUP paralegal program 



Lacey LIchvar 
C/ar/onCa// Staff Writer 

sJelichvar@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 29 - The 
American Bar Association 
(ABA) recently re-approved 
the paralegal studies pro- 
gram at Clarion University- 
Venango Campus. 

This program provides 
students with the opportu- 
nity to earn an associate of 
science degree in paralegal 
studies. 

Director of the paralegal 
studies program, Dr. Frank 
Shepard of the finance 
department of the Clarion 
Venango Campus, said that 
they have been ABA 
approved since the early 
90s. 

Once approved, the pro- 
gram has a seven-year 
approval period with inter- 
im reports due every two 
years to make sure they are 
following the ABA require- 
ments. 

The program currently 
has 30 students enrolled. 

Shepard said, "The ABA 



has very stringent stan- 
dards for the curriculum 
including detailed general 
education courses and very 
specific legal courses with 
the primary focus on legal 
skills over theory." 

As defined by the 
University's paralegal Web 
page, a paralegal is "...a 
person, qualified by educa- 
tion, training or work expe- 
rience who is employed or 
retained by a lawyer, law 
office, corporation, govern- 
mental agency or other enti- 
ty and who performs specifi- 
cally delegated substantive 
legal work for which a 
lawyer is responsible." 

A list of the courses and 
electives can be found at the 
University's paralegal Web 
page. 

This list includes cours- 
es such as Legal Writing, 
Methods of Legal Research 
and Wills, Trusts, Estates. 

In addition the program 
is required to have substan- 
tial access to law libraries. 
Shepard said that before the 
paralegal program was orig- 
inally approved the Venango 



campus library had to 
increase their legal hold- 
ings. 

Students also use the 
libraries at both the Clarion 
and Venango County 
Courthouses. 

Each student in the pro- 
gram is given a card that 
allows them access to Lexis 
Nexus which is an online 
law library. 

After completing the 
two-year paralegal program 
students are prepared to 
enter the work force, though 
some chose to earn their 
Bachelors Degree and pur- 
sue law school. 

A major contributor to 
the large job pool for parale- 
gals is due to the wide vari- 
ety of jobs they can take 
on. 

According to the ABA 
Web site, paralegals can 
find work in law firms, cor- 
porate legal departments, 
insurance companies, estate 
and trust departments of 
large banks, hospitals and 
numerous other companies 
and organizations. 




The Clarion University Venango Campus has liad tlieir paralegal program recently re-approved by 
the American Bar Association. (The Clarion Call/ Dr. Jerri Gent ) 



Students on CUP campus opt to go without shoes for one month 




Three students on the CUP campus have opted to go without shoes in an effort to raise aware- 
ness and funds for orphaned children overseas. (The Clarion Call/Daria Kurnal) 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyori@clanon.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 28 - Three 
Clarion University students 
have opted to go without 
shoes in an effort to raise 
awareness and funds for 
orphaned children overseas. 
Jennifer Martin, a fifth 
year Library Science Major, 
Matt Gutherie, a senior his- 
tory major; and sophomore, 
library science and early 
education major, Ian 
Snyder, have been walking 
around campus shoeless 
since Sept. 10 in order to get 
the attention of students 



across campus and to get 
individuals to ask questions. 

Martin, Snyder and 
Gutherie are working on a 
charity project to raise 
money for the Agape 
Children's Home, but they 
are also doing this to bring 
awareness to the Karen 
tribe in Thailand/Burma. 

Martin and Gutherie 
wanted to bring attention to 
the current state the Karen 
tribe lives in on refuges 
camps. 

"These people [of the 
Karen Tribe] are the gen- 
tlest people 1 have ever 
met," Martin said. "We are 
doing this because both 
Matt and 1 worked with 



members of the Karen tribe 
this summer in Thailand," 
said Martin. "Matt was up 
in Musagee working with 
kids and teaching them 
English and 1 was in Mae 
Sot and lived for a bit with 
the kids at the Agape 
Children's home while visit- 
ing one of the Burgesses 
refugee camps and crossing 
over into Burma." 

Martin and Gutherie 
traveled with the 

InterVarsity Christian 
Fellowship this past sum- 
mer to do the global project 
in Thailand. 

See "SHOES" 
continued on page 2. 



> ' ^%^i^.4l«^H«« 






Fi^tf r*.j#^ 



Page 10 



TfflS CLARlOy CAU. 



September 27, 2QQ7 





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I CALL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



Volume 94 Issue 4 



October 4. 2007 



RSO funding policies questioned 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ie6rickson@clarion.eclu 

Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler®clai ion.edu 



dent senate's constitution, bership is often small and 
student senate is to help determined by a coach, and 
support social groups and not to other organizations 
other organizations, howev in which all students have 
er; it states that religious the opportunity to partici- 
organizations are not to be pate," she said. 
Winded. President of student 
"The purpose of student senate, Dustin McElhattan 
senate funding is to pro- said, "We found an obvious 
mote opportunities for contradiction in our fund- 
development and education ing policy, and we are look- 
outside of the classroom ing specifically into the 
and money should be alio* funding process for reli- 



CLARION, Sept. 28 - The 
restrictions of allocations 
for Recognized Student 
Organizations (RSOs) and 
the funding policies of stu- 

dent senate have recently eated to any student organ- gious organizations." 
raised questions and con- i^^tion that aims to benefit Currently the funding 

cern across campus. the Student population as a of religious organizations is 

RQH ft .° 7p ""Tfu '^^°^^'" ^^'^ University under review. The funding 

RSOs that IS not funded by Activities Board graduate for different groups and 

student senate is the ^ssitant, Heather Stork, organizations on campus 

"Although some RSOs tar- comes from the student 
get specific populations, for activities fees and accord- 
example, political and reli- ing to treasuer of student 
gious affiliated organiza- senate, Heather Puhalla, 



Intervarsity Christian 
Organization. According to 
the student senate, it is not 
funded due to the "selectivi- 
ty" of the organization. 



Student senate intends 
to look at state views on 
this issue and look at the 
religious views on this 
issue. 

"I think that they (stu- 
dent senate] should fund 
religious affiliated organi- 
zations, and even though 
this is a non-demonination- 
al campus, they should 
fund every organization," 
said sophomore elementary 
education, secondary edu- 
cation social studies major, 
Shawna Lind. 

"If student senate is 
going to fund student 
organizations they should 
fund every organization 
they recognize and not dis- 
criminate against organiza- 
tions," said Brittany Hartz, 



PLCB grants Clarion 
Police Borougli funds 



However, the issue lies 

in the fact that organiza- aly'studenrharthTop^r 
tions such as sports teams j^j^-y ^^ jqjjj » 

Stork also said she felt 
that the current procedures 
were unfair. 

"It is not fair to provide 
student money to athletic 



are funded even though 
they are selective organiza- 
tions, due to the fact that 
you must try out to earn a 
position on any team. 



According to the stu- ^^^, ^^^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^ 



tions, there is no require- the budget that the student junior information systems 

raent for membership and senate has to work with is and business administra- 

limited. tion major. 

"We try our best to McElhattan said, 

please everyone considering "Hopefully in the near 

that we have a limited future we will get it right, 

amount of budget to work in whatever the decision 

with. We try to fix or get turns out to be." 
the biggest issues first," 
said PuUalla. 



Donald Baum 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_clwbaum@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Sept. 29 - The 
Pennsylvania Liquor 

Control Board (PLCB) 
granted the Clarion 
Borough Police $11,500 in 
September for increased 
patrols, combating under- 
age and high risk drinking, 
prevention programs and 
other educational materials. 
Since 1999, the PLCB 
has awarded over $3 million 
in grants to numerous enti- 
ties throughout the 
Commonwealth. 

The grants are intended 
to support a wide range of 
initiatives aimed at combat- 
ing the problem of underage 
and high risk drinking 
including law enforcement 
training, and community 
and teen outreach. 

According to the Clarion 
University Public Safety 
office, they currently have 
"no information at this 
time" pertaining to any joint 
efforts between the 



University Police and the 
Borough Police concerning 
the grant. 

CUP is a designated (hy 
campus. However, a nunilxM- 
of underage dritikiiig 
arrests made by Clarion 
Borough Police involve CUP 
students. 

The University >trictly 
prohibits possession of alco- 
hol or controlled substances 
on university property 
including all on campus res- 
idences. The policy regard- 
ing possession and con- 
sumption of alcoholic bever- 
ages does not apply to off- 
campus residences, such as 
Reinhard Villages, which 
are owned by Clarion 
University Foundation. 

Reinhard is not subject 
to the same restrictions as 
on campus residences, how- 
ever; they do have rules con- 
cerning consumption of 
alcohol that residents must 
adhere to. 



See "PLCB" 
continued on page 2. 



t ' ' ' """'"" "" ' ""'" ' ' " ' """"- ' I efforts between the Continued on page 2 

American Bar Association re-approves CUP paralegal program 



Lacey Lichvar 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_lelichvar@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Sept. 29 - The 
American Bar Association 
(ABA) recently re-approved 
the paralegal studies pro- 
gram at Clarion University- 
Venango Campus. 

This program provides 
students with the opportu- 
nity to earn an associate of 
science degree in paralegal 
studies. 

Director of the paralegal 
studies program. Dr. Frank 
Shepard of the finance 
department of the Clarion 
Venango Campus, said that 
they have been ABA 
approved since the early 
90s. 

Once approved, the pro- 
gram has a seven-year 
approval period with inter- 
im reports due every two 
years to make sure they are 
following the ABA require- 
ments. 

The program currently 
has 30 students enrolled. 

Shepard said, "The ABA 



has very stringent stan 
dards for the curriculum 
including detailed general 
education courses and very 
specific legal courses with 
the primary focus on legal 
skills over theory." 

As defined by the 
University's paralegal Web 
page, a paralegal is "...a 
person, qualified by educa- 
tion, training or work expe- 
rience who is employed or 
retained by a lawyer, law 
office, corporation, govern- 
mental agency or other enti- 
ty and who performs specifi- 
cally delegated substantive 
legal work for which a 
lawyer is responsible." 

A list of the courses and 
electives can be found at the 
University's paralegal Web 
page. 

This list includes cours- 
es such as Legal Writing, 
Methods of Legal Research 
and Wills, Trusts, Estates. 

In addition the program 
is required to have substan- 
tial access to law libraries. 
Shepard said that before the 
paralegal program was orig 
inally approved the Venango 



campus library had to 
increase their legal hold- 
ings. 

Students also use the 
libraries at both the Clarion 
and Venango County 
Courthouses. 

Each student in the pro- 
gram is given a card that 
allows them access to Lexis 
Nexus which is an online 
law library. 

After completing the 
two-year paralegal program 
students are prepared to 
enter the work force, though 
some chose to earn their 
Bachelors Degree and pur- 
sue law school. 

A major contributor to 
the large job pool for parale- 
gals is due to the wide vari- 
ety of jobs they can take 
on. 

According to the ABA 
Web site, paralegals can 
find work in law firms, cor- 
porate legal departments, 
insurance companies, estate 
and trust departments of 
large banks, hospitals and 
numerous other companies 
and organizations. 




Shepard said, "The ABA inally approved the Venango " ^^® American Bar Associattor 

Students on CUP campus opt to go without 



The Clarion University Venango Campus has had their paralegal program recently re-approved by 
the American Bar Association. (The Clarion Call/ Dr. Jerri Gent ) 



shoes for one month 




Three students on the CUP campus have opted to go without shoes in an effort to raise aware- 
ness and funds for orphaned children overseas. (The Clarion Call/Daria Kurnal) 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyori@clanon.edu 

CLARION. Sept. 28 - Three 
Clarion University students 
have opted to go without 
shoes in an effort to raise 
awareness and funds for 
orphaned children overseas. 
Jennifer Martin, a fifth 
year Library Science Major, 
Matt Gutherie. a senior his- 
tory major: and sophomore, 
library science and early 
education major. Ian 
Snyder, have been walking 
around campus shoeless 
since Sept. 10 in order to get 
the attention of students 



across campus and to get 
individuals to ask questions. 

Martin. Snyder and 
Gutherie are working on a 
charity project to raise 
money for the Agape 
Children's Home, but they 
are also doing this to bring 
awareness to the Karen 
tribe in Thailand/Burma. 

Martin and Gutherie 
wanted to bring attention to 
the current state the Karen 
tribe lives in on refuges 
camps. 

"These people [of the 
Karen Tribe] are the gen- 
tlest people I have ever 
met." Martin said. "We are 
doing this because both 
Matt and I wo-kcd with 



members of the Karen tribe 
this summer in Thailand," 
said Martin. "Matt was up 
in Musagee working with 
kids and teaching them 
English and I was in Mae 
Sot and lived for a hit with 
the kids at the Agape 
Children's home while visit- 
ing one of the Burgesses 
refugee camps and crossing 
over into Burma." 

Martin and Gutherie 
traveled with the 

InterVarsity Christian 
Fellowship this past sum- 
mer to do the global project 
in Thailand. 

See "SHOES" 
continued on page 2. 



Pafle2 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 4, 2007 



IfWS 



Oklahoma senator blocks gun bill 



Elizabeth Williamson 
Washington Post 

WASHINGTON - The 
nation's first new firearms 
law in more than a decade, 
born of the shooting deaths 
at Virginia Tech, is being 
blocked in the Senate by a 
single lawmaker who says it 
costs too much. 

The bill, which has 
passed the House on a voice 
vote, has bipartisan backing 
and the National Rifle 
Association's support. It is 
designed to improve the fed- 
eral system for checking 
gun buyers' mental health 
history in order to block 
purchases by those diag- 
nosed as mentally ill. 

The lawmaker who put 
the hold on the bill. Sen. 



Tom Coburn, R-Okla., con- 
tends that the bill would 
create "a pathway by which 
individuals can lose their 
Second Amendment rights 
but no pathway through 
which they can gain them 
back if they're stable." 

"I believe individual 
rights should be guaran- 
teed," Coburn said. 

He said he is even more 
concerned about the cost, 
which he contends would 
run to $2 billion over the 
next several years. Such leg- 
islation "is growing the gov- 
ernment without decreasing 
it somewhere else," he said. 

The hold is one of the 
Senate's most controversial 
procedural tactics. It allows 
a single lawmaker to block a 
vote on legislation. Coburn 
has holds on about 100 



pieces of legislation he 
opposes. Using dozens of 
amendments, he also has 
stalled a raft of spending 
bills that he says do not 
explain where the funding 
will come from for expanded 
veterans' health care, bridge 
upgrades and children's 
health care. 

The legislation came 
after mental health records 
indicated that the Virginia 
Tech shooter, student Seung 
Hui Cho, should have been 
flagged by the National 
Instant Check System. 
Legislators on both sides of 
the gun debate began deli- 
cate talks on fixing the sys- 
tem. 

Pro-gun Democratic 
Reps. John Dingell of 
Michigan, a former NRA 
board member, and Rick 



Boucher from near Virginia 
Tech's Blacksburg campus, 
teamed up with anti-gun 
New Yorkers Carolyn 
McCarthy, a congress- 
woman whose husband died 
in the Long Island Railroad 
shootings, and Sen. Charles 
Schumer to establish a "sys- 
tem that's better for gun 
owners and better for law 
enforcement," Dingell said 
at the time. 

Key support came from 
the NRA. which claims 4 
million members and has 
battled dozens of gun-con- 
trol bills in Congress. The 
group has lobbied for more 
money and a thorough 
scrubbing of the back- 
ground-check system, which 
the new measure would pro- 
vide. 



Requested funds allocated to two RSOs 

Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmricharcl@clarion.eclu 

jStudent 




CLARION, Oct. 1 - Student 
senate met on Oct. 1 for the 
weekly meeting to discuss 
allocations and announce a 
new statement that will be 



made prior to voting on RSO 
allocations in a meeting. 

Several motions of provid- 
ing money for Recognized 
Student Organizations 
(RSOs) were suggested. 

"When RSOs request 
money, they must fill out a 
specific form, meet certain 
deadlines and rules and 
after appropriations com- 
mittees go through it, it is 
then voted on during the 
actual senate meeting." said 
student senator Elizabeth 
Presutti. 

"Students involved in 
those RSOs are encouraged 
to attend the meetings to 
defend their case." 

Student senate deter- 
mined that it may become 



uncomfortable for an RSO 
representative to have to sit 
through the voting process 
involving that organization. 
In response to this issue, the 
senate decided that before 
any voting is to occur, a 
statement will be issued 
informing anyone repre- 
senting an organization that 
they are allowed to leave the 
room during the voting 
process. 

That evening, three 
RSOs were voted upon. A 
request of $679 for the 
America Marketing 

Association was approved, 
as was a request for $1,630 
from the Association of 
Graduate Business 

Students. A request for 



$1,018 from the Financial 
Management Association 
was denied. 

Organizations on cam- 
pus that were able or unable 
to become RSOs were also 
discussed. Several organi- 
zations currently have 
frozen accounts because 
they lack the proper paper- 
work and application 
processes necessary to 
become RSOs. 

Also, the issue was 
raised as to whether or not 
organizations such as 
WCUC and University 
Theatre are technically con- 
sidered RSOs. There was no 
conclusion at this time. 



"PLCB" continued 
from front page. 

According to informa- 
tion given by Kara Vickery, 
the Office Manager of 
Reinhard Villages, 

"Conduct, which infringes 
upon the rights of others to 
a quiet, orderly living envi- 
ronment is not acceptable 
under any circumstances 
and is expressly prohibited 
at Reinhard Villages. Open 



containers of alcohol are not 
permitted in the hallways, 
breezeways or other public 
areas of the Community. 
Common source alcoholic 
containers in excess of three 
gallons are also prohibited 
along with the sale of alco- 
hol. We reserve the right to 
confiscate any alcohol that 
is present in the 
Community in a manner 
that violates these Rules 
and Regulations and/or local 
and federal laws." 



Furthermore the infor- 
mation provided by Vickery 
said "All residents must be 
in full compliance with 
local, state and federal laws, 
and regulations in accor- 
dance with these rules and 
regulations." 

According to 

Pennsylvania law, any 
detectable alcohol on a 
minor's breath is sufficient 
to sustain a charge of under- 
age drinking. 

The PLCB is an inde- 



pendent government 

agency, established in 1933 
in conjunction with the 
repeal of prohibition. The 
agency manages the sale, 
storage, transportation and 
manufacture of wine, spirits 
and brewed beverages in the 
Commonwealth. The PLCB 
is also responsible for liquor 
distribution and education 
regarding the harmful 
effects of alcohol consump- 
tion. 



"SHOES" continued 
from front page. 

Martin said they decided to 
go without shoes, because 
friends of theirs have done 
something similar to this 
last year at the University 
of New Mexico. 

"Anyone is welcome to join 
in, as we are going one 
month, so around Oct. 10 we 
will have reached our goal," 
said Martin. "There are sev- 
eral other students who just 
spread the word and bring 
attention to the fact there 
are a few who do not wear 
shoes." 

As a combined effort to 
raise money and awareness 
Martin and Gutherie said 
they "want people to start 
looking past what is just 
going inside the headline 
news stories and see there is 
so much more to the coun- 
tries in the world." 

Interested inviduals can 
contact Martin by e-mail to 
donate to the cause at 
ozgal05@yahoo.com. 

Martin said "We want 
people to hear of Burma and 
know how bad the govern- 
ment treats its entire people 
especially the Karen Tribe. 
We want people to be aware 
of the injustice being done to 
ethnic group based on the 
fact of their ethnicity." 

The Karen Tribe is an 
ethic group that lives in the 
hills of Burma and 



Thailand. They are of a 
lower class and do not 
receive adequate education. 

"In the past several 
years the Thai government 
has given these people only 
so much land to live on 
towards the boarder of 
Thailand and Burma. The 
problem has become that 
their population is growing, 
forcing them to give up 
farming land and as a result 
they have less food," Martin 
said. 

According to Martin, 
"The Karen living in Burma 
are fighting against the gov- 
ernment and have been ever 
since World War II ... 
because of this constant fear 
of the government, those 
being oppressed are fleeing 
to Thailand." 

Near the Thailand and 
Burma border rests refugee 
camps. Mae Sot Thailand is 
a refugee on the border that 
is two miles in distance mile 
and holds over 50,000 
refugees. 

"The Thai government 
has granted these people 
this land to live on, but they 
can not leave without the 
proper paper work which 
costs a lot of money Money 
people who are fleeing for 
their lives do not have," 
Martin said. 

Martin described The 
Agape Children's home like 
a boarding school. The 
founder is a pastor that 



brings in children from 
Karen famihes in Thailand. 
Karen Children are children 
born with the ethnicity of 
the Karen Tribe in Burma 
or Thailand. The families 
can not afford to send their 
kids to school, so he pays for 
each child's schooling, uni- 
form, books and all the costs 
to house them for nine 
months of the year. Martin 
said that the pastor travels 
back and forth to the fami- 



lies in the hills to "encour- 
age them and to start small 
village churches for the peo- 
ple while looking after 120 
children." 

Martin and Gutherie 
said they "have hopes that 
Clarion University students 
will see how much they have 
by being here and getting an 
education while there are so 
many people in this world 
who fear for their lives and 
live day by day." 



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The Qaricn Call provides a synopsis of all mm- 
inal investigations as conducted by Clarion 
University Public Safety for the month of 
September/October 2007. All information can be 
accessed on the Public Safety Web page, 
http7/www.clarion.edu/admin/publicsafety/loca' 
tion.8htmL 

■ Sept. 28, at 12:25 a.m., Alex DituUio, 20, of 
McMurry, Pa., was cited for underage consumption and 
public drunkenness in Wilkinson Hall. 

■ Sept. 28, at 11:50 p.m., Jesse Miller, 19, of Altoona, 
Pa., was cited for underage consumption and public 
drunkenness after University Police found Miller 
passed on on the floor of Given Hall. 

■ Sept. 28, at 3:il a.m., Michael Gearhard, 18, of 
Murrysville, Pa., was cirted for underage consumption 
after police were called about a disturbance in Lot 5, 

■ Sept. 27, at 11:46 p.m., Andrew Linden, 19, of 
Brockport, Pa., was cited for disorderly conduct, public 
drunkenness, and underage consumption after 
University Police were called to Lot 3 for a fight. 

■ Sept. 27, at 12:45 a.m., University Police were called 
about a hit and run that took place in parking lot 3. 
The incident is under investigation. 

■ Sept. 27, at 10:50 a.m., Joseph Pettine, 21, was 
arrested on a warrant issued by Magistrate Quin for 
failing to return library materials to the public library 
on Main Street in Clarion. 

■ Sept. 26, at 11:30 p.m., Matthew Huber, 20, had 
charges filed against him by University Police after 
stealing a university owned Rigtt. ' i !,.;,, 

■ Sept. 25, at 11:21 p.m., Vanessa Eozzo, 18, of St. 
Marys, Pa., was cited for underage consumption in 
Nair Hall. 

■ Sept. 25, at iriO p.m., Lacey Lichvar, 23, of 
Clearville, Pa., was cited for possession of marijuana 
and drug paraphenalia. 

■ Sept. 25, at 11:21 p.m., Jamie Richard, 19, was cited 
for underage consumption in Nair Hall. 

■ Sept. 25, at 11:21 p.m., Jonathan Hedrick, 18, was 
cited for drinking in Nair Hall. 

■ Sept. 25, at 2:50 p.m., a student reported damage to 
a car while it was parked in parking lot 3. 

■ Sept. 21. at 6:22 p.m., Matthew Mainhart, 21, of 
Kitanning, Pa., was cited for disorderly conduct for 
holding a cardboard poster with obscene words and 
charicatures of naked female breasts while riding in a 
vehicle, after a women and her two small children 
reported seeing Mainhart in this act. 

■ Sept. 11, at 11:48 p.m., Christopher Helsel, of 
Altoona, Pa., was cited for underage consumption and 
posessing prohibited and offensive weapons, when he 
was found to be intoxicated and in possession of brass 
knuckles and an expandable baton. 

■ Sept. 10, at 8:18 p.m., Jonathan Hickey, 18, of Bethel 
Park, Pa., was observed urinating on the side of Becht 
Hall and was cited for disorderly conduct and underage 
consumption. 

■ Sept. 5, at 1:55 p.m., John Evans, 22, of Clarion, Pa., 
was arrested by Public Safety on an arrest warrant 
issued by Magistrate Quinn on charges filed by the Pa. 
State Police pertaining to the posession and delivery of 
a controlled substance. 

■ Sept. 5, at 8:49 a.m., Jason Brokenbek, 22, of 
Bridgeville, Pa was arrested by Public Safety on an 
arrest warrant issued by Magistrate Quinn on charges 
filed by the Pa. State Police pertaining to the posession 
and delivery of a controlled substance. 

■ Sept. 5, at 3 p.m.. University Police recieved a report 
of obscene phone calls that were being received by a 
Wilkinson Hall resident. 

■ Sept. 3, at 1:17 a.m., Racquelle Davis, 19, of Clarion 
Pa., was cited for underage drinking in Reinhard 
Villages. 

■ Sept. 1, at 5:23 p.m., an act of vandalism to a vehi- 
cle parked at Grouse Field Lane in Reinhard Villages 
was reported to University Police. This incident is 
under invesigation. 



Page 3 



Tiffi CLAiUON CALL 



October 4, 2007 



Ifiiin 



Imagine a day without feminism 




Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_saclesmond@clarlon.edu 

Women, imagine a day 
at Clarion with me (men, 
imagine a day for your girl- 
friend or sister or other 
female in your life). 

You wake up only ten 
minutes before your first 
class, so you decide to throw 
on some sweats and forget 
about make-up. Running to 
your Human Sexuality 
class, you run into a friend. 
She asks you to meet ner at 
the Loomis for lunch. 

After class, you head to 
the bookstore to pick up 
posterboard for a project. 
You use the credit card you 
got in the mail to pay for it. 

Entering your elemen- 
tary education class, you 
begin talking to a classmate. 
He tells you that he was 
offered a job teaching second 
grade next year. 

Your last class of the day is 
cancelled because your pro- 
fessor went into labor last 
night. With your free time, 
you go to see your advisor to 
discuss major options. You 
decide you might want to do 
something in math o;b,. sci- 



ence. 

At the Loomis, your 
friend confides in you that 
she was sexually abused 
over the weekend. You sug- 
gest that she goes to PAS- 
SAGES for help. 

After lunch, you head 
back to your apartment. You 
make a post on the discus- 
sion board for your women's 
studies class then read a few 
articles from the latest issue 
of Cosmo. Later that night, 
you head out to meet your 
friends for a movie. 



Did any of that seem 
abnormal? Any combination 
of those events could hap- 
pen on any day today. 

Only 40 years ago, 
though, that day would have 
never happened in any com- 
bination of events. 

Walking around with no 
make-up was not acceptable 
for women. They wouldn't 
have been able to partici- 
pate in a human sexuality 
class, if one was even 
offered. 

Women were not given 
credit records, so they 
wouldn't have a credit card 
,il\ their own.n^me. 



Often, women were 
demoted or fired if they 
became pregnant. No 
chance of a canceled class 
for pregnancy. There would- 
n't be very many major 
options to discuss because 
women typically majored in 
English, education or home 
economics. 

Women wouldn't be very 
willing to open-up about a 
sexual experience, especial- 
ly if it was abusive. 
Programs like PASSAGES 
didn't exist to help women 
in those situations. 

A female couldn't get an 
apartment on her own; 
women's studies classes 
were rare: Cosmo didn't run 
the same kind of sexually 
themed articles it does 
today; and women weren't 
allowed out after nine or 10 
p.m. 

This all relates to men, 
too. They typically did not 
teach elementary school. It 
was considered unnatural. 
So, an elementary education 
class would not include both 
sexes. 

Parties would not be 
filled with women ready to 
"hook up." Dating would be 
an entirely different experi- 
ence and men were expected 
to go "steady" with a girl 
much earlier in life. 

Many other factors con- 
tributed to the way of life 40 
years ago, of course. Still, 
many ways of thinking and 
living were determined by a 
person's sex. Life was very 
different for everyone. 

Through my women's 
studies class, I've been able 



to think about feminist 
issues on a much deeper 
level than I ever had before. 

From the start, I 
learned that it's not a con- 
cept that simply involves 
bra-burning or hating men. 

It's a movement to end 
to androcentric thinking 
(revolving around men). 

Feminism often carries 
such a negative connotation 
that people roll their eyes 
and scoff at the idea. But, 
simply imagine what life 
would be hke without the 
years of work feminists put 
in to change the way we live. 

I encourage you to aban- 
don your preconceived 
notions and consider life 
before feminist movements. 
Which would you prefer? 

I certainly don't even 
want to imagine life at that 
time. I enjoy the freedoms I 
have. 

Choosing whichever 
major I like, going out unac- 
companied, using my credit 
card and knowing there are 
resources for me if I get in 
trouble. Most of the times 
we don't consider simple 
things like these freedoms. 
They've always been options 
in our lives. 

If I could thank the 
female leaders who allowed 
us to have these freedoms 
and lead to the world we 
have now, I would. I am for- 
ever grateful to them. 



The author is a junior mass 
media arts & journalism 
major and Features Editor 
of The Call. 



" A game of 'Rusiilan roulette 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

s_zhause@clarion.edu 




Conservative talk slime, 
or I mean talk show host 
Rush Limbaugh is up to his 
usual attention seeking 
tricks again. This time he 
referred to Iraqi War veter- 
ans who return home from 
active duty and criticize the 
war in Iraq as "phony sol- 
diers" on his morning talk 
show. God bless America. 
It's about time someone 
called out those cowards. 
Anyone who opposes the 
war that has been over 
there must obviously be a 
fake, which must mean that 
my friends and family mem- 
bers that have come back 
from Iraq and Middle East 
must be fake. Here I 
thought they were serving 
their country and all along 
they were just faking the 
whole damn thing. Well that 
really steams my clams. I'm 
going to have a talk with 
them to see just how they 
pulled that one off because 
they sure did fool a lot of 
people. 

But thankfully it did not 
take the Democrats long to 
jump in front of the cameras 
for this twelve round bout of 
complete ignorance. Leading 
the pack this time for the 
Democrats, out of the blue 
corner, weighing in at about 
the same weight as any has 
been presidential candidate, 



John "Joke of the Month" 
Kerry. And his opponent, out 
of the red corner, weighing 
in between 270 and 400 
pounds (depending on his 
Oxycontin intake) , Rush 
"The Rotund Rambler" 
Limbaugh. 

Kerry had some pretty 
harsh words for Limbaugh, 
referring to Limbaugh as an 
"embarrassment to his 
party." Well if anyone is an 
expert in embarrassing 
their own party, it's John 
Kerry. Earlier this year, 
Kerry, in his ultimate wis- 
dom and comedic genius had 
the following joke to say 
about college students and 
the Iraq War: (before you 
read it, you better buckle 
your seat belt, it's a real 
knee slapper) "You know, 
education, if you make the 
most of it, you study hard, 
you do your homework and 
you make an effort to be 
smart, you can do well. And 
if you don't, you get stuck in 
Iraq." Way to go John, you 
make being a Support the 
Troops Democrat much easi- 
er after belting out that 
kind of hilarity. But, he did 
retract the statement and 
referred to it as a botched 
joke. Oh rats, and it was so 
funny, imagine what it 
would have sounded like if 
he would have actually said 
it right the first time, we 
would probably all still be 
laughing. Maybe we would 
have laughed ourselves 
right out of Iraq, wouldn't 
that have been nice? 

Between "being stuck in 
Iraq" and "phony soldiers," I 
do not know where to turn, 
so I will continue to talk 
about Rush Limbaugh. This 
recent "phony soldier" 
remark by Newt Gingrich's 
former massage therapist, 
Limbaugh, really helped the 



Democrats out after their 
recent sparring match with 
Republicans over the New 
York Times "General Betray 
Us" ad, which referred to 
General George Petraeus. 
General Petraeus, who had 
just spent several months in 
Iraq with some non-phony 
soldiers analyzing the war, 
just gave his Iraq report to 
congressional and senatori- 
al committees a couple of 
weeks ago, arguing in favor 
of the troop surge, as well as 
the progress that has been 
made in Iraq. Top 
Republicans called the 
Moveon.org ad, targeting 
the general "shameful" and 
a "disgrace to our national 
integrity" 

Okay, that's it, I cannot 
take this much longer I feel 
hke I just ate a big scat 
sandwich and washed it 
down with a glass of six day 
old chewing tobacco spit. 
Ads like this run all of the 
time from both sides. 
During the political season, 
politicians run smear ads 
against their opponents' 
campaign every minute of 
the day, with far worse 
phrases and slogans. Some 
of them, whether supported 
by Rush or Kerry fans, have 
truth behind them and some 
do not. 

Rush Limbaugh, as Al 
Franken put it, is a "big fat 
idiot." He embodies every- 
thing sick and disgusting in 
humanity He makes claims 
like all drug addicts should 
all be forced to live on their 
own island so that they 
could not bother anyone 
else, but then got himself 
busted taking more than 
nine times the regularly 
prescribed dose of 
Oxycontin at a time. He also 
claimed that Christian val- 
ues were his driving force in 



life, but has been divorced 
three times, as well as was 
busted with an entire bottle 
of a generic unprescribed 
Viagra while not being mar- 
ried, which leads me to 
believe old Rompin' Rush 
might have been up to some 
naughty sinning on his 
vacation. Also, the worst 
quality of Limbaugh, 
besides his hypocrisy, is his 
outright lack of integrity or 
respect for anyone else 
besides himself. He is and 
has been praying that 
Hillary Clinton gets voted 
president so that his ratings 
pick up and he is a house- 
hold name again like he was 
when Slick Willie was our 
head of state... no pun 
intended. Rush is a shock 
jock who wants attention, 
and he is getting it, but it 
only comes in spurts. He 
will need a Democrat presi- 
dent so that he has some- 
thing to complain about 
besides him and Bill 
O'Reilly's recently exposed 
love triangle with Senator 
Larry Craig. Who would 
have known that the three 
of them really know what 
love is? 

John Kerry, on the other 
hand, is a lousy representa- 
tive of the Democratic party 
who lost his backbone after 
he said something moder- 
ately controversial and was 
called on it. He held his 
ground for about as long as I 
can hold my breath. The 
point is that he did not have 
the guts to stand by what he 
said, and that is the prob- 
lem of the Democratic party 
as a whole. They need their 
backbone restored and they 
need to stop letting John 
Kerry talk at all. I realize 
that this is the second week 
I have harped about John 
Kerry, but he just has to 



Editorial. Lrltrrs to Hie Editor id h\\ on You 



THE CLARION CALL 

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im 



accept his role as a senator, 
nothing more, nothing less. 
U.S. Senator is a fine posi- 
tion to have in government, 
so please be happy with 
that. I commend his voting 
record, and am not a "flip 
flop" bandwagon John Kerry 
hater, but I think that he 
just needs to know his lim- 
its. Him and "Mother 
Teresa" Heinz Kerry should 
stick to windsurfing and 
ketchup bottling, two very 
important jobs in our socie- 
ty 

The job of our govern- 
ment is not to govern, or 
seek social and economic 
justice, it is to make the 
other side look terrible. How 
are they going to do their 
jobs if they don't start know- 
ing which side of the aisle to 
agree with? Come on, this 
two party system has its 
flaws, but can't we just 
agree to start mudslinging 
with some compassion and 
integrity? 



FREE 

PRACTICE 

LSAT 



Thinking about law 
school? 



A critical determinant 

to getting into law 

school is your LSAT 

perfomance. 



There will be a free 

practice LSAT on 

Saturday, October 13 

at 8:30 a.m. in room 

118 Founders Hall. 



Contact Dr. Sweet 
by October 11 

bsweet@clarion.edu 
393-2205 



.,.^ ..^^,JJ■^aZl£^'^msa^^r.^-^^ 



lAmi 



^mmsmmmi^ 



msL^Uik^tm 



i^^m^^ 



t^lBMHi 



Page 4 



I^ CLARION (!A1J. 



'« 






Feitms 



October 4. 2007 j October 4. 2007 



T1ffiCLAI| fQ p(^ 



Page 5 



Contracting the ''kissing disease/' avoiding tlie iiiness 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

8._gsbandzuh@clarion.eclu 

Rozlynd Vares was born 
and raised on the island of 
Hawaii. Upon graduating 
from Kemehameha High 
School, Vares and her 
boyfriend discovered 

Clarion University for the 
first time. 

"I always wanted to go 
to school on the east coast," 
she said. "My boyfriend 
came here to wrestle so I 
decided to attend Clarion 
with him." 

Vares is a senior major- 
ing in business and econom- 
ics. She is also involved with 
several organizations and 
clubs on campus. She is a 
member of student senate, 
president of the Political 
Economics Club, vice-presi- 
dent of the Real Estate 
Association and a member 
of the President's 
Commission on the Status of 
Women. She also works as a 
teaching assistant in the 
Economics Department. 

In Hawaii, she co-owns 
her father's contracting 



company. 

Due to her hard work 
and dedication to her school- 
work, she was acknowl- 
edged with two awards. She 
is attending Clarion 
University on a full scholar- 
ship from Bishop Estate, 
located in Hawaii. She also 
received the Charles R 
Leech Scholarship and she 
is an undergraduate 
research scholar. 

Vares also participates 
in relief efforts. 

Next month, on Oct. 22- 
25, she has organized a trip 
to New Orleans through the 
Political Economics Club. So 
far there are about 40 peo- 
ple attending. They are 
holding fundraisers and col- 
lecting sponsorships to help 
pay for the trip. 

During their time in 
New Orleans, the entire 
group will be working 
through an organization 
called St. Bernard Parish. 
Their jobs will require them 
to first demolish the homes 
and then rebuild as many 
homes as they can in the 
three days they are there. 

"We are still more than 
willing to take on more peo- 



ple, the more the better," 
she said. "More homes will 
be built if we have more peo- 
ple to build them." 

Vares said she loves 
Clarion University. 

"The University of 
Hawaii was a oad atmos- 
phere for me. I never really 
had the chance to bond with 
any of my professors there 
due to the fact that the 
school was so big," she said. 
"Here at Clarion University 
the professors of business 
and economics are amaz- 
ing. 

Despite how she feels 
about all of the positive 
things at Clarion, she feels 
that she does not fit in with 
all of the cultures. 

"My culture is sort of in 
the minority here. There are 
not that many people here 
who are from my culture," 
she said. 

Since she is a family-ori- 
ented person, it's also hard 
for her to be so far away 
from home. 

Her hobbies include 
reading, going to the Pacific 
Ocean, jet skiing and play- 
ing with all kinds of dogs. 
Her favorite pastime is lay 







ing around in the sand at 
Waimanalo beach. 

As for the difference in 
climate between here and 
Hawaii, she said, "I love the 
climate here. It is fun to get 
all dressed up in all of those 
warm clothes. It is nice to 



actually wear something 
else than a tank top and 
shorts every single day dur- 
ing the week." 

She also said she loves 
the change of seasons 
because she is used to sun- 
shine and 80 degree weath- 



er every day in Hawaii. 

After graduating from 
Clarion University, Vares 
plans on returning to 
Hawaii where she wants to 
attend law school and 
attend graduate programs 
in economics. 



PCSW w orks towards equality Iask doctor eagle 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 



The President's 

Commission on the Status of 
Women was formed in 1983 
as a subcommittee of the 
Affirmative Action 

Committee. With a state 
mandate, it was made a 
commission in 1889. 

As a way to address 
issues concerning women on 
campus, the group worked 
to develop programs that 
would help promote equality 
for all women on campus. 
They have been involved in 
hiring practices and work- 
ing conditions on campus 
and have branched out into 
the community through 
work with rape victims. 

"We have survived and 
stayed strong because we 
have a vision of what an 
equitable campus should 
look like and have been will- 
ing to take steps to make 
this happen," said Dr. 
Jeanne Slattery, a psycholo- 
gy professor and member of 
the PCSW. 

Through their work, 
many vital establishments 
on campus are available for 
women. Two of the largest 
are the Women's Studies 
Department and SAFE. 
They also had a part in 
starting the Rape 
Aggression Defense System 
(RADS, now run by Public 



Safety), the Faculty 
Mentoring Program (now 
run by Faculty Affairs) and 
Students Together Against 
Rape (STAR). 

Because of their efforts 
with these programs, the 
PCSW has won two Social 
Equity Awards. 

Today, the group spon- 
sors activities like speakers 
and presentations. This 
year they are co- sponsoring 
speakers Farooka Guahari, 
an Afghan woman, and Eve 
Ensler, the author of "The 
Vagina Monologues" (both 
with the Martin Luther 
King, Jr. Committee). 

They also work with the 
Office of Social Equity for 
Equity Week and are still 
involved in STAR. 

Each year, they do a 
project. Last year's project 
centered around women's 
health. This year it is about 
women in a global context. 

"Now that the campus is 
under control, [I'd like to see 
us] look beyond to world- 
wide issues," said Dr. 
Jocelynn Smrekar, a educa- 
tion professor and member 
of the PCSW. 

They will be focusing on 
countries that are areas of 
conflict and where women's 
rights are in danger. 

Besides speakers, the 
group also financially sup- 
ports students doing gender- 
related research. 

At the end of September, 
they held their annual 



retreat at the Clarion House 
Bed and Breakfast. They 
hold this at the beginning of 
each year to brainstorm 
activities for the year, wel- 
come new members and 
reflect on women's issues. 

Janice Gruenwald, Dr. 
Jeanne Slattery and Fatima 
Hashmi participated in a 
panel called "Challenges to 
Women in the 2l8t 
Century." Hashmi discussed 
her experiences living in 
Pakistan. 

"I was pleasantly sur- 
prised that my presentation 
had a deep impact on every- 
one there. I didn't expect it 
to be so well received," 
Hashmi said. 

Members of the group 
will also be attending the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education 
(PASSHE) Women's 

Constortium's Annual 

Conference. It is being held 
at Bloomsburg University at 
the end of the month. The 
theme is "Generations of 
Women Moving History 
Forward." 

Although the group is 
currently composed of about 
30 faculty members, they 
released a call for member- 
ship at the beginning of the 
fall semester. Four students 
applied by submitting a 200- 
250 word essay describing 
why they want to be in the 
group and what they feel 
they could contribute. 

At the group's monthly 



Organization 
Spotlight 





meeting yesterday, they 
voted on accepting the stu- 
dent members. Hashmi, 
Rozlynd Vares, Elinore 
Hooven and Kerri 
Fesenmyer were approved 
for membership. 

"Joining the PCSW will 
equip me the tools to 
address women issues, par- 
ticularly those in the work- 
ing environment back home, 
which I am soon joining," 
said Hashmi. "My experi- 
ences as a women and chil- 
dren's rights advocate in 
Pakistan have made me 
more aware of the many 
opportunities women have 
in this part of the world and 
I hope to benefit from it." 

Members of the group 
join for many different rea- 
sons, ranging from wanting 
to make a difference to look- 
ing for support. 

"As a woman in a 
department that is predomi- 
nately male, I needed to go 
outside to have female inter- 
action," said Dr. Valerie 
Bennett, a biology professor. 
"I feel like I'm making a dif- 
ference on campus." 




D^r Dr. Eagle, 



My friend has been struggling with drug and alcohol 
issues. She was attending Alcoholics Anonymous at 
home over the summer, which helped her a lot. Now that 
we're back in school, I'm afraid she's going to cave to 
peer pressure and revert back to old habits of excessive 
partying. Any suggestions? 

Signed, 

Concerned Friend 



Dear Concerned Friend, 



Young people face many challenges, pressures, and 
stressors. Drugs and alcohol may seem to provide a tem- 
porary escape from daily life, but, numbing or "obhvion 
through the bottle" only creates more problems. 
Although a necessary first step is the desire to change 

I one's behavior and attitudes. Because addiction is a dis- 
ease, outside help is often necessary Your friend is 
lucky to have you in her corner and Alcoholics 
Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous are great 
resources. 

There are local chapters of Alcoholics Anonymous 
(AA) and Narcotics Anonymous (NA) that meet on cam- 
pus. Since your friend has had experience and success 
with this program, perhaps she will be glad to know 
there are groups here to help her too. Both AA and NA 
hold open meetings (anyone may attend) weekly from 8- 
9 p.m. on Wednesdays and Thursdays, respectively, in 
the basement of Hart Chapel. 

Dr. Eagle is written by Valerie Wonderling of the Keeling 

Health Center. For more information or to suggest a topic, 

e-mail her at s_vjwonderli@clarion.edu. 






ADVISING mFORMANT 

Have questions about making the most of your education at Clarion-? 
We 11 imd the answers! 



When do I register? Any suggestions for getting through the 
scheduling process? 

Registering starts Oct. 15. To find out when you 
register, go into Web for Students through your iClarion 
" portal. Click the Registration tab, then Registration 
Status. On this screen, you will find the date and time 
that you register. 

When you begin scheduling, be sure to have an idea 
what classes you want to take. Also have back-ups in 
case your first-choice classes are full. If you haven't met 
your advisor, make an appointment with him or her 
you schedule. They can help you decide what classes you 
-' and make sure you're on the right track. 

Advising Informant is a service of Clarion University's Advising Office. If you have 
any questions you would like answered, e-mail the office staff at advising@clarion.edu. 



Rebuilding New Orleans 




Susan Campbell 
The Hartford Courant 

In and around New 
Orleans, there is a whole 
army of faceless names like 
Rosita Thomas, whose 
wrecked house on Piety 
street was marked this 
spring as a public nuisance 
and blighted property. 

Did she even see the 
sign? Did she make her 
April 23rd hearing? (And 
did the person hanging the 
sign take into account that 
Thomas didn't cause the 
blight, the levee break did?) 

Where is Rosita Thomas 
now, and does she ever 
think of her little house on 
Piety? 

You could go to New 



Orleans and never get your 
questions answered. A 
group from the Greater 
Hartford campus of 
University of Connecticut 
(UConn) volunteered with 
Habitat for Humanity in 
New Orleans in late May. 
Thomas Craemer, assistant 
professor of public policy, 
went as a faculty sponsor. 

They planned to build 
three-bedroom houses in the 
Upper Ninth Ward, in the 
eastern part of the city. 
Many of the UConn group 
are public policy graduate 
students. Some of them had 
already studied the conun- 
drum that is the Crescent 
City, but that was from afar. 
The post-Katrina Gulf Coast 
is a perfect storm of weath- 
er, shoddy levees and gov- 



ernmental miscues. 

And a visit there is preg- 
nant with teachable 
moments. A city is decimat- 
ed, and leaders don't seem 
to know what to do about it. 
Rebuild? Rebuild into what? 
The new New Orleans can 
never be the same New 
Orleans, but would you 
want it to be? And where do 
you begin, asks Ryan Tully, 
a graduate student who 
helped coordinate the trip. 

The Connecticut volun- 
teers saw a shocking lack of 
government 
resources — save for canned 
water from FEMA— but bee- 
hives of volunteers. 

See "NEW 

ORLEANS" continued 
on page 5. 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 

Clarion students should 
be wary the next time they 
kiss their significant other 
because it may land them 
with a nasty cold or worse. 

Yes, it's that time of year 
again. Not football season, 
cold season. This year is no 
different than any other 
year before. A majority of 
Clarion students are suffer- 
ing the effects of the "kiss- 
ing disease." 

The technical name for 
the kissing disease is 
mononucleosis, or mono for 
short. Mono is a viral dis- 
ease that affects many parts 
of your body, most notably 
the respiratory system, liver 
and spleen. It is nicknamed 
the kissing disease because 
one of the main ways to 
become infected with the 
virus is the exchange of sali- 
va, which could be attained 



through kissing, sharing 
food or drinks or even being 
coughed on by accident. 

Darlene Hnrtlc. a regis- 
tered nurse who works in 
health promotions and pro- 
grams at the Keeling Health 
Center, said that the 
chances of contracting mono 
are very high for students, 
considering that the risk of 
catching the illness increas- 
es greatly with lack of sleep 
and an unhealthy diet. 

Hartle said that there 
aren't an unusual number of 
people with mono this year, 
but there have been many 
cases from the beginning of 
the semester. She also said 
that most people are 
immune to mono by the age 
of 30, because by that time 
most people have had it in 
one form or another. 

Some common signs of 
mono are fever, sore throat, 
appetite loss, headache and 
general aching. These signs 
could be misleading and 
make a student to believe 



that one just has a common 
cold or fever. 

If not treated properly, 
mono could have significant- 
ly more damaging effects, 
including an enlarged 
spleen and liver. 

The spleen grows 
because it tries to produce 
more white blood cells to 
fight off the cold. If one 
plays a contact sport with 
an enlarged spleen, it could 
be easily ruptured, landing 
him or her in the emergency 
room. 

If the liver enlarges and 
a heavy amount of alcohol is 
consumed, it could also 
cause serious complications. 
In very rare cases, the lungs 
or heart become attacked by 
the virus as well, which 
could prove to be fatal. 

Tests for mono are typi- 
cally done by taking blood, 
usually through finger 
pricks. The span of disease 
can last from 10 days up to 
six months. 

So what are the best 



way.s to I'igfit otT mono'.' 
Since mono is a viral dis- 
ease, there is no medication 
that can he taken to cure it. 
This doesn't mean it's com- 
pletely untreatable, though. 
"Mono is a self limiting 
disease." said Hartle. "This 
means that if you are tired, 
than you must rest. If you 
have a sore 



water or take cough medi- 
cine. You have to treat the 
.symptoms that you have." 

Also, healthy foods and 
vitamins are important and 
recommended. 

"Diet is the most impor- 
tant," said Hartle. 

What are the best ways 
to avoid mono all together? 
The answei 



Avoid physical contact with 
someone you know has 
mono, and take care of your- 
s(>li' l)\ getting adequate 
sleep and eating right. 
These thnigs may be hard 
for fi college student to do, 
hut important measures 
must be taken in order to 
avoid contracting mono. 




Register collaborates original music with poetry 



i 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nawatts©clarion.edu 

Dr. Brent Register, a 
music professor, collaborat- 
ed with John Digby, an 
artist, for the newly pub- 
lished book "Songs from the 
Chinese Poets." The book 
contains translated Chinese 
poetry, images and music 
composition. A CD of the 
music recordings features 
performances by Brent 
Register, oboe; Lisa 
Johnson, clarinet; and 
Bryan Register, tenor. 

Brent Register first met 
Digby at the National 
Colligate Foundatiojft in 



Philadelphia. Digby was 
known as a translator for 
Chinese poetry and artwork. 
Brent Register and Digby 
discussed their interests, 
which led to a collaboration 
with the music composition 
and Chinese poetry. 

Although they collabo- 
rated for the book, they both 
worked separately on their 
respective pieces. 

"He is not a musician 
and I am not a poet," Brent 
Register said. 

Brent Register worked 
on his composition for about 
a year. He used western 
style music for his composi- 
tion and was influenced by 
what was going on in his life 
at the time. ■ ... 




Dr. Brent Register (The Clarion Ca/(/Darla Kuma/) .aa**-.!! -.ri^u 



Johnson thought it had 
sounds from the "Three 
Penny Opera," which Brent 
Register was correcting at 
the time. Bryan Register 
thought it sounded like 
Francis Poulenc, which 
Brent Register performed in 
a recital. 

The series contains five 
movements, which is about 
eight minutes of music. 
Brent Register's favorite 
poem was by Li-Po titled 
"Night Thoughts," and was 
the first one he composed. 

The poem read, "Inching 
across my straw pallet the 
moon spreads a cold light so 
bright I think its frost. 
Settling back to sleep I pon- 
der home." 



Brent Register imag- 
ined the poem with the 
moon and the cold light to 
get inspired for the composi- 
tion. 

The piece will he per- 
formed on Nov. 4 at the 
National Collegiate Honors 
Council conference in 
Denver, Colo. Register and 
Digby will also do another 
collaboration and perform at 
the conference. 

"John was so pleased 
with the result that he 
wants to create another 
song cycle. I'm up for it," 
Brent Register said. "1 may 
use instruments other than 
the oboe, like clarinet and 
tenor, for the next set." 



"NEW ORLEANS" 
continued from page 4. 

As they started work— recy- 
cling a foundation into a 
patio, taking turns at a jack- 
hammer— they kept hearing 
horror stories about the 
nearby Lower Ninth. 

So on their day off, they 
went exploring, and found 
shockingly little going on in 
the Lower Ninth, save for a 
community organization 
called Common Ground 



Collective. 

The Lower Ninth was 
hit hardest during the levee 
break, and subsequent 
competing policies haven't 
helped much, said Craemer. 
People there are working 
without city water or elec- 
tricity. Residents have had 
little luck getting those 
much-hated FEMA trailers. 
The"re hated, but they're 
something. Without homes 
to call their own. Lower 
Ninth residents have scat- 
tered. 



m*^^^^ 



Student Tina 

Harrington took a picture 
for her blog of a sign that 
said, in part, "Tourist, 
shame on you." 

"They get so angry if you 
drive through like you are 
on a tour bus," she said. "If 
you stop, they are so friend- 
ly, they want people to know 
what's going on with them. 
They will tell you their 
story. Everyone was still 
broken in the Lower Ninth." 

Craemer counted trail- 
ers, and found that the 



whiter the neighbors, the 
more official help they 
appeared to have received. 
Craemer's background is 
political psychology with a 
focus on American race rela- 
tions. Even without that 
background, the inequity 
"kind of hits you over the 
head," he said. He and the 
students decided they'd 
start gathering data. They'll 



present their findings Oct. 
4. 

Group members 

expressed their dismay, but 
Craemer, a German immi- 
grant, finds the lack of offi- 
cial activity— and the notion 
that the area can and 
should be abandoned— trou- 
bUng. 

"When Kennedy 

announced this nation 



would travel to the moon, 
people didn't think it was 
impossible," he said. "That's 
what attracted me to this 
country, its can-do spirit. 
"There's a problem, let's 
solve it.'" No one talked 
about abandoning New York 
after the terrorist attacks. 
No one would think of leav- 
ing behind Venice or the 
Netherlands. 



The Marines' pull-up challenge 





Look in next week's issue for the answer! 



The Marines held a pull-up challenge Sept. 27 in the Gemmell Student Complex. Students could 
win prizes by doing a certain number of pull-ups. Lt. Michael Conley of the Marines looks on as 
Mike Smalls, a freshman business management major, does a one-handed pull-up. (The Clarion 
Call/Shasta Kurtz) 





Last week: Sculpture outside of the 
Gemmell Student Complex. 



Page 6 



Hffi CLARION CALL 



October 4. 2007 



SiMiimtt 

Theatre Department opens season with "The Guys" 



October 4, 2007 



Tiffi CLA8I0N CALL 



Rachella Vollant-Barie 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ravollantb®clarion.edu 



The Clarion University 
Theatre Department hegins 
their season with a dramat- 
ic presentation of the play 
"The Guys" on Oct. 9. It is 
dedicated to the remem- 
brance of the tragic events 
of September 11. 2001 and 
also to raise funds for the 
fire departments of Clarion 
County. The theme of the 
Arts department for this 
season is "Connecting the 
Arts and the Community" 

"It is intense, personal 
writing. All of us have vivid 
memories of 9/11; this is an 



media in the days following 
the attack. 

The play originated 
through an actual interview 
by Anne Nelson (who is also 
the writer of the play) and 
the captain of a Brooklyn 
fire house, who lost eight of 
his men in the tragic events 
that occurred on September 
nth. 

The captain had to write 
the eulogies for each man 
who had died that day and 
recite these eulogies during 
a memorial service for the 
firefighters in his depart- 
ment who died in the tragic 
collapse of the Twin Towers. 
Anne Nelson (a journalist 
who specialized in inter- 
viewing victims of disasters) 
was implored to assist. 



extremely personal view, 

not the hype of the personal Because of her inspiration, 

loss," said Robert Levy, the Nelson was able to assist 



producer for this perform- 
ance. 

Through the perform- 
ance, the audience realizes 
that the firefighters were 
more than the heroes made 
known and portrayed by the 



the captain to rediscover the 
humanity, friendship and 
camaraderie to express in 
the eulogies 

Just nine days after 




house captain. Nick and 
Joan are the only two char- 
acters in the play. Nick will 
be played by senior Jesse 
Mcllvaine and Joan will be 
played by senior Drew Leigh 
Williams. This role is 
Mcllvaine's senior project. 

The play runs from Oct. 
9-13 at 8 p.m. in the 
Marwick-Boyd Little 



Clarion Fire and Hose 
Company, Shippenville-Elk 
VFD and the Strattanville 
VFD, local fire departments 
who are dependent on vol- 
unteers and fundraising 
efforts in order to protect 
us," said Levy. "On all other 
nights of the show, a Till- 
the-boot' campaign will be 
held for Corsica VFD, 



Theatre. Tickets cost $12 for Washington Twp Fire and 
the general public, $6 for Rescue, Knox VFD and 



Clarion University students 
(student IDs will be checked 
at the door) and $9 for chil- 
dren under 12. Although the 
play is suitable for all ages, 
it is not advised to be 



Brookville and Pine Creek 
VFD." 

Tickets for all perform- 
ances can be purchased at 
the Continuing Education 
office, as well as through the 



watched by small children, Performing Arts Web site 
because of the intense and by phone at (814) 393- 



Seniors Jesse Mcllvaine and Drew Leigh Williams are the only 
two actors in the University Theatre Department's showing of 
'The Guys. " (Courtesy of Newswire) 



assisting the captain write her experience into a play, 
the eulogies. Nelson turned These two characters 



are portrayed as Joan, the 
writer, and Nick, the fire- 



nature of the subject. 

Tickets for the opening 
night are $25. The proceeds 
will benefit various fire 
departments. Hor d'oeuvres 
will be served at 7 p.m. and 
the doors will open at 8 p.m. 

"With the opening night 
Benefit for Clarion County 
Heroes, we hope to raise a 
substantial amount for the 



ARTS. 

Also scheduled for this 
semester from the Theatre 
Department is "La Ronde," 
which is scheduled from 
Nov. 13-17 at 8 p.m. in the 
Little Theatre, and a Dance 
Concert on Dec. 6-7 in the 
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium 
at 8 p.m. 



Rodrigo y Gabriela rock out "Fusion Music" 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers@clarion.edu 




"Rodrigo y Gabriela" 
Rodrigo y Gabriela 
Rating: 5/5 



Latin harmonies and 
rhythms combined with the 
structure of rock is the 
"Fusion Music" style of the 
Dublin-based Mexican 

group Rodrigo y Gabriela. 

Their self-titled album, thrilling 



tribute to the style of music 
that Rodrigo y Gabriela 
love. The sound of a rock 
song played on an acoustic 
guitar provides an interest- 
ing combination of tranquil- 
ity and excitement. 

A more upbeat sound is 
conveyed to the listener in 
the song "Tamacun." This 
song comes across as more 
of a folk song than a rock 
song. The song is meant as a 
tribute to the famous 
Mexican eccentric, 

Tamacun. According to the 
band, Tamacuns message 
was to teach children to 
respect nature. 

The song "Diablo Rojo" 
was inspired by a roller- 
coaster called Red Devil, 
located in Copenhagen, 
Denmark. The fast-paced 
beat of the song mixes well 
with the rolling chords. As 
you are listening to this 
song, you actually feel as if 
you are taking part in a 
and tumultuous 




Revolutionary music 
mixer reieased oniine 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjdbuffone@clarion.edu 



which was released in 
October 2006, features orig- 
inal works as well as their 
own unique versions of rock 
songs such as "Stairway to 
Heaven" by Led Zepplin and 
"Orion" by Metallica. All of 
their songs showcase their 
enormous talents on the 
acoustic guitar. Four of the 
tracks from the album can 
be heard on Rodrigo y 
Gabriela's MySpace page. 

The first track that is 
available is "Orion." The 
reworking of this song is a 



rollercoaster ride. 

My favorite song of 
those featured on the 
group's MySpace page is 
their version of Led 
Zepplin's "Stairway to 
Heaven," Initially inspired 
by Stanley Jordan's inter- 
pretation of the classic song, 
Rodrigo y Gabriela's version 
is unique in its sound, yet 
still pays proper tribute to 
the original song. 

Rodrigo y Gabriela's 
eclectic mix of sounds on the 
acoustic guitar is most defi- 



nitely worth checking out. 
Of the songs I've heard, I 
have not found one that I 
did not thoroughly enjoy. 
The unique mix of folk, rock 
and Latin themes offers 
something for almost every 
type of music lover. The 
light and upbeat sounds are 
excellent as background 
music for studying or a 
casual get- together. 

The group, consisting of 
Rodrigo Sanchez and 
Gabriela Quintero, is in the 
midst of a very successful 
year. The success of their 
album has led to a nomina- 
tion for an MTV Leftfield 
"Woodie" award alongside 
the Klaxons, CSS and the 
Knife. 

Rodrigo y Gabriela has 
also recently broken into the 
Billboard Top 100 chart and 
hit number one for the first 
time on the World Albums 
chart. 

The duo is currently on 
tour and is performing in 
Philadelphia on Oct. 18. 
Tickets for the 8 p.m. show 
at the Electric Factory are 
$27. 




JamStudio.com 
Rating: 3/5 




For the millions of peo- 
ple like me who have a real 
passion for music but can't 
play a lick on any instru- 
ment, we finally have an 
outlet: Jamstudio.com 

A new and innovative 
Web site, Jamstudio.com 
allows professionals and 
amateurs alike to compose, 
mix and play back their own 
music. Not only is this new 
virtual tool ground-break- 
ing, it's also completely free. 

JamStudio.com creator, 
Dave Edwards, who is also 
an accomplished musician 
and software developer, 
generated this new concept 
in hope of giving people a 
chance to make CD worthy 
music without purchasing 
or even being able to play 
instruments. 

The "online music facto- 
ry" has a huge digital music 
library consisting of over 



40,000 musical phrases. The 
easy-to-use mixer lets users 
create songs by selecting 
and blending guitars, bass, 
drums and keyboard. 

The user chooses the 
rhythm, chords and tempo 
of the instruments selected 
to make a unique and per- 
sonalized sound. Users can 
save their newly created 
songs after they apply for 
their free membership to 
the Web site. 

JamStudio.com has 
already attracted thousands 
of registered members and 
is starting to make some 
noise in the online commu- 
nity. JamStudio is pulHng 
out all the stops in hope of 
becoming an online phenom- 
enon. 

The Web site's program- 



end of the year which will 
make the music even more 
realistic. 

Also coming soon is a 
contest feature which puts 
power into the user's hands. 
Members will listen to 
mixes posted by other mem- 
bers and will follow up by 
voting for their favorite. The 
site's "favorite song" will 
then be featured on the site 



mers have recently released for a period of time, thus 
a custom-made mixer made 
just for MySpace users to 
put on their personal pages. 
The most unifying and help- 
ful tool may be the forums 
feature. This aspect of the 
Web site allows every mem- 
ber to discuss specific sub- 
jects. Users can ask other 
members for advice about 
songs, share ideas, critique 
each other's works and dis- 
cuss new ideas for the Web 
site. The forums can just be 
used to introduce oneself 
and get to know fellow 
artists all around the world. 
The team at JamStudio 
is always adding new music 
styles as well as new fea- 
tures to better the website. 
There is a future plan of 
adding a voice recording ele- 
ment to the program by the 



giving free publicity to an 
artist's work. 

Other future attractions 
are video searches which 
will allow users to watch 
their favorite music videos, 
and a "favorite style" fea- 
ture which will utilize cur- 
rent musical hits to achieve 
the best possible sound for 
the artist's current work. 

JamStudio is a great 
opportunity for all aspiring 
artists who may not have 
the abilities or funds to pro- 
duce quality music that 
could put them in the music 
industry. The concept of the 
new program is too well put 
together to fail and can only 
get bigger from here on out. 
Look for JamStudio to be a 
household name in the near 
future. 



"Cavemen" hits an evolutionary dead end 



Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero will be performing in Philadelphia on Oct. 18 at the 
Electric Factory (Courtesy of BigHassle.com) 



Mary McNamara 
Los Angeles Times 



Well, the good news is 
we probably won't be sub- 
jected to a television show 
about the Verizon can-you- 
hear-me-now guy any time 
soon. Any fears that com- 
mercial-inspired comedies 
are the wave the future 
were put to rest by the dis- 
mal premiere of ABC's Geico 
Insurance spokesman- 



inspired "Cavemen" 

Tuesday night. 

The network wisely 
chose not to make the pre- 
miere episode of "Cavemen" 
available to critics before its 
airdate - in the hope , I sup- 
pose, that people might tune 
in for the sheer curiosity 
value. Certainly the show 
has received a fair amount 
of buzz since a preliminary 
pilot was floated, although 
not the desired buzz of an 
excited anticipatory audi- 



ence. More like the bristling 
buzz of an angry crowd 
heading over to the hard- 
ware store to see if the 
pitchforks and/or flaming 
brands were on sale. 

Over the last few 
months, many called the 
show racist - heaven knows 
why unless it was because 
the cavemen in question 



See "CAVEMEN' 
page 7. 




The CW's "Reaper" is a 
must see new fall show 



Page? 



The third Installment of the "Halo" 
trilogy has finally been released 



Joey Pettine 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmpettine®clarion.edu 




"Reaper" 

Creator: Tara Butters and 
Michele Fazekas 
Rating: 3.5/5 



It's that time of year 
again, fall, and for TV net- 
works across America that 
can mean only one thing: 
time to force a whole slew of 
new shows down the throat 
of the American public 
whether they want it or not. 

There are a lot of good 
new TV shows to choose 
from this year, and due to 
the worldwide success of 
last year's NBC breakaway 
hit "Heroes," one of the 
biggest trends this year is 
cashing in on the science fic- 
tion/supernatural TV show 
crowd. 

This year the American 
public can look forward to 
both NBC's "Heroes" and 
the Sci-Fi Channel's geek 
hit "Eureka" returning for 
their second seasons as well 



as the CW's own 

"Supernatural" returning 

for it's third season this 

Thursday. Not to mention 

NBC and the Sci-Fi Channel 

revamping old series into 

new nerd hits with the 

retelling of the 70's classics 

"The Bionic Woman" and 

"Flash Gordon." Add to this 

list NBC's new time travel 

drama, "Journeyman," 

ABC's crime dramady about 

a man who can bring the 

dead back to life, "Pushing 

Daisies," and even the Geico 

cavemen getting their own 

show in ABC's new sitcom, 

"Cavemen." After all these. 




Travis Lear 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s twlear@clarion,edu 



with his silly best friend 
Sock (Tyler Labine of 
2ge-t-her) and his work 
hours pining over the beau- 
tiful Andi (Missy Peregrym. 
who no one really knows but 
she's dating Ben 



you have more than enough Roethlisberger) 
supernatural sci-fi action 
than you can shake a dalek 
at. 

So with all these new 
nerdy delights to choose 
from, how should one go 
about biding their precious 
TV time? What supernatu- 
ral situation should 



one 

envelop themselves in? 
Well, my pick for this season 
is the CW's own "Reaper," 
Tuesdays at 9:00 p.m. fol- 
lowing "Beauty And The 
Geek." 

"Reaper" follows in the 
footsteps of such classic 
WB/UPN supernatural teen 
dramas as "Buffy The 
Vampire Slayer," "Angel," 
and "Smallville." The pilot 
of "Reaper" was directed by 
the infamous Kevin Smith 
("Clerks," "Dogma"). The 
show is about a hopeful 
loser college dropout Sam 
Oliver ( Bret Harrison of 
"Grounded For Life"), who 
spends his days hanging out 



And so Sam lives an 
uneventful life, not really 
understanding why his par- 
ents go so easy on his crappy 
life decisions, until one day 
his dad gives him the bad 
news. 

"We sold your soul to the 
devil." 

With the infamous Ray 
Wise ("Twin Peaks") playing 
Satan and charging Sam 
with the duty of bringing 
escaped souls back to Hell, 
the first of which he ends up 
procuring with a dust 
buster, "Reaper" is just plain 
fun. A gorgeous blend of silly 
"Ghostbuster'-esque come- 
dy with a few drops of 
drama here and there. 
Supplied with great acting, 
witty dialogue, and a plot so 
silly it has to be good, 
"Reaper" is a must see of the 
new Fall season. As a mat- 
ter of fact it's just one hell of 
a devilishly good time. 




"Halo 3" 
Bungle Studios 
Rating: 4.5/5 



The most eagerly antici- 
pated video game of 2007 
has finally arrived: "Halo 3." 
On September 25, the third 
installment of the acclaimed 
Bungie Studios trilogy hit 
the shelves. It is here peo- 
ple! 



to edit and post rhcir clips 
on Xbox Live. 

Another new addition is 
something called the 
"Forge." This mode allows 
gamers to move objects 
around with them to differ 
ent levels, and it also allows 
for spawning of vehicles and 
weapons. 

The online play is l)asi- 
cally thesatne. with upt(» l(i 
players in different multi- 
player modes, in over 1 1 dif- 
ferent game maps. Of 
course, the scenarios in 
multi-player is customiz- 
able, and up to four people 
are now able to play co-op at 
the same time. 

Now to the part that 
gamers have been dreaming 
of since the release of "Halo 
2." Gamers and "Halo" fans 
will be glad to know that 
"Halo 3" wraps up the trilo- 
gy nicely tying up lose ends 
and bringing the saga to an 
end. 

In the final installment, 
the player follows Master 
Chief and his struggles 




the N 

MetaCritic 
9() out ol 
Gameiiiforniei 



ar status. 

^ave the game 

I KH). while 

gave "Halo 



3 



a 9.7.") out of 10. 
Game wel)site l(!N said, 
"There's no first-pcM'son 
shooter on :i()0 that can 
equal 'Halo 3's' blend of ciii- 
I'matic action, adrenaline- 
pumping shootouts, and 
male- (and female)-bonding 
game play." while giving the 
game a 10 out of 10. 

Mainly the only com- 
plaint of the game is the 
shortness of the campaign 
mode. (JameSpy noted, 
"|The| single-player cam- 
paign is somewhat short." 



"Good Luck Chucl(" does not 
complc|ely disappoint viewers 




Caleb Edgar (right), proud owner of the legendary edition of "Halo 3, " ambushes his adversary 
Ken Bonus (left) in a multiplayer match. (The Clarion Call/Sean Montgomery) 



Sarah 0ent 
Entertainment Editor 

s_sedent@clarion.edu 



^m 




"Good Luck Chuck" 
Lions Gate Films 
Rating: 3/5 



♦ ♦# 



A* 



When I first saw the 
previews for "Good Luck 
Chuck" I thought that it 
looked pretty cute. I mean, 
how can anything that stars 
Dane Cook not look hilari- 
ous? 

After seeing weeks and 
weeks of previews for "Good 



and Spin the Bottle.) 
Charlie refuses to kiss the 
girl, who then proceeds to 
place a hex on him saying 
something to the effect of 
that every woman he dates 
will fall in love and marry 
the next man she meets. 

The movie then goes to 
the present and Charlie is a 
successful dentist. He dis- 
covers at a wedding of one of 
his ex-girlfriends that the 
hex had in fact come true 
about every woman he had 
ever dated. 

Charlie recieves a nick- 
name of "Good Luck Charm" 
and women basically begin 
to throw themselves at him 
for sex so they can meet 
their true love. Charlie has 
quickie after quickie after 
quickie with tons of differ- 
ent women that want to 
meet their true love. 

Also while at the wed- 
ding, Charlie meets Cam 
(Jessica Alba). Cam works 
at a penguin exhibit and 
saying that she is obsessed 
with penguins would be an 




anyone else. However, my 
boyfriend said that he too 
had figured out the storyline 
before the end of the movie. 
I do not think that this 
movie is terrible, however I 
do not think that it is some- 
thing I would waste $8 on if 
you haven't seen it already. 
I am not going to sit 
here and rant and rave 
about it because quite 
frankly. I was a little disap- 
pointed. 

I thought that the pre- 
views were funny and Cook 
is hilarious all the time. 
Therefore, I assumed that 
the movie would be great. 
It's not that it was a bad 
movie, but it certainly was- 



But wait, there is no 
possible way that "Halo 3" 
can live up to the hype that 
has been growing over the 
past few months. Surely 
fans will be disappointed by 
the lack of new features. 
Wrong. 

It is true that initially 
"Halo 3" appears to have the 
same features as the second 
installment, with on-hne 
play, co-op, and campaign 
mode. However, once play- 
ers open the box and pop in 
the disc, they will be pleas- 
antly surprised. 

The game features, 
along with new vehicles, 
there are two main features 
added to the final part. 
There is now a feature that 
allows gamers to record 
moments from their online 
play. They will also be able 



against the Covenant and 
the Flood. At the end of 
"Halo 2" we were left hang- 
ing, as Master Chief trav- 
eled to Earth. Once on 
Earth, Master Chief is 
joined by Marines, which 
now have better driving and 
gunning skills, who attempt 
to stamp out the infidel 
races. 

Due to marketing pur- 
poses Bungie does not give 
away the ending, enticing 
gamers to buy and play the 
game for themselves. 

The day before release 
GameStop reported that 
they sold 4.2 million copies, 
a world volume record. 
Copies of the game sold up 
and beyond $100, which are 
exclusive for the Xbox 360. 

Already many reviews 
are giving "Halo 3" "Game of 



Yet. even with the short 
campaign mode, gamers will 
spend endless hours with 
the online play, which 
makes up for the short story 
mode. 

"Halo 3" is certainly a 
must have for any "Halo" 
fan or Xbox 360 owner, 
without it any collection or 
game system is incomplete. 
Personally I give the game a 
4.5 just because of the short 
story; otherwise it is a per- 
fect 5. 

So go ahead and get 
your own copy and battle to 
the end to find discover the 
final chapter, or spend 
sleepless nights online with 
fiiends and enemies. Either 
way it will be time well 
spent. 



understatement. She is 

Luck Chuck," my boyfriend beautiful, funny and every- n't one of my favorites that I 

and I, accompanied by three thing that Charlie has ever could watch over and over 

wanted in a woman. 

After much talking into. 

Cam finally decides to go 

out with Charlie. Charlie 

begins to fall for her and is 

worried that the curse will 

never be broken and that 

Cam will not love him back. 
I'm pretty sure that 

most of you can figure out 

just from that brief explana- 
tion I just gave you what 

happens next. Therefore, I 

do not feel inclined to tell 

you. 

I believe that 



of our friends, decided on a 
Sunday evening, after the 
Steeler game of course, to 
head over to the movie the- 
atre to check it out. 

I am a huge fan of Cook. 
I can listen to his skits for 
hours upon hours and liter- 
ally ball my eyes out 
because I am laughing so 
hard. Not to mention the 
fact that he is extremely 
good looking. 

The beginning of the 
movie starts out with a 
game of Spin the Bottle. The 

kids playing it would proba- alone is the major downfall 
bly be anywhere between 10 to this movie. It is so pre- 
and 12 years old. Charlie dictible. I could basically tell funny and no one laughed. 



reason 



agam. 

Fans of Cook may be a 
tad bit disappointed with 
his performance. This is 
only for the fact that he 
could've been a lot funnier 
like he has been in the past. 
"Good Luck Chuck" was not 
one of his better perform- 
ances, although it wasn't 
awful. 

I will say that there are 
parts that are extremely 
funny and I cracked up. 
However, the not-so-funny 
parts definitely outweighed 
the funny ones, especially 
those that were meant to be 



on 



(Cook) spins the bottle and what was going to happen at 

lands on a little gothic girl the end of the movie about 

and then has to go into the halfway through. Of course, 

closet. (So this game is basi- I kept my suspiscions to 

cally a mixture between myself, because I didn't 

Seven Minutes in Heaven want to ruin the movie for 



I would recommend this 
movie to people as a renter. 
It's definitely a movie that I 
would rather spend $4.50 on 
instead of $8. 



"CAVEMEN" contin- 
ued from page 6. 

referred to themselves as 
"maggers," had reputations 
for their athletic and sexual 
prowess and were surround- 
ed by white people with bad 
Southern accents who kept 
mistaking the cave-charac- 
ters for the help. 

Creators Josh Gordon 
and Will Speck ("Blades of 
Glory") and Joe Lawson 
attempted at first to defend 
the show as a parody of all 
stereotypes but in the end, 
steps were taken, tweaks 
were made. Tweaks! The 
setting was moved from 
Atlanta to San Diego (well 
known for it's "m agger toler- 
ance") and the word "mag- 
ger" was excised - as were 
all references to any 
assumptions about cave- 
men, the habits of cavemen, 
the history of cavemen or 
pretty much anything inter- 
esting at all. 

Left in a symbolically 
bland apartment were Joel 
(Bill EngHsh). his brother 
Andy (Sam Huntington) and 



their roommate Nick (Nick 
Kroll), three reg'lar guys 
who just happened to be 
rather hirsute and have pro- 
truding foreheads. 

They have moved to San 
Diego so Andy can get over 
his ex-girlfriend, whom he 
stalks via cell phone 
throughout the first episode, 
demanding closure despite 
the fact that she has already 
moved on to another guy 
Nick makes vague refer- 
ences to his dissertation but 
is more interested in con- 
ning Andy into buying a Wii 
game system and, mystify- 
ingly enough, down vests. 

Meanwhile, Joel, who. 
like so many comedic male 
characters these days, 
works in a warehouse-sized 
emporium that requires its 
employees to wear silly 
shirts, has a Big Secret ■- 
he's dating a Homo sapiens. 
And when the boys find out. 
they do not approve. "Keep 
the penis in the genus," is. 1 
believe. Nick's exact 
response, which is as close 
as the show gets to anything 
resembling parody, social 



commentary oi' humor, 
albeit of a stultifying .sopho- 
moric variety 

None of which should be 
taken as a request that 
"Cavemen" return to its 
unsettling origins, with the 
mint juleps and the lynch 
mob references. But if you're 
going to force us to look at 
guys made up to look like 
cavemen, then let them be 
cavemen, for goodness' sake. 
The idea of using cave- 
men to parody all the ridicu- 
lous prejudices that dog vir- 
tually every "group" in 
America is not a bad one. 
But such a show requires 
both delicacy and a fearless 
backswing -- why shouldn't 
the cavemen be considered 
cheap or humorless or great 
decorators or social-climb- 
ing or terrorists or pushy 
while waiting in line at 
Starbucks? But if they are, 
as the show's intro says, 
"just like us." then what's 
the point? Don't bother me 
with cavemen: they're just 
big. hairy and boring. I'd 
rather see a show about 
insurance salesmen. 



^iiwIWPW 



Pages 



Tlffi CLAMON CALL 



October 4. 2007 



a 



ClissilMs 



lireek \k Travel, Emplof ment, For Rent, fmmk and General tds 



FO R ROT 

LAKKN APARTMENTS- 
fully fiirnishod. UtUitiea 
IncllidfijL Availubh' Fall 
2008/Spring 2009 for 1-3 
people. Houses available for 
2-8 people. Exceptionally 
nice and CLEAN. Call Patty 
at (814) 745-3121 or 229- 
1683. www.Iakenapart- 
ments.net 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CI^SS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562-1020 



Next to campus, various 
houses and apartments. 
Accommodating! -4 students 
or groups of 3-4. Some 
include utilities. Rent starts 
at $1200 per semester. Visit 
us online at 

www.aceyrental.com or call 
Brian at 814-227-1238 



800-648-4849 
www.st8travel.com 



or 





MlM 



Spring Break 2008 . Sell 
Trips. Earn Cash and Go 
Free. Call for group dis- 
counts. Best Prices 
Guaranteed! Jamaica, 
Cancun, Acapulco, 

Bahamas, S. Padre, Florida. 



ON mESVAY.NoVEmm erUyVOTF. 



MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

acemontana(g)ccybernet.com 

-{814)226-7316 

PAID Wn BV THl CANVIVATE 



Congratulations to the 
Delta Zeta sister of the 
week, Shannon Salak! 

Good job to the Delta Zeta 
chair of the week, Terria 
Dotson! 

Come meet Alpha Phi 
Omega! The co-ed communi- 
ty service fraternity is hold- 
ing Rush Week Oct. 8-11, 
from 6-7 p.m. in 203 Davis. 



PERSONALS 

■MMiMiiiaMMMiirirtiM^ 
Special Shout out to God for 
blessing LEV with outstand- 
ing leaders, musicians and 
members on their spiritual 
journey. 
-Elijah Evrett 

HAPPY ALF!! Be safe and 
make good choices! 

Kim & Fontaine, 

I'm way excited for EL 

PATIO Round 2, Clarion 

style!! 

-Linds 



Penguins Trivia 

How much do you know? 



Take the Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay Grystar 

In what year did the Penguins start playing in the NHL? 
A. 1960 B. 1967 

C. 1968 D. 1972 

What were the Penguins first team colors? 

A. Black and Gold B. Blue and Red 

C. Blue and White D. Black and White 

In what year did the Penguins draft Mario Lemieux? 
A. 1984 B. 1982 

C. 1985 D. 1986 

How many Stanley Cup Championships have the Penguins won? 
A. B. 1 

C. 2 D. 3 

Sidney Crosby was the youngest person in NHL history to: 
A. Score 100 points in a season B. Be named team captain 
C. Lead the NHL in scoring D. All of the above 



'pg '3-^7 'B-g '0 z qiiSjaMsuy 




Jenna Grafton 

Junior, mass media arts 
& journalism 
"Free Bird" by Lynard Skynard 




By 

Stefanie Jula 

'What song should 

everyone have on 

their iTUNES 

playUstr 




I _i 



Billy Martin 

Freshman, |vtAfli;c:ETiiNG 

"Living pp sa Prayer" by Bon Jovi 



Leah Farrell 

Sophomore, history & Politicai 

Science 
"Flannigans Ball" by Dropkick Murphys 






Todd Russell 

Freshmen, Undecided 

"Hakuna Matata" from Disney's 

The Lion King 



Samantha Stanton 

Sophomore, Elementary 

Special Education 

"Separate Ways" by Journey 



Kassandra Fink 

Freshmen, Elementary Education 
"Sweet Child 0' Mine" by Guns N' Roses 




I 



October 4. 2007 



TIffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Young middle hitters provide key contributions for Golden Eagle Volleyball 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s..kgschroyer®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 4 - To play 
volleyball, it is preferable 
that one is tall. While some- 
one like Vicky Gentile, who 
stands all of 5'4, defies this 
trait, it is still a preferred 
quality in a volleyball play- 
er. One position this espe- 
cially holds true for is that 
of the middle hitter. Last 
season, Golden Eagle mid- 
dle hitters Lindsay Banner 
and Lauren Carter, stood at 
six feet or taller. 

With Banner graduat- 
ing and Carter transferring, 
new head coach Jennifer 
Harrison had a daunting 
task in front of her. After all 
it's not easy to replace mid- 
dle hitters. However with 
6'2 Nicole Andrusz and 5'10 
Sarah Sheffield, Harrison 
seems to have completed 
that task nicely. 

Both hailing from New 
York, Andrusz and Sheffield 
came in and won the start- 
ing middle hitter positions 
for this season. After their 
weekend series in 
Shippensburg, both players 
can be found among the top 
of the statistical leader 
boards for Clarion. 

Despite some rookie 
mistakes, coach Jennifer 
Harrison has said that she 
is "Definitely pleased," with 
her two young players. "I 
think their development has 



been good, and as we contin- 
ue through the season, it 
will get better," she said. 

Even though the pair 
has already made a big 
impact, Harrison thinks 
there will be even more 
opportunities for the two of 
them. "They (Andrusz and 
Sheffield) have been limited 
a little early on, and other 
teams are starting to notice 
it and key in on our other 
hitters. However, we're try- 
ing to get our middles more 
involved and used to the col- 
lege level," said Harrison. 

Despite their early suc- 
cesses, both Andrusz and 
Sheffield have acknowl- 
edged some challenges in 
difficulties in adjusting to 
the college game. 

"It's been hard," said 
Andrusz. "One of the main 
things has been adjusting to 
all the different styles 
between my club teams and 
playing here," she also 
added. 

"For me, it's a little dif- 
ferent," said Sheffield. "I'm 
playing with a similar style 
here (at Clarion) that I 
played with before, but I've 
had to work on my tech- 
nique a lot more." 

Difficulties aside, both 
players have become inte- 
gral parts of the Golden 
Eagle lineup. As of October 
2nd, both players were cur- 
rently sharing the team lead 
in blocks with 51 a piece. 
Andrusz and Sheffield also 
rank fourth and fifth in kills 



for Clarion with 119 and 75 
respectively. 

With half of their season 
remaining, both players are 
looking to keep on contribut- 
ing to their team's early suc- 
cess. Also, as both are only 
freshmen, the Golden 
Eagles may possibly be 
established at the middle 
hitter position for the next 
three seasons. With 

Andrusz and Sheffield lock- 
ing down the middle hitter 
spots, that most certainly is 
not a bad thing. 

Last weekend, the 
Golden Eagle volleyball 
team traveled east to play at 
West Chester. Competing in 
their PSAC-East cross-over 
matches, the Golden Eagles 
played Shippensburg, West 
Chester, and East 
Stroudsburg. 

Despite an opening 3-2 
loss to Shippensburg. the 
Golden Eagles rebounded to 
defeat both West Chester 
and East Stroudsburg to fin- 
ish the weekend at two and 
one. 

After a 3-1 loss to 
Edinboro on l\iesday night, 
the Golden Eagles were 17-3 
with a 3-2 record in the 
PSAC-West. The loss will 
most likely drop Clarion to 
third in the PSAC-West 
behind California and 
Edinboro. They will be in 
action again next Tuesday 
at home against Slippery 
Rock. Game time is at 7 
p.m. 




The Golden Eagles volleyball team Is 17-3 this season after their loss to Edinboro on Tuesday Oct. 
3. Their next game will be on Tuesday Oct. 10 when they host Slippery Rock University. (The 
Clarion Call/ Mam Huff) 



Pirates finish 68-94, fail to reacli playoffs for 15th consecutive season 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.edu 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Ca// Sports Editor 

iekb|)wser@clariori;eyu' 



It's October and the 
2007 season for the 
Pittsburgh Pirates is over. 
Failing to reach .500 and 
make the playoffs for the fif- 
teenth season in a row. One 
season short of setting the 
all-time mark for consecu- 
tive losing season's in any 
major pro sports league. The 
1933-48 Philadelphia 

Phillies held the record 
alone before the Pirates tied 
them this season. 

This year's rendition of 
the Pirates finished at 68- 
94. Once again, the Buccos 



Pirates Statistical Leaders 



Avg: Freddy Sanchez, .304 
Homeruns: Adam La Roc he and 
Jason Bay,tled with21 
RBI: Adann LaRoche, 88 
Wins: Tom Gorzelanny, 14 



Saves: MattCapps, 18 




found themselves in the cel- 
lar of the National League 
Central, 17 games behind 
the division winning 
Chicago Cubs, after losing 



13 of their last 15 games. 

The Pirates winning 
percentage of .428 placed 
them last in the N.L., and 
second to last in all of the 



major leagues. Only Tampa 
Bay finished worse with a 
.420 winning percentage. 

Though it is unlikely 
that any of the Pirates will 
win any awards from the 
Major LeagvteSrtWe here at 
the Clarion Call decided to 
distribute our own end of- 
season honors. So read 
away and enjoy the first 
ever Buccy Awards: 

Biggest Surprise and the 
Buccy goes to.... 
KS: Paul Maholm 
Many fans were screaming 
for Maholm to be taken out 
of the starting rotation after 
his dreadful start. To Jim 
Tracy's credit, he decided to 
keep Maholm in the rota- 
tion. Tracy's faith was 
rewarded as Maholm 
rebounded nicely lowering 



his ERA by over a run from 
his first half 4.76 to his sec- 
ond half 3.47. 

Overall, he finished at 
10-15 with a 5.02 ERA. If 
Maholm continues to build 
on his strong second half, he 
could become a solid #3 
starter that will pay divi- 
dends for the team. 
EB: Tom Gorzelanny 
Gorzelanny was never tout- 
ed as a top-notch pitcher. In 
brief stints with the Bucs in 
2005 and 2006 he only man- 
aged a 2-6 record with an 
ERA of 4.55 in 67.2 innings. 
This season Gorzo emerged 
as top of the rotation big lea- 
guer in his first full season. 
He finished with a 14-10 
record and an ERA of 3.88 in 
201.2 innings. 

Gorzo should be a main- 
stay at the top of the rota- 



tion for years to come and as 
long as Ian Snell and Paul 
Maholm continue to 
improve along with a revival 
of Zach Duke the Pirates 
rotation could carry them to 
the playoffs. 

Biggest Disappointment 
and the Buccy goes to.... 
KS: Zach Duke 

Steve Blass may be getting 
some company soon. 
Nobody from Joe Schmo to 
Jim Colborn seems to be 
able to understand what has 
happened with this former 
future ace for the Buccos. 
One of the biggest reported 
assets for Duke was his abil- 
ity to adjust his pitching 
style to hitters. 

See "PIRATES" on 
page 10. 





Flag Football Results 

mm 



C Invasion 
Your Mom 
Lock Down 
That Team 
KSAC 

Little Giants 
Mac Attack 
Crim Criminals 
Garden Gnome 
Busch 
9/27/07 
If this was Halo 
X Factor 
That Team 
98 Degrees 
Click Clack 
That Team 
Goonies 
BN Kennelz 



Lights Out 
Purple C K 
Franchise 
D-9 Destoy 
Mean Machine 
Tacklin Hoes 
98 Degrees 
Goonies 
FNR 
Team Banks 

That Team 
Messin w/ Sas 
X-Factor 
McLovin 
Mac Attack 
Wean'tBT 
Busch 
Pen Pushers 



6M5 
87-20 
57-14 
23-14 
36-30 
F 

38-28 
46-25 
55-46 
18-17 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Tennis Results 

t 0/? / 7 

Megan Parsons Kara Blazonczyk 6-0 
NickCaggiano Gabriel Proietti 6-0 

Dodgeball Results 

1 0/1/0 7 

Hapa Hadles The Pandas 2-0 

Ranch 44 Pandas 2-0 

We Want Sheetz Team Steak F 



Beach Volleyball Champs 



Flag Football Undefeated Teams 



3. Click Clack 4-0 

6. Your Mom 5-0 

9. Garden Gnomes 4-0 

22. KSAC 4-0- 

24. Untouchables 3-0 

28. Lockdown 4-0 

32. If this was Halo... 5-0 

35. Caucasian Invasion 1-0 

W2. Little Giants 2-0 




10/4/07 




Volleyball Results 

IO/? /07 

AthChalllll Yes or No 21-14,21-14 
In Your face 21-15,21-15 
CU Staff F 
Tteeaam2 21-6,19-21,15-8 
Bailers 21-14,21-17 

CU Girls 22-24.23-21.15-13 



W L Banner 
No Names 
CU's Finest 
ZTA 

Delta Zeta 
I0/I/Q7 
CU Staff 
Wolverines 
9/26/07 
ZTA 

CU's Finest 
CU Girls 



AthChalllll 22-20,21-14 
UgStick 15.21.21-14, rS-IO 



Delta Zeta 21-11,26-24 
Bailers 21-10.21-13 

WWforSets2l-ll, 21-11 

Outdoor Soccer Results 

10/1/07 



Volleybail Undefeated Teams 

WI.ZTA 3-0 

W2. CU's Finest 4-0 

C2.We Love Banner 5-0 

Dogeball Undefeated Teams 

I. Cincinnati Bonties 5-0 

5. Grity Nasty 4-0 

9. We Want Sheetz 6-0 

CLUB SPORT CORNER 



Women's - "Off in the Shower" 

Leslie Sunder, Ellen Burt, Steph 
Estok, Lauryn Suvoyi, Sarah Kierek, 
and Nicole Lamer. 

10 / 1/07 Chimp ip n i hi p 

Off in the Shower Delta Zeta 

24.22,21-13,15-11 
Men's Championship is Wed 10/3 



St Elmo's Fire 

Dunlap 

Porck Chop's II 

9/26/07 

KY Fried Boneheads 

Barbous 



Barbous 4-2 
Team Crash 5-0 
Refner's Mom 5-2 

Refiner's Mom F 
Porkchopll 2-1 





In-Line Hockey Club opened their season 
last week at Robert Morris University widi a 
2-1 Overtime victory against Grove City! 
Next game is 10/4 vs. Slippery Rock. 
Ultimate Frisbee Club tnveled to 
Gettysburg last week-end for their first 
tournament appearance of the semester. 
Women's Rugby Club lost to lUP last 
Sunday 31-22 and hosts Oberlin Saturday. 
Men's Rugby Club lost to Franciscan last 
Saturday and hosts lUP this Saturday. 



ie8 



THE CLARION CALL 



flissiM 



October 4. 2007 



(imk Ids, Travel, liinpliijiiifiil, For Keiil. ktmk mi licncml Ids 



OR REiNT 




or 



I.AKKN APAKTMKNTS- 
fully furnished. Utilitieg 
IncludeA Available Fall 
2()()iS/S|)rinu 2009 for l-.'i 
people. Houses available for 
2-S people. Kxceptionallv 
nice and CLKAN. Call Patty 
at (HI 4) 7l.r;!121 or 229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
ments.net 



Next to campus, various 8()0-(vlS- 18 U) 

houses and apartments. www,ststravel.c(tm 

Accommodating! -4 student > -i«»»«««i«i«iiiiB««,« 
or groups of :\-\. Some fiftP^K^ 

include utilities. Rent starts ^n^JkFk^ 

at ,$1200 i)er semester. V^isit 

us online at Congratulations to the 

www.aceyrental.com or call Delta Zeta sister of the 



Brian at 81 4-227- 1238 

""^iiPffiiniiiHiiiiiiispii 



week, Shannon Salak! 

Good job to the Delta Zeta 
chair of the week, Terria 
Dot son! 



Penguins Trivia 

How much do you know? 



KOLi. OUTOF BED AND '"^pnng Break 2008 . Sell Come meet Alpha Phi 
(10 TO CLASS! Houses and '''"'P-^- •*-"'" ^^'^^^^ an^^ ('" Omega! The co-ed communi- 
apartments next to campus. *'''•'''■ ^''^'1 f^"' K'l'oup dis- ty service fraternity is hold- 
See them at www.grayand- f'"i"if^' Best Prices ing Rush Week ()ct. 8-11, 
companynet or call FHKK ^'" iiii»'<>iiteed! Jamaica, from 6-7 p.m. in 203 Davis. 

C.ravaiul Co. 877-.')62-H)20 <-"i»"t^'U»- Acapulco. 

Bahamas, S. Padre, Florida "'— "■»— i^^— 



ON TuisvAY, NovEMmn em^VOTE. 



MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

acemontana@ccybernet.com 

(814)226-7316 

PAW fOn 3Y THE CAmiVATE 



PERSONALS 

Special Shout out to God for 
blessing LEV with outstand- 
ing leaders, musicians and 
members on their spiritual 
journey. 
-Elijah Evrett 

HAPPY ALF!! Be safe and 
make good choices! 

Kim & Fontaine, 

Fm way excited for EL 

PATIO Round 2, Clarion 

style!! 
Linds 



Take the Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay Grystar 

in what year did the Penguins start plaving in the NHL'' 
A. 19(i0 B. 1967 

C. 1968 D. 1972 

What were the Penguins first team colors? 

A. Black and Gold B. Blue and Red 

C. Blue and White D. Black and White 

In what year did the Penguins draft Mario Lemieu.x? 
A. 1984 B. 1982 

r. 1985 D. 1986 

How many Stanley Cup Championships have the Penguins won'' 
A. B. 1 

C. 2 D. 3 

Sidney Crosby was the youngest person in NHL history to: 
A. Score 100 points in a season B. Be named team captain 
C. Lead the NHL in scoring D. All of the above 



'p g ',Tf 'Bj; •,! Y, qiiS.iAwsuy 




Jenna Grafton 

.lU.X'lOK. .M.X.S.S Mi:i)IA AKTS 
& .lOlJKN.Al.lSM 

'Free Bird" by Lynard Skynard 




By 

Stefanie Jula 

'What song should 

everyone have on 

their iTUNES 

playlistr 




Billy Martin 

Frf:SHMAN, MARKKTlNfi 
'Living on ^a Prayer" bv Bon Jovi 



Leah Farrell 

Sol'HO.VlOKK, Ml.srORY & P( )|.l'ri< Al. 
St'lKNCK 

"Flannigans Ball" by Dropkick Murphys 






Todd Russell 

FR F-:s H M KN . U .\' 11 1: ( ' II ) K u 

"Hakuna Matata" from. Disney's 
The Lion King 



Samantha Stajstton 

Sophomore, Elemeniary 

Si'KciAi, Education 

"Separate Ways" by Journey 



Kassandra Fink 

F^RE.sHMEN, Elementary Education 

"Sweet Child 0' Mine" by Guns N' Roses 





erage of Autumn Leaf 
^#$^vent of the year! 

ational City Bank Tour- 

aTaie starts at 1 1 a.m.on 

S^ iff day. 

^hlr addition to its ever- 
Sm P.S.A.C Football! 

I of t^e Week features two 
^ *^ Rivals, as California and 
na set^Aj^gs off at 2 p.m. Clarion vs. 
Shippensburg Will follow at 6 p.m. 



October 4. 2007 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Young midd le hitters provide l<ey contributions for Golden Eagle Volleyball 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s kgschfoyer@clarion,ecJu 

C1.ARI()N. Oct. 4 - To play 
v()lleyl)all, it is preferable 
that one is tall. While some- 
one like Vicky (lentile, who 
stands all of 5'4. defies this 
trait, it is still a preferred 
quality in a volleyball play- 
er One position this espe- 
cially holds true for is that 
of the middle hitter. Last 
season, (lolden p]agle mid- 
dle hitters Lindsay Banner 
and Lauren Carter, stood at 
six feet or taller. 

With Banner graduat- 
ing and Carter transferring, 
new head coach Jennifer 
Harrison had a daunting 
task in front of her. After all 
it's not easy to replace mid- 
dle hitters. However with 
6'2 Nicole Andrusz and 5' 10 
Sarah Sheffield, Harrison 
seems to have completed 
that task nicely. 

Both hailing from New 
York, Andrusz and Sheffield 
came in and won the start- 
ing middle hitter positions 
for this season. After their 
weekend series in 

Shippensburg, both players 
can be found among the top 
of the statistical leader 
boards for Clarion, 

Despite some rookie 
mistakes, coach Jennifer 
Harrison has said that she 
is "Definitely pleased," with 
her two young players. "I 
think their development has 



been good, and as we contin- 
ue through the sea.sun. it 
will get better," she said, 

Kven though the pair 
has already made a big 
impact, Harri,son thinks 
there will be even more 
opportunities for the two of 
them. "They (Andrusz and 
Sheffield) have been limited 
a little early on, and other 
teams are starting to notice 
it and key in on our other 
hitters. However, we're try- 
ing to get our middles more 
involved and used to the col- 
lege level," said Harrison. 

Despite their early suc- 
cesses, both Andrusz and 
Sheffield have acknowl- 
edged some challenges in 
difficulties in adjusting to 
the college game. 

"It's been hard," said 
Andrusz. "One of the main 
things has been adjusting to 
all the different styles 
between my club teams and 
playing here," she also 
added. 

"For me, it's a little dif- 
ferent," said Sheffield. "I'm 
playing with a similar style 
here (at Clarion) that I 
played with before, but I've 
had to work on my tech- 
nique a lot more." 

Difficulties aside, both 
players have become inte- 
gral parts of the Golden 
Eagle lineup. As of October 
2nd, both players were cur- 
rently sharing the team lead 
in blocks with 51 a piece. 
Andrusz and Sheffield also 
rank fourth and fifth in kills 



for Clarion with 119 and 7.) 
respectively. 

With half of their season 
remaining, both players are 
looking to keep on contribut- 
ing to their team's early suc- 
cess. Also, as both are only 
freshmen. the Golden 
Eagles may possibly be 
established at the middle 
hitter position for the next 
three seasons. With 

Andrusz and Sheffield lock- 
ing down the middle hitter 
spots, that most certainly is 
not a bad thing. 

Last weekend, the 
Golden Eagle volleyball 
team traveled east to play at 
West Chester Competing in 
their PSAC-East cross-over 
matches, the Golden Eagles 
played Shippensburg, West 
Chester, and East 

Stroudsburg. 

Despite an opening 3-2 
loss to Shippensburg, the 
Golden Eagles rebounded to 
defeat both West Chester 
and East Stroudsburg to fin- 
ish the weekend at two and 
one. 

After a 3-1 loss to 
Edinboro on Tuesday night, 
the Golden Eagles were 17-3 
with a 3-2 record in the 
PSAC-West. The loss will 
most likely drop Clarion to 
third in the PSAC-West 
behind California and 
Edinboro. They will be in 
action again next Tuesday 
at home against Slippery 
Rock. Game time is at 7 
p.m. 





The Golden Eagles volleyball team is 17-3 this season after their loss to Edinboro on Tuesday Oct. 
3. Their next game will be on Tuesday Oct. 10 when they host Slippery Rock University f T^e 
Clarion Call/Mam Huff) 



Pirates finish 68-94, fail to reach playoffs for 15th consecutive season 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.edu 




Eric Bowser 

Clarion Ca// Sports Editor 

S_ekb6wser@clarlon.eclu" ' 



It's October and the 
2007 season for the 
Pittsburgh Pirates is over. 
Failing to reach .500 and 
make the playoffs for the fif- 
teenth season in a row. One 
season short of setting the 
all-time mark for consecu- 
tive losing season's in any 
major pro sports league. The 
1933-48 Philadelphia 

Phillies held the record 
alone before the Pirates tied 
them this season. 

This year's rendition of 
the Pirates finished at 68- 
94. Once again, the Buccos 



Avg: Freddy Sanchez, 304 
Homeruns: Adam LaRoche and 
JasbnBay,tifedwith21 
RBI: Adam LaRoche, 88 
Wins: Tom Gorzelanny; 14 
Saves: MattCappsJS 
Stni<e4t|: ilan^nell!77 - 




found themselves in the eel- 1 3 of their last 15 games. 
lar of the National League The Pirates winning 

Central, 17 games behind percentage of .428 placed 

the division winning them last in the N.L., and 

Chicago Cubs, after losing second to last in all of the 



major leagues. Only Tampa 
Bay finished worse with a 
.420 winning percentage. 

Though it is unlikely 
that any of the Pirates will 
win any awards from the 
Major Leagues,, we here at 
the Clarion Call decided to 
distribute our own end of- 
season honors. So read 
away and enjoy the first 
ever Buccy Awards-' 

Biggest Surprise and the 
Buccy goes to.... 
KS: Paul Maholm 
Many fans were screaming 
for Maholm to be taken out 
of the starting rotation after 
his dreadful start. To Jim 
Tracy's credit, he decided to 
keep Maholm in the rota- 
tion. Tracy's faith was 
rewarded as Maholm 
rebounded nicely lowering 



his ERA by over a run from 
his first half 4.76 to his sec- 
ond half 3.47. 

Overall, he finished at 
10-15 with a 5.02 ERA. If 
Maholm continues to build 
on his strong second half, he 
could become a solid #3 
starter that will pay divi- 
dends for the team. 
EB" Tom Gorzelanny 
Gorzelanny was never tout- 
ed as a top-notch pitcher In 
brief stints with the Bucs in 
2005 and 2006 he only man- 
aged a 2-6 record with an 
ERA of 4.55 in 67.2 innings. 
This season Gorzo emerged 
as top of the rotation big lea- 
guer in his first full season. 
He finished with a 14-10 
record and an ERA of 3.88 in 
201.2 innings. 

Gorzo should be a main- 
stay at the top of the rota- 



tion for years to come and as 
long as Ian Snell and Paul 
Maholm continue to 
improve along with a revival 
of Zach Duke the Pirates 
rotation could carry them to 
the playoffs. 

Biggest Disappointment 
and the Buccy goes to.... 
KS: Zach Duke 

Steve Blass may be getting 
some company soon. 
Nobody from Joe Schmo to 
Jim Colborn seems to be 
able to understand what has 
happened with this former 
future ace for the Buccos. 
One of the biggest reported 
assets for Duke was his abil- 
ity to adjust his pitching 
style to hitters. 

See "PIRATES" on 
page 10. 




Flag Football Results 

10/1/07 



C Invasion 
Your Mom 
Lock Down 
That Team 
KSAC 

Little Giants 
Mac Attack 
Crim Criminals 
Garden Gnome 
Busch 
9/27/07 
If this was Halo 
X Factor 
That Team 
98 Degrees 
Click Clack 
That Team 
Goonies 
BN Kennelz 



Lights Out 61-45 

Purple C K 87-20 

Franchise 57-14 

D-9Destoy 23-14 

Mean Machine 36-30 

Tacklin Hoes F 

98 Degrees 38-28 

Goonies 46-25 

FNR 55-46 

Team Banks 18-17 



That Team 
Messin w/ Sas 
X-Factor 
McLovin 
Mac Attack 
We Can't BT 
Busch 
Pen Pushers 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Tennis Results 

10/2/07 

Megan Parsons Kara Blazonczyk 6-0 
NickCaggiano Gabriel Proiettl 6-0 

Dodgeball Results 

tO/l/07 

Napa Hadles The Pandas 2-0 

9/26/07 

Ranch 44 Pandas 2-0 

We Want Sheetz Team Steak F 



Beach Volleyball Champs 



10/4/07 




Flag Football Undefeated Teams 



3. Click Clack 4-0 

6. Your Mom 5-0 

9. Garden Gnomes 4-0 

22. KSAC 4-0-1 

24. Untouchables 3-0 

28. Lockdown 4-0 

32. If this was Halo... 5-0 

35. Caucasian Invasion 1-0 

W2. Little Giants 2-0 




Volleyball Results 

10/2/07 

AthChailll! Yes or No 21-14,21-14 
WL Banner In Your face 21-15,21-15 
CU Staff F 
Tteeaam2 21-6,19-21,15-8 
Bailers 21-14,21-17 

CU Girls 22-24,23-21,15-13 



No Names 
CU's Finest 
ZTA 

Delta Zeta 
10/1/07 
CU Staff 
Wolverines 
9/26/07 
ZTA 

CU's Finest 
CU Girls 



Ath Chall 
Ug Stick 



III 22-20,21-14 
5-21.21-14,15-10 



Volleyball Undefeated Teams 

WI.ZTA 3-0 

W2. CU's Finest 4-0 

C2.We Love Banner 5-0 

Dogeball Undefeated Teams 

I . Cincinnati Bonties 5-0 

5. Grity Nasty 4-0 

9. We Want Sheetz 6-0 



CLUB SPORT CORNER 



Delta Zeta 21-11,26-24 
Bailers 21-10.21-13 

WW for Sets 21-11,21-1 1 

Outdoor Soccer Results 

10/1/07 



Women's - "Off in the^hower'' 
Leslie Sunder, Ellen Burt, Steph 
Estok, Lauryn Suvoyi, Sarah Kierek, 
and Nicole Lamer. 

10/1/07 Cham pionship 
Off in the Shower Delta Zeta 

24-22.21-13,15.11 
Men's Championship is Wed 10/3 



St. Elmo's Fire 

Dunlap 

Porck Chop's II 

9/26/07 

KY Fried Boneheads 

Barbous 



Barbous 4-2 
Team Crash 5-0 
Refner's Mom 5-2 

Refner's Mom F 
Porkchopll 2-1 





In-Llne Hockey Club opened their season 
last week at Robert Morris University with a 
2-1 Overtime victory against Grove City! 
Next game is 10/4 vs. Slippery Rock. 
Ultimate Frisbee Club traveled to 
Gettysburg last week-end for their first 
tournament appearance of the semester. 
Women's Rugby Club lost to lUP last 
Sunday 3 1-22 and hosts Oberlin Saturday. 
Men's Rugby Club lost to Franciscan last 
Saturday and hosts lUP this Saturday. 



•^mmmmm^^ 



PagelO 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 4. 2007 



Sfirts 



Mf : Golf wJDS n«stiniD$l«r Intite Fmhinaii big io «« ol y le}y I \m 



Soccer defeats Gannon 1-0, remains in tiiird piece in PSAC-West 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_tckovalovs®clarlon,eclu 

CLARION, Oct 2 - The 
Golden Eagles shut out 
their non-conference oppo- 
nent, the Gannon Knights 
(7-3-1), 1-0 at home on 
Sunday vSept. 30. 

Despite being outshot 
20-6 and having only one 
corner kick to Gannon's 
seven, Clarion was able to 
win it on an unassisted 
cross shot goal from fresh- 
man Jill Miller in the 49th 
minute. 

It was Miller's third goal 
of the season, giving her a 
total of six points, both team 
highs. Miller and teammate 
Chelsea Wolff both had two 
shots on goal. Four other 
Golden Eagles each had one 
shot. 

Senior goalkeeper Jess 
Reed continued her strong 
play, posting her fourth 
shutout of the season, tying 




Sophomore Caitlin Borden Is pictured above handling the ball in one of the Golden Eagles recent games. Clarion won Sunday Sept. 
30 1-0 against Gannon University. Clarion's next home match will be Thursday Oct. 4. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 



a career high that she set 
last year. She made a total 
of 6 saves in the game, 
increasing her season total 
to 52. If she continues at 
her current pace, she will 
set career highs in save per- 
centage (.800) and goals 
against average (2.02) this 
season. 



Clarion had a game the 
next day against a 
PSAC-West conference 
opponent, the Lock Haven 
Eagles. Lock Haven 

avenged a loss to Clarion 
earlier in the season by 
shutting out the Golden 
Eagles 1-0. 

The loss dropped Clar- 



ion's record to 2-3-1 in 
PSAC-West play and 4-5-2 
overall. 

Arielle Gordon headed 
in the only goal of the game 
in the 70th minute off of a 
pass from Katie Decker. 

Clarion gave up a total 
of twenty four shots, the sec- 
ond most all season. Nine of 



Lock Haven's 14 players had 
shots on goal. Katie Decker, 
Lindsay Blessing, and 
Rebekah Stonecypher each 
had four shots, while 
Clarion only posted eight 
shots. Rebecca Downs led 
the way with three, followed 
by Chelsea Wolff who added 
two of her own. 



In the nin for Lock 
Haven, senior goalkeeper 
Emily Wagner became Lock 
Haven's all-time leading 
career saves leader. She 
ended the day with eight 
saves, improving her total to 
300 in her career. ' 

Clarion is now tied for 
third place in the 
PSAC-West with Lock 
Haven. Both have seven 
points off of two wins and 
one tie. Slippery Rock 
maintains a strong lead 
with 19 points, followed by 
Edinboro at 11. 

The Golden Eagles stay 
home to face PSAC-West 
conference opponent 

California (2-10-1, 0-5- 1) on 
Thursday and nonconfer- 
ence opponent West Virginia 
Wesleyan (9-3-1) Sunday. 

They will then travel to 
Edinboro (6-2-3, 3-1-2) on 
Wednesday. Clarion has 
already beaten California 
and tied Edinboro earlier in 
the season. 



Golden Eagles football falls to 12th ranked California 56-0 



Jordan Scrltchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sJsscritchf@clarion.edu 

CALIFORNIA Sept. 29- 
Last Saturday night, the 
inexperience showed for the 
Golden Eagles as they lost 
56-0 to California at 
Adamson Stadium. The 
game marked the 
PSAC-West opener for both 
teams. 

The big news for 
Clarion, was not good news. 
Quarterback Tyler Huether 
injured his hand in the first 
half, and was replaced by 
backup Gino Rometo. This 
game was extremely one- 
sided, and was dominated 
from start to finish by the 
Vulcans. 

California had 519 




The Golden Eagles football team cirop(»cl tteir record to 0-5 
with their 56-0 loss at 12th ranked California. Clarion returns 
home this week to host Shippensburg (0-5) on October 6. (The 
Clarion Ca///Archive Photo) 



393 yards on the ground and 
126 through the air. 
Quarterback Joe Ruggiero 
went 10-15 for 104 yards 
and a touchdown, and run- 
ning back Brandon 



for 177 yards and three 
touchdowns. 

Both Ruggiero and 
Lombardy, along with the 
rest of the Vulcan starters, 
sat out the entire second 



Clarion, on the other 
hand, had strikingly differ- 
ent statistics. They had 84 
total yards, including 22 
rushing yards and 62 pass- 
ing yards. Quarterback 
Tyler Huether, before he 
was injured, went 3-9 for 24 
yards, and backup Gino 
Rometo completed five of 14 
passes for 34 yards. 
Running back Eddie 
Emmanuel also rushed 17 
times for 36 yards. 

In the first quarter, 
after a Clarion punt, 
California drove 80 yards in 
six plays and went ahead 7- 
on a 40-yard touchdown 
run by Lombardy. 

Later in the first, 
Clarion had the ball again 
and got two first downs, but 
were tripped up by a holding 
penalty and were eventually 



first quarter, the game was 
still close, California only 
led the Golden Eagles 7-0. 

The second quarter, 
however, was an entirely 
different ballgame. 

Jermaine Moye returned a 
punt for 51 yards to the 
Clarion 22 yard line. Four 
plays later, Lombardy car- 
ried to the goal line and 
fumbled, but teammate 
Nate Forse recovered in the 
end zone with 11:56 remain- 
ing to put the Vulcans ahead 
14-0. 

Lombardy then scored 
on touchdown runs of 1 and 
36 yards to put California 
ahead 28-0 with 3:59 left in 
the second. Later in the sec- 
ond, Nate Forse caught an 
18-yard touchdown pass 
from Ruggiero for a 35-0 
lead. 



blocked a Clarion punt and 
Patrick Swearinger recov- 
ered the ball in the end zone 
for a 42-0 lead at halftime. 

California added on 
another two scores in the 
second half to complete a 56- 
win. 

California dominated 
Clarion in just about every 
statistical category. 

The Vulcans compiled 
26 first downs to Clarion's 
seven, and California con- 
trolled the ball for 3&-3S 
compared to 22:14 for 
Clarion. 

The Golden Eagles 
return home to face the 
Shippensburg Raiders, who 
are also 0-5, in hopes of 
righting their ship on 
Homecoming Day at A.L.F. 
at 2 p.m. this coming 
Saturday. 



yards of offense, including Lombardy rushed 16 times half. 



forced to punt. After the The Vulcans then 



Golf team finishes in top two in each of last two tournaments 



Denise SImens 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_dnsimens@clanon.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 3 - On 
September 24-25, the golf 



team headed to 

Moundsville, WV, to com- 
pete in the Wheeling Jesuit 
Tournament. 

The Golden Eagles fin- 
ished tied for second with 
Concord with a score of 595. 



Millersville shot a 593 and 
won the event. 

On the first day of com- 
petition. Clarion finished 
with a score of 308 and 
wrapped up the next day 
with a tournament low of 



287. Sophomore Nick 
Sanner led the way with 78, 
70 - 148, and senior Preston 
Mullens followed closely 
with a 79, 70 - 149. 

Other Clarion scores 
were junior Justin Cameron 



continued from 
"PIRATES" on page 9. 

That certainly was not 
the case this season as he 
went 3-8 with a 5.53 ERA. 
To add further insult, Duke 
missed parts of the season 
due to injury. Seemingly a 
shell of his 8-2 rookie self, 
Duke seems destined to join 
the likes of Francisco 
Cordova and Kris Benson in 
Pirates lore. 
EB: Jason Bay 
Since his rookie of the year 
performance in 2004, Bay 
seemed to be the one player 
the Pirates could always 
count on. With probably his 
best support surrounding 
him in the lineup this sea- 
son Bay put up career lows 
in home runs, total bases, on 
base percentage, slugging 
percentage and batting 
average. 

The woe's weren't just at 
the dish for Bay as he strug- 
gled defensively throughout 
the season. Bay was never 
the best fielder to begin with 
but he was reliable. In his 
first 467 career games. Bay 
committed just nine errors. 
This season he committed 
eight in just 142 games. 

If the Pirates hope to 
contend anytime soon they 



need J- Bay to revert to pre- 
vious form or they must deal 
him now before he wipes out 
all of his value. 

Biggest Bust and the Buccy 
goes to... 
KS: Jason Bay 

While this could get lumped 
in with Biggest 

Disappointment, there were 
just too many sore spots to 
only have one. The sad 
thing is that this award 
could easily be spread out 
among the likes of Chris 
Duffy, Salomon Torres, Tony 
Armas Jr, etc. However, 
Jason Bay gets the nod here 
for his not-so All-Star sea- 
son of .247, 21 HRs, and 84 
RBIs. 

All of these are well 
under Bay's career totals as 
he had what is undoubtedly 
his worst season as a Pirate. 
In addition. Bay's play in 
the outfield was less than 
sterling. He looked less like 
a cornerstone player, and 
more like someone who 
might find himself on the 
trading block this winter. 
EB: Dave Ldttlefield 
It would be too easy to say 
the entire team was the 
biggest disappointment as 
they once again they failed 
to live up to pre-season 



hype. Truth is Littlefield 
was supposed to turn this 
team around and six years 
later they've improved from 
62 wins to 68. 

He didn't draft the best 
players available, and the 
free agent pickups were 
atrocious. While he did 
make successful moves like 
getting Freddy Sanchez for 
Jeff Suppan, and Jason Bay 
for Brian Giles, Littlefield's 
success was few and way too 
far between. In the end he 
cost this team, which now 
moves on to year 16 of the 
"rebuilding" process. 

Biggest Storyline to Watch 
this Off-Season and the 
Buccy goes to... 
KS: Who's the Manager? 

Speculation is already high 
as to whether or not manag- 
er Jim Tracy will keep his 
job. According to the Post- 
Gazette, the contracts for 
his coaching staff are up 
after this season. After fail- 
ing to fix Oliver Perez and 
Kip Wells, as well as seem- 
ingly sending Zach Duke out 
of control, it could be a long- 
shot for pitching coach Jim 
Colborn to come back. 

Tracy's contract is up 
after next season, but his 
chances to return are 50/50 



at best. Early word is that 
Cleveland third base coach 
Joel Skinner is a favorite to 
replace Tracy. 

EB: Will the new front office 
really change anything? 
Over the last 15 years, noth- 
ing much has gone right for 
this franchise on or off the 
field. That blame can be 
spread between players, 
managers and the front 
office for not putting the 
best possible team on the 
field. 

Kevin McClatchy and 
Dave Littlefield are gone 
and manager Jim Tracy 
could be soon to follow. That 
being said the new front 
office of Frank Coonelly and 
Neal Huntington must show 
competence in signing the 
correct pieces to fit into the 
talent already at the major 
league level as well as draft- 
ing the best available play- 
ers, unlike their predeces- 
sors who were too concerned 
with the contracts, those top 
draft picks would request. 
Granted the change won't 
happen over night but the 
first off-season for this 
regime will be an important 
and telling one. 



75, 75 • 150, senior Justin 
Moose 79, 72 - 151, and 
freshman Jared Schmader 
who shot a 76, 77 - 153. 

On October 1, the team 
competed in and won the 
Westminster Invitational 
with a score of 304. 
Carnegie Mellon University 
finished second to Clarion 
with a 307. 

Sanner was l-underpar 
and shot 71, to finish second 
individually behind 

Carnegie Mellon's Alex 
Timmons. Mullens fired a 



77, with Moose ahd 
Schmader carding 78 
apiece. Justin Cameron fol- 
lowed closely with a score of 
81. 

The Golden Eagles will 
travel to the Robert Morris 
Invitational on October 8-9 . 
The event will be the men's 
last regular season tourna- 
ment of the year. Clarion 
will then participate in the 
PSAC championships 

October 21-22 at Wrendale 
Country Club. 




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Stop, drop, and 
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Pep rally kicks off 

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Remember the 
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One copy free 



THECL 



Clarion Pennsylvania 16214 




Volunne 94 Issue 5 



October 11 2007 



CUP hosts second annual Hip-Hop symposium 

Featuring Grammy nominated artist as keynote speaker 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 10 - Clarion 
University has prepared an 
extensive schedule for the 
second annual Hip-Hop 
Symposium on Thursday, 
Oct. 18, including Yolanda 
"Yo-Yo" Whitaker, T. Denean 
Sharpley-Whiting, John 
Miller and Brian Cook. 

Students are encour- 
aged to reserve seats for the 
upcoming symposium online 
through the symposium's 
Web site, http7/jupiter.clari- 
on.edu/~hiphopsymp. More 
information pertaining to 
the symposium can be found 
at the Web site or by con- 
tacting professor of mass 
media arts and journalism, 
Dr. Joanne Washington, at 
814-393-1883 or hiphop- 
symp@clarion.edu. 

This year's symposium 
is intended to answer many 
of the questions expressed 
at last year's symposium 
and to touch on issues that 
continue to be negelected, 
according to Washington. 

"People wanted to know 
about the roots of Hip-Hop 
and about the role women 




Clarion University will nost their second annual Hip-Hop Symposium on Oct. 18. (The Clarion 
Call/ University Relations) 

play . in the Hip-Hop c\il:„ isJiJ^eS' head on and put^ ffont." ' 
ture," said Washington. "We together a program to bring Washington said the 

decided to tackle those these topics to the fore- symposium is targeted to 



those that feel greatly influ- 
enced by Hip-Hop, but also 
those that feel they are not 
affected at all by Hip-Hop. 

"I think both groups will 
be suprised at how Hip-Hop 
influences our culture," said 
Washington. 

The 2007 symposium, 
"Hip-Hop: Roots, Relevance, 
and Reaction," differs from 
last year's symposium in 
that it is funded completely 
by the university this year. 

Washington said, "I 
think students see this as 
an opportunity to become 
involved in a dynamic and 
cross-cultural event." 

Major supports that 
Washington noted were the 
Black Student Union and 
student senate. 

The symposium will 
begin at 9:30 a.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room (MPR) with a wel- 
come from Dr. John Groves. 
College of Education Dean. 

The first session will 
feature the "Hip-Hop: 
Beyond Beats and Rhymes 
Documentary," by filmmak- 
er Byron Hurt. 

See "HIP-HOP" 
continued on page 2. 



Clarion to purchase 
wireless mic system 



lass Hifoes Roefcs CUP 



Jamie Ricliard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJmrichard@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 8- Student 
senate approved the alloca- 
tion of $13,885.08 to Clarion 
University for the purchas- 
ing of a wireless microphone 
system, equipped with 18 
headpieces. 

The allocation caused 
much debate at the meeting, 
due to the confusion as to 
which organization was 
actually making the 
request. 

The original request 
was made to benefit Clarion 
University's Show Choir , 
which is a traveling organi- 
zation that visits high 
schools, the Autumn Leaf 
Festival Pageant and many 
other venues. A wireless 
microphone system is neces- 
sary for the choir to travel 



and to be famililar with 
other systems when they 
travel. 

Currently, the only wire- 
less microphone system in 
the Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts 
Building belongs to the the- 
atre department. 

Although the music 
department does occasional- 
ly use this system for events 
in Marwick-Boyd, the sys- 
tem is not well-equipped for 
travel and functions best in 
the Little Theatre of 
Marwick-Boyd. 

During discussion on 
the allocation, problems 
arose as to precisely which 
organization was making 
the request because student 
senate can only give funding 
to Recognized Student 
Organizations (RSOs). 

See "MIC" 
continued on page 2. 




PRSSA to campaign for statewide ciiaiienge 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyori@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 9 - Signing 
as an organ donor used to 
require a trip to the local 
Department of Motor 
Vehicles! however, individu- 
als can now do this online 
and the Public Relations 
Studer^t Society of America 
(PRSSA) at CUP plans to 



raise awareness about this 
new convenience. 

The Clarion University 
Chapter of PRSSA is getting 
involved by partaking in a 
statewide challenge among 
colleges. 

The challenge aims to 
see which college can get the 
most people to sign up to be 
organ donors. 

Spokesperson for the 
statewide challenge and 
Web portal, Mary Ann 



Bohrer said they are cur- 
rently working on finalizing 
the challenge. 

"We [PRSSA] are very 
excited about it and we're 
excited to be working with 
the school and the commu- 
nity because organ donating 
can help to save a lot of 
lives," said Shandrial 
Hudson, senior mass media 
arts and journalism major 
and PRSSA newsletter edi- 
tor. 



The PRSSA organiza- 
tion is awaiting the finaliza- 
tion of the statewide chal- 
lenge before they can kick 
off their campaign on cam- 
pus. Once finalized. PRSSA 
intends to host an open 
social event for students 
across campus; however, 
they are just in the planning 
stage as of now. 

"This is definitely a real- 
ly important thing, as organ 
donations are essential in 




fhefKntiVt 



Thursday 




nm^omaofmrn 



saving the lives of many," 
said Natalie Kennell, 
PRSSA Vice President of 
Public Relations and senior 
mass media arts and jour- 
nalism major. 

According to the Web 
portal states, more than 
92,000 people nationwide 
are waiting for an organ 
donation to save their lives. 

See "PRSSA" 
continued on page 2. 



«• •« 











■Ml 




■ Regional director of 
the Bureau of Narcotics 
Im'estigation and Drug 
Control, Elaine Surma 
will host a presentation 
about internet predators, 
drugs, and alcohol on 
Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. in the 
Gemmell MPR. 

n Professor of manage- 
ment at CUP, Dr. Miguel 
R. OlivasLugan, 

received the highest pos- 
sible evaluation from the 
Brazilian Educational 
Systems to a research 
based book, on his co- 
edited book, Successful 
Professional Women of 
the Americas. 

m CUP will host the sec- 
ond annual Northwest 
PA Geographic 

Information Systems 
Conference on Friday, 
Oct. 19, which will fea- 
ture keynote speakers, 
Peirce Eichelberger and 
Jim Kuudson. 

■ An exibit of works 
from the Manchester 
Craftsmen's Guild will be 
feeatured in the 
University Gallery in 
Carlson Library from 
Oct. 15- Nov. 16 

m The WCUB-TV televi- 
sion truck has been 
remodeled by associate 
professor of MMAJ, Dr. 
Robert Nulph and chief 
engineer of WCUC-FM, 
Bruce Exley, making it 
"one of the most adapt- 
able video production 
remote units in colleges 
in Pa.," according to 
Nulph. 

■ Senior, liberal studies 
major, Danny Diveley 
and senior speech 
pathology major, Kady 
Jones were announced as 
the 2007 Homecoming 
King and Queen at the 
Pep Rally on Oct. 4. 

a Jamie Wolf of Clarion 
University and Mike 
Klobucher of Ferris State 
University have been 
named the top female 
and male Division II 
ScholarAthletes of the 
Year by the Division II 
Conference 
Commissioners 
Association. (See the Oct. 
18 issue for a full story.) 

■The CUP Venango 
Campus will host a lec- 
ture by college-life legal 
expert C.L. Lindsay on 
Campus Computing: 
Prom Free Speech to 
Pacebook on Tuesday, 
Oct. 16, 2007 at 7:30 p.m. 



Saturday 






MOS'. 



• • 






I^i,^ 



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mrmmm^^mmmmm 



Page 10 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 4. 2007 



Sfirts 



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Soccer defeats Gannon 1-0, remains In third place in PSAC-West 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

8jckovalovs®clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct 2 - The 
Golden Kagles shut out 
their noirconfiTencc oppo- 
nent, the (Jannon Knights 
(7-3-1). 1-0 at home on 
Sunday Sept. 80. 

Despite heing outshot 
20-6 and having only one 
corner kick to Gannon's 
seven, Clarion was ahle to 
win it on an unassisted 
cross shot goal from fresh- 
man Jill Miller in the 49th 
minute. 

It was Miller's third goal 
of the .season, giving her a 
total of six points, both team 
highs. Miller and teammate 
Chelsea Wolff both had two 
shots on goal. Four other 
Golden Eagles each had one 
shot. 

Senior goalkeeper Jess 
Reed continued her strong 
play, posting her fourth 
shutout of the season, tying 




Sophomore Caitiin Borden is pictured above handling the ball in one of the Golden Eagles recent games. Clarion won Sunday Sept. 
30 1-0 against Gannon University. Clarion's next home match will be Thursday Oct. 4. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 



a career high that she set 
last year. She made a total 
of 6 saves in the game, 
increasing her season total 
to 52. If she continues at 
her current pace, she will 
set career highs in save per- 
centage (.800) and goals 
against average (2.02) this 
season. 



Clarion had a game the 
next day against a 
FSAC-West conference 
opponent, the Lock Haven 
Eagles. Lock Haven 

avenged a loss to Clarion 
earlier in the season by 
shutting out the Golden 
Eagles 1-0. 

The loss dropped Clar- 



ion's record to 2-3-1 in 
PSAC-West play and 4-5-2 
overall. 

Arielle Gordon headed 
in the only goal of the game 
in the 70th minute off of a 
pass from Katie Decker. 

Clarion gave up a total 
of twenty four shots, the sec- 
ond most all season. Nine of 



Lock Haven's 14 players had 
•shots on goal. Katie Decker, 
Lindsay Blessing, and 
Rebekah Stonecypher each 
had four shots, while 
Clarion only posted eight 
shots. Rebecca Downs led 
the way with three, followed 
by Chelsea Wolff who added 
two of her own. 



In the win for Lock 
Haven, senior goalkeeper 
Emily Wagner became Lock 
Haven's all-time leading 
career saves leader. She 
ended the day with eight 
saves, improving her total to 
300 in her career. 

Clarion is now tied for 
third place in the 
PSAC-West with Lock 
Haven. Both have seven 
points off of two wins and 
one tie. Slippery Rock 
maintains a strong lead 
with 19 points, followed by 
Edinboro at 11. 

The Golden Eagles stay 
home to face PSAC-West 
conference opponent 

California (2-10-1, 0-5- 1) on 
Thursday and nonconfer- 
ence opponent West Virginia 
Wesleyan (9-3-1) Sunday 

They will then travel to 
Edinboro (6-2-3, 3-1-2) on 
Wednesday. Clarion has 
already beaten California 
and tied Edinboro earlier in 
the season. 



One copy free 



Golden Eagles football falls to 12th ranked California 56-0 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscritchf@clarion.eclu 

CALIFORNIA Sept. 29- 
Last Saturday night, the 
inexperience showed for the 
Golden Eagles as they lost 
56-0 to California at 
Adamson Stadium. The 
game marked the 

PSAC-West opener for both 
teams. 

The big news for 
Clarion, was not good news. 
Quarterback Tyler Huether 
injured his hand in the first 
half, and was replaced by 
backup Gino Rometo. This 
game was extremely one- 
sided, and was dominated 
from start to finish by the 
Vulcans. 

California had 519 
yards of offense, including 



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The Golden Eagles football team dropped their record to 0-5 
with their 56-0 loss at 12th ranked California. Clarion returns 
home this week to host Shippensburg (0-5) on October 6. (The 
Clarion Ca///Archive Photo) 



393 yards on the ground and 
126 through the air. 
Quarterback Joe Ruggiero 
went 10-15 for 104 yards 
and a touchdown, and run- 
ning back Brandon 



for 177 yards and three 
touchdowns. 

Both Ruggiero and 
Lombardy, along with the 
rest of the Vulcan starters, 
sat out the entire second 



Clarion, on the other 
hand, had strikingly differ- 
ent statistics. They had 84 
total yards, including 22 
rushing yards and 62 pass- 
ing yards. Quarterback 
Tyler Huether, before he 
was injured, went 3-9 for 24 
yards, and backup Gino 
Rometo completed five of 14 
passes for 34 yards. 
Running back Eddie 
Emmanuel also rushed 17 
times for 36 yards. 

In the first quarter, 
after a Clarion punt, 
California drove 80 yards in 
six plays and went ahead 7- 
on a 40-yard touchdown 
run by Lombardy. 

Later in the first. 
Clarion had the ball again 
and got two first downs, but 
were tripped up by a holding 
penalty and were eventually 



first quarter, the game was 
still close, California only 
led the Golden Eagles 7-0. 

The second quarter, 
however, was an entirely 
different ballgame. 

Jermaine Move returned a 
punt for 51 yards to the 
Clarion 22 yard line. Four 
plays later, Lombardy car- 
ried to the goal line and 
fumbled, but teammate 
Nate Forse recovered in the 
end zone with 11^56 remain- 
ing to put the Vulcans ahead 
14-0. 

Lombardy then scored 
on touchdown runs of 1 and 
36 yards to put California 
ahead 28-0 with 3:59 left in 
the second. Later in the sec- 
ond, Nate Forse caught an 
18-yard touchdown pass 
from Ruggiero for a 35-0 
lead. 



blocked a Clarion punt and 
Patrick Swearinger recov- 
ered the ball in the end zone 
for a 42-0 lead at halftime. 

California added on 
another two scores in the 
second half to complete a 56- 
win. 

California dominated 
Clarion in just about every 
statistical category. 

The Vulcans compiled 
26 first downs to Clarion's 
seven, and California con- 
trolled the ball for 35as 
compared to 22' 14 for 
Clarion. 

The Golden Eagles 
return home to face the 
Shippensburg Raiders, who 
are also 0-5, in hopes of 
righting their ship on 
Homecoming Day at A.L.F. 
at 2 p.m. this coming 
Saturday. 



Lombardv rushed 16 times half. 



forced to punt. After the The Vulcans then 



Golf team finishes in top two in each of last two tournaments 



Demise Simens 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_clnsimens@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 3 - On 
September 24-25, the golf 



team headed to 

Moundsville, WV, to com- 
pete in the Wheeling Jesuit 
Tournament. 

The Golden Eagles fin- 
ished tied for second with 
Concord with a score of 595. 



Millersville shot a 593 and 
won the event. 

On the first day of com- 
petition, Clarion finished 
with a score of 308 and 
wrapped up the next day 
with a tournament low of 



287. Sophomore Nick 
Sanner led the way with 78, 
70 - 148, and senior Preston 
Mullens followed closely 
with a 79, 70-149. 

Other Clarion scores 
were junior Justin Cameron 



continued from 
"PIRATES" on page 9. 

That certainly was not 
the case this season as he 
went 3-8 with a 5.53 ERA. 
To add further insult, Duke 
missed parts of the season 
due to injury. Seemingly a 
shell of his 8-2 rookie self. 
Duke seems destined to join 
the likes of Francisco 
Cordova and Kris Benson in 
Pirates lore. 
EB: Jason Bay 
Since his rookie of the year 
performance in 2004, Bay 
seemed to be the one player 
the Pirates could always 
count on. With probably his 
best support surrounding 
him in the lineup this sea- 
son Bay put up career lows 
in home runs, total bases, on 
base percentage, slugging 
percentage and batting 
average. 

The woe's weren't just at 
the dish for Bay as he strug- 
gled defensively throughout 
the season. Bay was never 
the best fielder to begin with 
but he was reliable. In his 
first 467 career games. Bay 
committed just nine errors. 
This season he committed 
eight in just 142 games. 

If the Pirates hope to 
contend anytime soon they 



need J -Bay to revert to pre- 
vious form or they must deal 
him now before he wipes out 
all of his value. 

Biggest Bust and the Buccy 
goes to... 
KS: Jason Bay 

While this could get lumped 
in with Biggest 

Disappointment, there were 
just too many sore spots to 
only have one. The sad 
thing is that this award 
could easily be spread out 
among the likes of Chris 
Duffy Salomon Torres, Tony 
Armas Jr, etc. However, 
Jason Bay gets the nod here 
for his not-so All-Star sea- 
son of .247, 21 HRs, and 84 
RBIs. 

All of these are well 
under Bay's career totals as 
he had what is undoubtedly 
his worst season as a Pirate. 
In addition. Bay's play in 
the outfield was less than 
sterling. He looked less like 
a cornerstone player, and 
more like someone who 
might find himself on the 
trading block this winter. 
EB: Dave Littlefield 
It would be too easy to say 
the entire team was the 
biggest disappointment as 
they once again they failed 
to live up to pre-season 



hype. Truth is Littlefield 
was supposed to turn this 
team around and six years 
later they've improved from 
62 wins to 68. 

He didn't draft the best 
players available, and the 
free agent pickups were 
atrocious. While he did 
make successful moves like 
getting Freddy Sanchez for 
Jeff Suppan, and Jason Bay 
for Brian Giles, Littlefield's 
success was few and way too 
far between. In the end he 
cost this team, which now 
moves on to year 16 of the 
"rebuilding" process. 

Biggest Storyline to Watch 
this Off-Season and the 
Buccy goes to... 
KS: Who's the Manager? 

Speculation is already high 
as to whether or not manag- 
er Jim Tracy will keep his 
job. According to the Post- 
Gazette, the contracts for 
his coaching staff are up 
after this season. After fail- 
ing to fix Oliver Perez and 
Kip Wells, as well as seem- 
ingly sending Zach Duke out 
of control, it could be a long- 
shot for pitching coach Jim 
Colborn to come back. 

Tracy's contract is up 
after next season, but his 
chances to return are 50/50 



at best. Early word is that 
Cleveland third base coach 
Joel Skinner is a favorite to 
replace Tracy. 

EB: Will the new front office 
really change anything? 
Over the last 15 years, noth- 
ing much has gone right for 
this franchise on or off the 
field. That blame can be 
spread between players, 
managers and the front 
office for not putting the 
best possible team on the 
field. 

Kevin McClatchy and 
Dave Littlefield are gone 
and manager Jim Tracy 
could be soon to follow. That 
being said the new front 
office of Frank Coonelly and 
Neal Huntington must show 
competence in signing the 
correct pieces to fit into the 
talent already at the major 
league level as well as draft- 
ing the best available play- 
ers, unlike their predeces- 
sors who were too concerned 
with the contracts, those top 
draft picks would request. 
Granted the change won't 
happen over night but the 
first off-season for this 
regime will be an important 
and telling one. 



75, 75 - 150, senior Justin 
Moose 79. 72 - 151, and 
freshman Jared Schmader 
who shot a 76. 77 - 153. 

On October 1, the team 
competed in and won the 
Westminster Invitational 
with a score of 304. 
Carnegie Mellon University 
finished second to Clarion 
with a 307. 

Sanner was l-underpar 
and shot 71, to finish second 
individually behind 

Carnegie Mellon's Alex 
Timmons. Mullens fired a 



77, with Moose and 
Schmader carding 78 
apiece. Justin Cameron fol- 
lowed closely with a score of 
81. 

The Golden Eagles will 
travel to the Robert Morris 
Invitational on October 8-9 . 
The event will be the men's 
last regular season tourna- 
ment of the year. Clarion 
will then participate in the 
PSAC championships 

October 21-22 at Wrendale 
Country Club. 




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Clarjon Pennsylvania 16214 



Vofufiw 94 Issue 5 



CUP hosts second annual Hip-Hop symposium 

Featuring Grammy nominated artist as l<eynote speai(er 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 10 -Clarion 
University has prepared an 
extensive schedule for the 
second annual Hip-Hop 
Symposium on Thursday. 
Oct. 18. including Yolanda 
"Yo-Yo" Whitaker. T. Denean 
SharpleyWhiting. John 
Miller and Brian Cook. 

Students are encour- 
aged to reserve seats for the 
upcoming symposium online 
through the symposium's 
Web site, httpV/jupiter.clari- 
on.edu/'-hiphopsymp. More 
information pertaining to 
the symposium can be found 
at the Web site or by con- 
tacting professor of mass 
media arts and journalism. 
Dr. Joanne Washington, at 
814-393-1883 or hiphop- 
symp'i' clarion.edu. 

This year's symposium 
is intended to answer many 
of the questions expressed 
at last year's symposium 
and to touch on issues that 
continue to be negelected. 
according to Washington. 

"People wanted to know 
about the roots of Hip- Hop 
and about the role women 




Clarion University will nosi their second annual Hip-Hop Symposium on Oct. 18. (The Clarion 

Call/ University Relations) 

play in the Hip-Hop cuV isaiics head on and put^ front." ' 

ture." said Washington. "We together a program to bring Washington said the 

decided to tackle those these topics to the fore- symposium is targeted to 



those that feel greatly infiu- 
enced by Hip-Hop. but al.so 
those that feel they are not 
affected at all by Hip-Hop. 

"I think both groups will 
hi' suprised at how Hip-Hop 
infiuences our culture," said 
Washington. 

The 2007 symposium. 
"Hip- Hop: Hoots. Relevance, 
and Reaction." differs from 
last year's symposium in 
that it is funded completely 
by the university this year. 

Washington said. "1 
think students see this as 
an opportunity to become 
involved in a dynamic and 
cross-cultural event." 

Major supports that 
Washington noted were the 
Black Student Union and 
student senate. 

The symposium will 
begin at 9^30 a.m. in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
Room (MPR) with a wel- 
come from Dr. John Groves. 
College of Education Dean. 

The first session will 
feature the "Hip- Hop: 
Beyond Beats and Rhymes 
Documentary" by filmmak- 
er Byron Hurt. 

See "HIP'HOP" 
continued on page 2. 



Clarion to purchase 
wireless mic system 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmricharcl@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 8 - Student 
senate approved the alloca- 
tion of $13,885.08 to Clarion 
University for the purchas- 
ing of a wireless microphone 
system, equipped with 18 
headpieces. 

The allocation caused 
much debate at the meeting, 
due to the confusion as to 
which organization was 
actually making the 
request. 

The original request 
was made to benefit Clarion 
University's Show Choir . 
which is a traveling organi- 
zation that visits high 
schools, the Autumn Leaf 
Festival Pageant and many 
other venues. A wireless 
microphone system is neces- 
sary for the choir to travel 



and to be famililar with 
other systems when they 
travel. 

Currently, the only wire- 
less microphone system in 
the Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts 
Building belongs to the the- 
atre department. 

Although the music 
department does occasional- 
ly use this system for events 
in Marwick-Boyd, the sys- 
tem is not well-equipped for 
travel and functions best in 
the Little Theatre of 
Marwick-Boyd. 

During discussion on 
the allocation, problems 
arose as to precisely which 
organization was making 
the request because student 
senate can only give funding 
to Recognized Student 
Organizations (RSOs). 



See "M/C" 
continued on page 2. 



Gym Class Heroes Rocks CUP 




Checl< out the story on page 5 about the CampusFest concert that featured Gym Class Heroes 
on Oct. 10 in Tippin Gym. (The Clarion Call/ Angela Kelly) 



PRSSA to campaign for statewide challenge 



Gretchen Beth Yori 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gbyori@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 9 - Signing 
as an organ donor used to 
require a trip to the local 
Department of Motor 
Vehicles; however, individu- 
als can now do this online 
and the Public Relations 
Student Societv of America 
(PRSSA) at CUP plans to 



raise awareness about this 
new convenience. 

The Clarion University 
Chapter of PRSSA is getting 
involved by partaking in a 
statewide challenge among 
colleges. 

The challenge aims to 
see which college can get the 
most people to sign up to be 
organ donors. 

Spokesperson for the 
statewide challenge and 
Web portal. Mary Ann 



Bohrer said they are cur- 
rently working on finalizing 
the challenge. 

"We IPRSSA] are very 
excited about it and we're 
excited to be working with 
the school and the commu- 
nity because organ donating 
can help to save a lot of 
lives." said Shandrial 
Hud,son. senior mass media 
arts and journalism major 
and PRSSA newsletter edi- 
tor. 



The PRSSA organiza- 
tion is awaiting the finaliza- 
tion of the statewide chal- 
lenge before they can kick 
off their campaign on cam- 
pus. Once finalized. PRSSA 
intends to host an open 
social event for students 
across campus^ however, 
they are just in the planning 
stage as of now. 

"This is definitely a real- 
ly important thing, as organ 
donations are essential in 



saving the lives of many." 
said Natalie Kennell. 
PRSSA Vice President of 
Public Relations and senior 
mass media arts and jour- 
nalism major. 

According to the Web 
portal states, more than 
92.000 people nationwide 
are waiting for an organ 
donation to save their lives. 

See "PRSSA" 
continued on page 2. 





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■ Regional director of 
the Bureau of Narcotics 
Investigation and Drug 
Control, Elaine Surma 
will host a presentation 
about internet predators, 
drugs, and alcohol on 
Oct. 18 at 7 p.m. in the 
Gemmell MPR, 

■ Professor of manage- 
ment at CUP, Dr. Miguel 
R. Olivas-Lugan, 
received the highest pos- 
sible evaluation from the 
Brazilian Educational 
Systems to a research 
based book, on his co- 
edited book, Successful 
Professional Women of 
the Americas. 

m CUP will host the sec- 
ond annual Northwest 
PA Geographic 

Information Systems 
Conference on Friday, 
Oct. 19, which will fea- 
ture keynote speakers, 
Peirce Eichelberger and 
Jim Knudson. 

■ An exibit of works 
from the Manchester 
Craftsmen's Guild will be 
feeatured in the 
University Gallery in 
Carlson Library from 
Oct. 15- Nov. 16 

■ The WCUB-TV televi- 
sion truck has been 
remodeled by associate 
professor of MMAJ, Dr. 
Robert Nulph and chief 
engineer of WCUC-FM, 
Bruce Exley, making it 
"one of the most adapt- 
able video production 
remote units in colleges 
in Pa.," according to 
Nulph. 

■ Senior, liberal studies 
major, Danny Diveley 
and senior speech 
pathology major, Kady 
Jones were announced as 
the 2007 Homecoming 
King and Queen at the 
Pep Rally on Oct. 4. 

■ Jamie Wolf of Clarion 
University and Mike 
Klobucher of Ferris State 
University have been 
named the top female 
and male Division II 
Scholar-Athletes of the 
Year by the Division II 
Conference 
Commissioners 
Association. (See the Oct. 
18 issue for a full story.) 

■The CUP Venango 
Campus will host a lec- 
ture by college-life legal 
expert C.L. Lindsay on 
Campus Computing: 
From Free Speech to 
Facebook on Tuesday, 
Oct. 16, 2007 at 7:30 p.m. 









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Page 2 



Tffl: CLARION CALL 



October 11, 2007 



lews 



Faculty senate discusses construction plans 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s„ieerickson@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Pa.. -The recent 
faculty senate meeting 
focused their discussion on 
the current construction at 
CUP. 

Recently there has been 
preparation going on for the 
construction of a new dining 
hall and the demohtion of 
Campbell Hall, which has 
had various effects on the 
campus. 

Last week, construction 
workers started putting up 
fencing near Ballentine 



Hall. 

There are plans to build 
a new dining hall at a new 
location while Chandler 
Dining Hall is still being 
used. 

Construction continues 
to effect parking across 
campus. 

"There are fewer com- 
plaints this year about park- 
ing compared to last year," 
said Sue Coursin. "There 
are still a few complaints, 
but most people are okay 
with the parking situation." 

However, in the near 
future the faculty will be 
losing even more parking 
due to the construction. 



Also, they will now have 
to use a new road by 
Carrier. 

The president 

announced that the 
approved appropriations 
request will hopefully be 
approved next Thursday 
and the new provost search 
is still underway. 

An announcement by 
the CCPS that said the new 
chair of the General 
Education Council is Jane 
Philips. 

In other announce- 
ments, there will be hear- 
ings scheduled for Jan. 10, 
July 24, and August 20. 

The January hearing is 



for suspensions that occur 
in the fall/winter semester, 
and the July and August 
hearings are for suspensions 
that occur in the spring. 
Appeals can be done in writ- 
ing or by showing up in per- 
son. 

The last topic of discus- 
sion was the update from 
the CCR Committee. 
Recommendations for the 
new UTAC committee mem- 
bers were announced and 
then approved. 

Also the nominees for 
the Search Committee were 
announced, but are await- 
ing approval by President 
Grunenwald. 



"PRSSA" continued 
from front page. 

Individuals that wish to reg- 
ister as an organ donor can 
do so by accessing 



www.donatelife-pa.org. 

The Ordinary People, 
Extraordinary Power cam- 
paign is a collaborative ini- 
tiative between Gift of Life 
Donor Program (GOL), the 



Center for Organ & 
Recovery Education (CORE) 
and the Pennsylvania 
Departments of Health and 
Transportation. 

It is funded by residents 



of Pennsylvania through 
voluntary contributions 
included with driver's 
license renewals, vehicle 
registrations and state 
income tax filings. 



"MIC" continued from 
front page. 

Due to the fact that the 
Show Choir currently has 
12 members, it does not 
meet the 15 member mini- 
mum requirement and is 
not considered an RSO. 
Rather, Show Choir is part 



of a group of music organi- 
zations, along with 
Madrigal Singers and 
Concert Choir, which all col- 
lectively share an account. 

"All of these organiza- 
tions share Account 414," 
said University music pro- 
fessor Henry Alviani. "The 
microphones are not just to 



benefit Show Choir, but 
everyone who wants to use 
them." Another issue was 
the durabihty of the new 
system. "We don't want to 
buy something we'll just 
have to keep replacing or 
buying new parts for every 
few years," said student 
senate Treasurer, Heather 



Puhalla. 

It was ultimately decid- 
ed that because the system 
was not exclusively for the 
Show Choirs use, it would 
be purchased in the name of 
CUP and can be used by any 
organizatin on campus. The 
motion was passed in a 
unanimous 21-0-0 vote. 



"HIP-HOP" continued 
from front page. 

According to the Clarion 
University Newswire, this 
documentary is a Sundance 
Film Festival Selection and 
has won numerous awards, 
including Best 

Documentary from the San 
Francisco Black Film 
Festival. Washington does 
warn that this film contains 
graphic images and explicit 
language. 

The second session will 
begin at 12:30 p.m. with a 
welcome from Dr. Rachelle 
Prioleau, College of Arts and 
Sciences Dean and will fea- 
ture the forum: "Hip-Hop: 
Created Imagine- Reality 
Check," in the MPR. 

The forum will be led by 
Sharpley-Whiting, the 

author and director of 
African American and 
Diaspora Studies and the 
director of the William T. 
Bandy Center for 

Bandelaire and Modern 
French Studies at 
Vanderbilt University 

The student panel will 
consist of three students, 
including Amil Cook, a grad- 
uate student pursuing a 
master's degree in educa- 
tion; Paulette Ibeka, senior, 
biology major: and Tracey 
Milchick, sophomore, psy- 
chology major. 

At 2 p.m., student sen- 



ate president, Dustin 
McElhattan, a junior biolo- 
gy major, will provide a wel- 
come prior to the second 
showing of "Hip-Hop: 
Beyond Beats and Rhymes," 
in the MPR. 

To round out the after- 
noon, a Slam Poetry 
Workshop will be hosted by 
Miller, co-founder of 
Artfunkles in room 250 in 
Gemmell at 3:30 p.m. Miller 
currently serves as the 
President of the Clarion 
County Arts Council. 

President of the Clarion 
University Black Student 
Union, Cheyenne Patterson, 
a senior mass media arts 
and journalism major will 
provide the welcoming at 
the the last session, "Hip- 
Hop: Taking it back!" 

This session will feature 
Whitaker, one of the first 
female rappers of the 90's 
and serving as her inter- 
viewer will be Brian Cook. 

Whitaker is a Grammy 
nominated artist, who 
began her career as a pro- 
tege of rapper Ice Cube. 
Whitaker is the founder of 

The Intelligent Women's 
Coalition, a radio personali- 
ty of KDAY 93.5 in Los 
Angeles, and the president 
of Fearless Entertainment 
and Yo-Yo Music. Whitaker 
has also recently signed on 
with VH-1 for her own real- 
ity based show entitled. 



Who Will Be the Next 
Female Rapper? 

Cook is a 2003 Clarion 
University graduate of Mass 
Media Arts and Journalism 
(formally communication) 
and is currently the news 
and entertainment corre- 
spondent for American 
Urban Radio, which reaches 
30 million listeners on over 
478 stations across America. 

The Hip-Hop 



Symposium will also feature 
an all day juried art exhibit 
on the first floor of the 
Marwick Boyd Auditorium, 
Student Artist Showcase, 
book signing and sales, and 
the Clarion University radio 
station, WCUC will have a 
live broadcast. 

A symposium break-out 
discussion will be held on 
Monday, Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. in 
Gemmell, room 248. 



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Register to win a Extra Value 
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DI<STGICT AHORNEY 




The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all crim- 
inal investigations as conducted by Clarion 
University Public Safety for the month of 
October 2007. All information can be accessed on 
the Public Safety Web page, 
http7/www.clarion.edu/admin/pubUcsafety/loca- 
tion.shtmL 

■ Oct. 7, at 3:20 a.m., Matthew Ward, 18, of 
Murrysville, Pa., was cited for underage consumption 
of alcohol after University Police found him in the 
wooded area below lot 3. 

■ Oct. 7, at 2:52 a.m., Lydia Hurnyak, 19, of 
Murrysville, Pa., was cited for public drunkenness in 
lots. 

■ Oct. 7, at 12:59 a.m., Robert Mamula, 18, of 
Cannonsburg, Pa., was cited for underage consumption 
of alcohol at Reinhard Villages after University Police 
were called to investigate a noise complaint. 

■ Oct. 7, at 1:42 a.m., Adam Murawski, 19, was cited 
for underage consumption of alcohol after University 
Police approached him at the Nair basketball courts. 

■ Oct. 6, at 2:30 a.m., University Police investigated 
the report of an alleged sexual assault of a female res- 
ident by a known male at Reinhard Villages. 
Prosecution was declined by victim, resulting in no 
charges being filed against the actor. 

■ Oct. 6, at 11:25 p.m., Andrew Strum, 18, of Delmont, 
Pa., was cited for underage consumption of alcohol 
after University Police were requested by the Clarion 
Borough Police to respond to lot U for ^ possible distur- 
bance. 

■ Oct. 6, at 11:24 p.m., Jeffrey Johnson, 18, of 
Delmont, Pa., was cited for underage consumption of 
alcohol after University Police were requested by the 
Clarion Borough Police to respond to lot 11 for a possi- 
ble disturbance. 

■ Oct. 6, at 1:20 a.m., Brian Mosquede, 20, of 
McKeesport, Pa., was cited for underage consumption 
at Reinhard Villages after University Police were 
called to investigate a loud party. 

■ Oct. 6, at 1:20 a.m., Kimberly DuFour, 18, of 
Curwensville, Pa., was cited for underage consumption 
at Reinhard Villages after University Police were 
called to investigate a loud party. 

■ Oct. 6, at 1:20 a.m., Rodney Fought, 18, of Shelby, 
Oh., was cited for underage consumption at Reinhard 
Villages after University Pohce were called to investi- 
gate a loud party. 

■ Oct. 6, at 1:20 a.m., Kimberly Mogush, 19, of 
Trafford, Pa., was cited for underage consumption at 
Reinhard Villages after University Police were called to 
investigate a loud party. 

■ Oct. 6, at 1:20 a.m., Paul Markle, 19, of Latrobe, Pa., 
was cited for underage consumption at Reinhard 
Villages after University Police were called to investi- 
gate a loud party. 

■ Oct. 6, at i:i6 a.m., Casey McCorkle, 19, of Altoona, 
Pa., was cited for underage consumption of alcohol at 
Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 6, at 1:22 a.m., Jocelyn Nastuck, 19, of New 
Kensington, Pa., was issued a non-traffic citation for 
underage consumption of alcohol at Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 6, at 4:20 a.m., James Grilli Jr., 19, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., was cited for underage consumption of 
alcohol and possession and for scattering rubbish. 

■ Oct. 6, at 4:22 a.m., Raymond Thornton, 19, of 
Pittsburgh, Pa., was issued a non-traffic citation for 
underage consumption of aichohol near parking lot 9. 

■ Oct. 5, at 7:45 p.m., Jeffrey Langdon Jr., 19, of 
Harbourcreek, Pa., was cited for underage consump- 
tion of alcohol and public drunkenness at Reinhard 
Villages. 

■Oct. 5, at 6 p.m.. University Police found a 
Roadmaster bike in lot 5. 



Page 3 



Tffi CLARION CALL 



October 11. 2007 



Hfitin 



Asthma: fear around every corner 




Ann Edwards 
Online Editor 

s.amedwardsaclarion.edu 

Allow me to take you 
through the perils and dan- 
gers that life presents when 
one is an asthmatic. 

At seven in the morning 
that annoying buzzing 
sound means that you have 
class today. 

You hit the snooze but- 
ton, roll over and go back to 
sleep. 

Ten minutes later you're 
slowly, ever so slowly, inch- 
ing your way out of bed 
because your roommate is 
up and if she's up you might 
as well be up too. 

You take two pills. One 
is for your allergies which 
are aggravated by the death 
of trillions of leaves that 
mock you with their pretty 
colors. The other is for your 
asthma which is, humorous- 
ly enough, aggravated by 
your allergies to pretty col- 
ored leaves. Then you take 
out the nifty little purple 
diskus that has individual 
doses of powdered medica- 
tion that goes directly into 
your lungs when you inhale 
it. In reality, the powder is 
two medications: one for air- 
way constriction and the 



other is an anti-inflammato- 
ry. 

Why purple? 

Studies show that a pur- 
ple coloring in pharmaceuti- 
cals makes people who have 
to take them feel better 
about it. Not really. 

This medication has 
also decided to spice up its 
warning labels, because of 
the FDA's November 2005 
update, by including death. 
Yes, that's right, by taking 
this medicine to alleviate 
your asthma symptoms you 
may in fact "increase the 
risk of asthma-related 
death." Doesn't that sound 
like fun? 

After medicating your- 
self you throw your new 
HFA albuterol inhaler into 
your shower caddy. Why? 
Simple, the old inhaler with 
chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) 
was found to be bad for the 
environment. And with all 
the asthmatics in the world 
we could really put a dent in 
the ozone layer. 

The reason you take the 
inhaler with you when you 
go shower is an easy answer, 
too. If the humidity is too 
high, there's a chance you'll 
have an asthma attack. 
Ever draw anything on a 
mirror that was steamed up 
after a shower? The steam 



that condenses on the mir- 
ror keeps you from seeing 
your reflection, just like the 
inflamed and constricted 
airways keep air from get- 
ting to your lungs. Using an 
emergency inhaler can be 
the equivalent of wiping off 
the steam from the mirror 
as it brings down the 
swelling and clears the air- 
ways so that you can 
breathe. Which is why 
you'll be glad that you had 
your new not-bad-forthe- 
environment inhaler with 
you if you have a humidity 
induced asthma attack. 

When you come back 
from your potentially dan- 
gerous shower excursion 
you get dressed and pack 
your bag for the day. 

As you check to make 
sure you didn't forget your 
keys, your roommate starts 
her morning chemical and 
death routine. 

Because you have asth- 
ma strong perfumes, 
colognes, lotions and hair 
sprays are off-limits. One 
whiff and you could have an 
attack-and they are called 
attacks for a reason. The 
allergens that you breathe 
in from these socially 
acceptable chemicals, as 
well as those from any 
smokers nearby, attack the 
lining of your bronchial 
tubes causing your body to 
react by producing the IgE 
antibody. The IgE antibody 
causes airway constriction 
and inflammation as it tries 
to defend the body from 
attack. 

Your body basically 
attacks itself to avoid 



drowning in toxic air. 

You haven't even left 
your dorm and already 
you've been met with diffi- 
culties. 

Everywhere you go and 
everything that you do takes 
careful planning to avoid 
having life giving air taken 
away from you. 

Smokers at nearly every 
entryway to nearly every 
building on campus. 

Poorly ventilated class- 
rooms where perfumes, 
colognes and the poisonous 
cloying toxins that smokers 
bring with them everywhere 
they go surround and suffo- 
cate you. 

Keeping up with current 
sciences, understandings of 
and medications for asthma 
is a must. 

The new "black label" on 
popular medicines to treat 
asthma is just one example 
of something that people 
with asthma need to be 
aware of as well as under- 
stand. 

Of the 20 million 
Americans with the chronic 
lung disease asthma, half 
suffer from allergic asthma 
as characterized in the fic- 
tional day aforementioned. 

So the next time you 
take in a lung full of air, step 
into a hot shower or just 
shower yourself in chemi- 
cals, remember that about 
10 million asthmatics are 
looking warily around for 
those potential death 
threats. 

The author is a senior dual 
library science education 
and English major and 
Online Editor of The Call. 



New Orleans trip with the PEC: the 
best time and money spent in college 



Josh Zorich 
Graduate Student 
PEC member 

About two weeks ago, an 
e-mail was sent to every stu- 
dent that is enrolled at 
Clarion University with 
information about a trip to 
New Orleans organized by 
the Political Economy Club 
(PEC). The message stated 
that the trip would occur 
over Thanksgiving break 
and may cost a few hundred 
dollars. To my delightful 
surprise, there were about 
40 individuals who had ten- 
tatively put their names 
down. 

While I am genuinely 
moved that that many peo- 
ple have come forward so 
far, I know that there were 
probably another 200 people 
who saw that e-mail and 
decided against the trip 
because of the timing, but 
most likely the money. 
While this is understand- 
able, I honestly feel that this 
is the real stuff that college 
is supposed to be about: the 
true memories and experi- 
ences that we should take 
advantage of now because in 
a few years as we all find 
jobs, get married, start fam- 
ilies, etc. For most of us this 
type of flexibility will never 
be present again until 
(maybe) retirement. 




As such, I am writing 
this editorial in an attempt 
to provide some facts and 
perspective to the many who 
considered this trip but 
opted not to come along. 

First, the trip is not a 
sightseeing cultural tour. 
We are not going during 
Mardi Gras or to hang out 
on Bourbon Street all week- 
end. The trip is to aid one of 
the many charitable busi- 
nesses that have set up shop 
in New Orleans to clean up 
areas and build houses. 

Second, the group will 
be leaving from Pittsburgh 
International Airport on 
Thanksgiving night. We're 
off to a rocky start already I 
know, but for those who are 
concerned about the time 
spent with family, do you 
think they'd really be that 
angry if you said, "I can't 
make it this year, I'm going 
to New Orleans to build 
houses." I know you could 
also find a way to get to the 
airport that night if you 



really try. The group will be 
down there for four days 
and flying back on Sunday. 
Don't think they haven't 
thought about driving, but it 
would take 18 hours one- 
way. 

Next (and here comes 
the biggest objection, no 
doubt), the trip will cost 
around $400 per person, 
including airfare and food. 
Here we can find many solu- 
tions to the financial prob- 
lem. First, the PEC's cur- 
rent president, Rozylnd 
Vares, has better leadership 
skills than just about any 
student (undergraduate or 
graduate) and a good num- 
ber of faculty and staff that 
I've seen at this school. She 
and her officers have multi- 
ple programs for fundrais- 
ing already in the works. 
Now don't get the wrong 
idea, the club cannot and is 
not paying for people them- 
selves nor will they do the 
work for you. However, they 
believe that with the right 



approach they may be able 
to cover the entire cost for 
everyone through these pro- 
grams. 

This is an interesting 
point to pause for a moment. 
Aside from the aforemen- 
tioned fundraising pro- 
grams, there are two other 
sources of funds that could 
easily cover all, if not a huge 
chunk, of the overall cost. 

The first source is that 
all-important loan refund 
that thousands of us stu- 
dents receive every semes- 
ter for four or more years. 
How much did you keep last 
semester? The one before 
that? What did you spend it 
on? This is not meant to be a 
guilt-trip but rather to offer 
some perspective. If you're 
willing to keep $1,000 every 
semester for clothes, alco- 
hol, spring break, the antic- 
ipation of the new Guitar 
Hero or Halo 3 or just so you 
don't have to get a job, real- 
ly consider using $400 
(probably a lot less if you 
work with the fundraising) 
to take a trip to an area of 
your own country that could 
really use a lot of help. 

The second magical 
source of funds would be 
from our own student sen- 
ate. Many students may not 
know this but the senate's 
philosophy for many, many 
years has been "pay for your 
own volunteer and commu- 



Edilorial, l/tlm to thr Editor mfl I'all on iou 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarion.edu/thecall E-mail: call@clarion.edu 

Executive Board 
2007-2008 



Lindsay Grystar, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-IVIanaging Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 



Stephanie Desmond, Shasta Kurtz, 

Features Editor Photos & Graphics Editor 



Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hill-Wagner 
Adviser 



Staff 

tJ^BlE^ Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Gretchen Beth Yori, 
Jamie Richard, Donald Baum Entertainment: Amy Powers, 
Amber Stockiiolm, Joey Pettine, Jolin Buffone, Travis Lear, 
Racheila Voiiant-Barie Sports; Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield, Denise Simons Featufea: Rob 
Miller, Gregg Bandzuh, Nina Watts Photography and 
Gfaphlcg: Jenifer Poblete, Dominic DeAngeio, Adam Huff, 
Sean IVIontgomery, Stefanie Jula, Andy Lander, Daria 
Kurnal, Jessica Lasher Circutetfon: Nate Laney, Erk Miiier, 
Justin Hogue, Brian Picard, Craig Beary, Jessica Cornman 

Policies 

The Clarion Call Is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
CaH is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and obscen- 
ity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the Editor-tn- 
Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed Ir) this publication are 
those of the writer or speaker, and do not 
necessar/iy reflect the opinions of the news- 
paper staff, student t>ody, Clarion University 
or the community. 



nity service." Vares is in fact 
a current senator and is 
working to have this rule 
changed. If you agree with 
her, write a short note to 
student senate and put it in 
their mailbox, e-mail sena- 
tors or send them a 
Facebook message. I would 
rather my school allocate a 
lot more money for functions 
like this than for the Gym 
Class Heroes (which senate 
funds every year, no offense 
to UAB). 

Lastly, I want you to 
think about New Orleans, 
La. and I want you to think 
about how you perceived 
what your college experi- 
ence would be like. Before 
the end of August 2005 
when Hurricane Katrina hit 
the United States, did any- 
one seriouslv think that the 



US government would allow 
a major city that had been 
literally wiped out by a nat- 
ural disaster remain in 
shambles for over two 
years? TWO YEARS? 
Nearly 2,000 people were 
killed by Katrina. If you can 
afford to part with $400 this 
semester and miss one 
Thanksgiving evening, 
please reconsider this 
opportunity. If nothing else, 
when you're 30-years old 
and telling stories about col- 
lege you can always bring 
up 'that one year when you 
missed Thanksgiving 

because you went to New 
Orleans, you know, when 
they were still cleaning up 
the city and rebuilding.' 

And you know what, 
that's a fine storv to tell. 




The following is in response 
to a Letter to the Editor 
from the Sept. 20 issue of 



The Call: 

While I am sorry that 
mailboxes are being dam- 
aged and destroyed, and am 
quite embarassed that it 
could be possible students 
from the university, one 
should not assume who is 
committing the acts. (You 



know what they say about 
people who assume.) 
However the fact that col- 
lege students are automati- 
cally the perpetrator is not 
why I am upset. As a mem- 
ber of the panhellenic coun- 
cil and avid greek member, I 
take offence that "frats" 



were even thrown into the 
conversation. 

First off they are called 
Fraternities- at least that's 
what they are called here, 
because the Greek men are 
working hard at making a 
stronger image on this cam- 
pus, and to call them frats is 



degrading. Second, all of the 
fraternities recognized by 
the university do not have 
chapter housing. The only 
fraternity house on 5th Ave. 
is no longer recognized. So 
before you are so quick to 
judge and point fingers 
know what you are talking 



about. Don't put the cam- 
pus' fraternities in blame 
because they are not. 

And if your mailbox is 
being destroyed isn't that a 
federal crime and should be 
taken up with the police not 
the university newspaper? 



■SMttlm»K, 



Page 4 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



October 11. 2007 



ftitms 

Clarion professor's study spans the globe 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbandzuh®clarion edu 

Dr. Rose Elaine 
Carbone, a professor of 
mathematics at Clarion 
University, has recently 
completed a research project 
pertaining to some mathe- 
matical issues. 

"As future elementary 
school teachers, they should 
be able to write acceptable 
real life problems for their 
future students," said 
Carbone. "Many students 
merely memorize proce- 
dures that are taught in 
class but miss the underly- 
ing mathematical concepts. 
The research model requires 
the prospective teachers to 
pose their own problems, so 
we become aware of their 
difficulties and are able to 
address them." 

The title of her research 
is "Findings from Two 
Countries Regarding 

Prospective Teachers' 

Knowledge of Addition and 
Division of Fractions." In 
this pilot study, prospective 
elementary teachers were 
asked to write two prob- 
lems^ (l) a story problem 
where students in the ele- 
mentary grades would add 
three-fourths and one-half 



to complete the problem and 
(2) a story problem that 
shows the meaning of 2 1-2. 

It is based on qualita- 
tive research, which is a 
way to measure how much 
one actually knows about 
the topic at hand. 

"This qualitative 

research is important as we 
are studying if prospective 
teachers have a deep under- 
standing of fractions, rather 
than merely determining if 
they can perform the proce- 
dure of completing a prob- 
lem such as one-half plus 
three-fourths," said 

Carbone. 

Dr. Patricia Eaton from 
Stranmillis University 
College in Belfast, Northern 
Ireland was also involved in 
the paper. Carbone met her 
in 2002 at a mathematics 
conference in Sicily. 

Eaton was interested in 
education that was devel- 
oped at Clarion University 
through a United States 
Department of Education 
Fund for the Improvement 
of Post Secondary Education 
(FIPSE) grant, so she visit- 
ed Clarion in 2003 to 
observe the graduate pro- 
gram. 

Since then, Carbone and 
Eaton have continued to col- 
laborate in writing several 
different papers, one which 



was published and present- 
ed at the International 
Congress in Mathematics 
Education (ICME) in 
Copenhagen, Denmark in 
2004. 

They hope to complete 
their current research study 
for the upcoming 2008 
International Congress on 
Mathematics Education 
Conference in Mexico. 

The research paper por- 
trays all of the initial find- 
ings from the United States 
and Northern Ireland. It 
also explains how to under- 
stand concepts rather than 
just knowing what the pro- 
cedures are. 

Last month, Carbone 
traveled to another mathe- 
matics conference, the 
Mathematics Education into 
the 21st Century Project 
International Conference^ 
"Mathematics Education in 
a Global Community." It 
was held at the University 
of North Carolina at 
Charlotte. 

Eaton was unable to 
attend the conference so 
Carbone had to present 
their work without her. 

At the conference, there 
were 32 different countries 
represented with many dif- 
ferent speakers, including 
Spain, Malaysia, Hungary, 
South Africa and Germany. 



"The opportunity to 
attend an international con- 
ference such as this one pro- 
vides interaction with math- 
ematics educators from 
many different countries. 
We found that we share sim- 
ilar problems," said 
Carbone. 

Based on the response 
to the presentation, the pro- 
fessors' research will contin- 
ue with a larger sample of 
prospective teachers 

because the mathematics 
educators from other coun- 
tries are interested in being 
a part of the study. 

"Educators participated 
fully in the discussions and 
were extremely interested 
in seeing additional student 
work examples that were 
presented in the paper due 
to the conference proceed- 
ings page limitation," said 
Carbone. "After the presen- 
tation, several educators 
from different countries 
approached me to continue 
the conversation. A mathe- 
matics educator from South 
Africa is interested in being 
part of our larger study" 

According to Carbone, 
the result of this research 
study is significant to not 
only the area of Clarion, but 
beyond as well. 

"Our research indicates 
that US elementary educa- 




Dr. Rose Carbone (left) with Pamela Austin from the Nelson 
Mandela Metropolitan University in South Africa. She will be help- 
ing Carbone with further research for her paper. (The Clarion 
Call/Courtesy of Dr. Rose Carbone) 



tion students and Northern 
Ireland students share simi- 
lar difficulties with rational 
numbers. These difficulties 
have been documented in 
the mathematics education 
research for at least three 
decades," she said. "We are 
studying how to help these 



prospective teachers to 
deepen their understanding 
of fractions by studying 
their misconceptions and 
difficulties. Then we can 
address their problems 
through our instruction so 
that they will be better pre- 
pared as future teachers." 



Clarion "stops, drops and rolls" this week 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 

When Fire Prevention 
Week is mentioned, images 
of Smokey the Bear are usu- 
ally induced, but fire pre- 
vention is much more than 
tips from an animated griz- 
zly bear. 

Oct. 7-12 is a time 
when knowledge and fire 
prevention tips are spread 
to schools across the nation. 
The hope is to inform stu- 
dents of what to do if a fire 
occurs and how to prevent a 
fire from happening in the 
first place. 

Fire Prevention Week 
began as Fire Prevention 
Day, in remembrance of the 
Great Chicago Fire of 1871. 
The national holiday was 
expanded to a week in 1925 
by President Calvin 
Coolidge. 

It is a week when fire- 
fighters and associations 
can spread knowledge in 
hopes that a tragedy like the 
fire in Chicago will never 
happen again. 

Since January 2000, 75 
people have been killed in 
student housing fire acci- 
dents. 

These incidences can be 
avoided if they follow the 
regulations set by the 
University. 

G. Chad Thomas, the 



facilities coordinator at 
Clarion, said that every- 
thing a student needs to 
know is in the residence hall 
handbook. 

Mishaps can be avoided 
easily, if rules and regula- 
tions are followed. Some are 
simple, like no smoking in 
the dorms. An ash from a 
cigarette could easily catch 
a garbage can full of paper 
on fire. 

There is also a list of 
things prohibited in the 
halls that could cause fires. 
These include candles and 
incense, halogen lamps, 
firearms, firecrackers or 
other explosives, certain 
types of grills, toaster ovens 
and electric heaters. 

There are precautions 
taken in the hall in case of 
emergencies like these. 

"Hall staff does monthly 
fire drills and there are fire 
extinguisher demonstra- 
tions," said Thomas. "Also, 
the halls have fire and heat 
detectors." 

The Clarion Fire 
Department, founded in 
1876, is also doing their 
part. Jamie Bero, Assistant 
Director of Campus Life at 
Clarion University and a 
volunteer firefighter, said 
that some of the events for 
the week began last week, 
when the department gave 
fire truck rides. 

"It's always a popular 
event," said Bero, "This year 



we had more than 600 peo- 
ple turn out." 

Also, the department 
had five trucks in the 
Autumn Leaf Festival 
parade. 

This week, the depart- 
ment has six educational 
sessions planned for local 
elementary schools. 

"Some schools will be 
bringing their classes to the 
fire hall and we will travel 
to the schools that don't," 
said Bero. 

The main point that the 
department will be trying to 
convey is fire safety in the 
home, including "stop, drop 
and roll," having a family 
evacuation plan in case of a 
fire and not going back into 
the house during a fire. 

Another major point 
they hope to get across to 
kids is to not fear firefight- 
ers. 

"I will be in my normal 
clothes, but then I will put 
on the boots, the jacket, the 
mask and the entire uni- 
form," said Bero. "The kids 
will know that they should- 
n't be afraid of the firefight- 
er. We can look pretty intim- 
idating in the entire get-up." 

Also, the Clarion Fire 
Department attended 

Clarion University's theater 
department's presentation 
of 'The Guys" on opening 
night, Oct. 9, because the 
local fire companies were 
honored. 



ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 

Dear Dr. Eagle, 

I'll be starting my student teaching cycle in high schools soon and am concerned 
about the increased rate of drug use in rural areas. Is there anything I should know 
about drug abuse before I begin? 
Signed, 

Much to Learn 

Dear Much to Learn, 

Alcohol and drug addictions for young people progress more rapidly than for adults. 
Often a pattern of problems in the young person's life results from using drugs and alco- 
hol. 

Some warning signs of a problem include drastic changes in attitude, increase in 
truancy and lying about extent/frequency of drinking/drug use. 

If you would like to learn more about addictions, Elaine Surma will be a guest 
speaker on campus. Her presentation on Oct. 18 in the Gemmell MuIti-Purpose Room 
and will be discusing how to identify alcohol and drug addictions. 

Dr. Eagle is written by Valerie Wonderling of the Keeling Health Center. 




Jamie Bero (left), a volunteer firefighter at the Clarion Fire Department, teaches local children about 
fire safety As part of Fire Prevention Week, the firefighters are presenting educational sessions to 
children in the fire station and classrooms. They hope to stress proper fire safety in the home so 
kids will know how to stay safe. (The Clarion Call/Jess Lasher) 



October 11. 2007 



Tm CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



MdHiimit 



VMA's Best New Artist rocks Clarion University 



Lindsay Grystar 
Editor-in-Chief 

s_llgrystar@clarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct. 10 - The 
VMA's best new artist Gym 
Class Heroes (GCH) made a 
stop in Clarion yesterday 
and performed in Tippin 



(lym for the 2007 fall 
CampusFest. 

GCH returned home to 
Geneva N.Y. with VMA's 
Best New Artist of 2007 in 
September. 

The boys performed in 
the area for the Pittsburgh 
Vans Warped Tour in 2006. 

"Pennsylvania is the 




Guitarist Disashi Lumumba-Kasongo of Gym Class Heroes rocks 
out during fall CampusFest. GCH is originally from Geneva, New 
York. GCH uses live music instead of the conventional pre- 
recorded beats of hip-hop. (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



most enormous state, they 
say its Texas but I swear it 
is Pa.," said Matt McGinley, 
GCH drummer. 

Opening the fall 
CampusFest was DJ 
Abilities and The Pack, both 
touring with GCH. They 
each played for about 20 
minutes before passing 
the stage over to the GCH. 

GCH opened the show 
and got the crowd excited 
with "New Friend Request," 
their song about the popular 
Myspace Web site. They 
continued to play favorites 
from their most recent 
album including "Shoot 
Down The Stars," "The 
Queen and I" and "Cupid's 
Chokehold." GCH kept the 
excitement high by mixing 
in some of their older songs, 
off the "Papercut 
Chronicles" album. 

"Both [big shows] and 
college shows have their 
perks. Anyone who wants to 
see us perform can come to 
the big shows, but our mes- 
sage and content is better 
for college kids, they get it," 
said McGinley. 

One of the ending songs 
was "On my own time," 
which McGinley added was 
one of the most fun songs to 
write off the "Cruel As 
School Children" album. 

Vocahst Travis McCoy 
ended the show by surpris- 
ing the crowd and coming 
through the back doors, 
joining the crowd for the 
last song. GCH ended the 
show with high energy with 




Vocalist Travis McCoy of Gym Class Heroes entertained Clarion yesterday in Tippin Gymnamsium. 
GCH, along with The Pack and Dj Abilities, make up the 2007 fall CampusFest. (The Clarion 
Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



their popular song "Clothes 
Off!" McCoy danced with 
the crowd and allowed them 
to sing along. 

"The most entertaining 
part was when Travis went 
to the back and through the 
crowd for the encore. It was 
so exciting," said Jamie 
Bero, UAB adviser. 

McGinley also said their 
current tour is ending and it 
is time to start making a 
new record. They hope to 
have some music out by 
May or June, but also jok- 
ingly said albums are 



"always behind schedule 
and it may be 2010 or 2011" 
before the next one is com- 
pleted. They are touring 
with Fall Out Boy for their 
next tour, and with the 
portable studio that will be 
on their tour bus, hope to 
include Fall Out Boy in 
their upcoming CD. 

"I decided at the very 
last minute to go to the Gym 
Class Heroes show and it 
was definitely a good choice. 
I enjoyed the show and I'm 
glad I decided to attend. 1 
look forward to the next 



CampusFest." said junior 
mass media arts and jour- 
nalism major Maria Miller. 

GCH's next scheduled 
show is in Columbus, Ohio 
on Thursday, Oct. 18. 

UAB sponsors 

CampusFest every year and 
has brought artists such as 
Hinder and Ludacris in the 
past. Another artist will be 
brought in for the spring 
CampusFest. hut the 
specifics have not been 
finalized vet. 



I 

I Pep rally kick * off Clarion homecoming .jhe Qiiys" successfully opens season 



Amber Stockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alstockhol@clarion.edu 

Tippin Gymnasium was 
filled with much excitement 
on Oct. 4 as people gathered 
together and anticipated the 
start of homecoming week- 
end. , 

The pep rally, which is 
known for sparking school 
spirit, kicked off at 7 p.m. 
and brought a variety of stu- 
dents together to meet our 
sports teams and announce 
the homecoming king and 
queen. 

After a majority of the 
crowd donned giant blue 
light-up glasses, provided by 
the University Activities 
Board, the announcer for 
the evening, UAB chair 
Maria D'Acenzo, got the 
night rolling. 

First were performances 
by the Clarion Dance Team, 
the band and the cheerlead- 
ers. As the stands were 
filled with spectators cheer- 



ing, it became hard to hear 
even the announcements. 

Senior dance team 
member and homecoming 
candidate Ashley Crook 
said, "I am always the most 
nervous and excited to 
dance at the homecoming 
pep rally out of all the per- 
formances we do because 
there is such a good student 
turn out." 

The gym was flooded 
with parents, professors, 
students and friends. As 
school spirit was on the rise, 
it was time to introduce 
Clarion's athletes. Coaches 
rose to introduce Golden 
Eagle football, volleyball 
and wrestling teams. 

After the performances 
and sports teams introduc- 
tions, it was time to intro- 
duce the homecoming court. 
Anticipations and nerves 
rose as the 18 members of 
the court and their support- 
ers waited for the king and 
queen verdict. 

Seniors Danny Diveley 
and Kady Jones were 



deemed the 2007 homecom 
ing king and queen. 

Jones said, "[It is] flat- 
tering to be chosen to repre- 
sent this university as their 
homecoming queen. It's nice 
to know you impacted peo- 
ple's lives in a positive way." 

Senior Queen candidate 
Ariel Weaver said, "The pep 
rally was a success that also 
allowed my Phi Sigma 
Sigma alumni sisters to be 
back in Clarion sharing the 
occassion." 

This event allows fresh- 
men students to see what 
older students love about 
homecoming, while seniors 
reflected and remembered 
passing years and appreci- 
ated their last pep rally. 

The pep rally is a way to 
learn about what makes up 
our university, student body 
and school spirit by intro- 
ducing all of our talented 
students and showcasing 
their impact on not only our 
school, but the entire town 
of Clarion. 



Rachella Vollant- Barie 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s ravollantb@clarion.eclu 





Seniors Kady Jones and Danny Diveley were crowned Homecoming King and Queen at the pep 
rally on Oct. 4. (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



"The Guys" 
Director: Robert Levy 
Rating: 5/5 

The Clarion University 
Theatre opens the 2007- 
2008 season this week with 
their dramatic presentation 
of "The Guys." This play 
runs from Oct. 9 to Oct. 13. 

As the audience walks 
in and is seated, they hear 
the sound of fire captains 
asking for a 1020 on their 
men, who are assumed to be 
involved with finding bodies 
and doing other such work 
on the date of Sept. 11.2001. 
There were at least one or 
two firemen who are silent. 

Through these sounds. 
the audience is taken back 
in time to Sept. 11 and 
reminded of the tragic 
events of that day, which 
sets the stage nicely. 

The physical stage is 
constant, yet its simplicity 
adds to the play instead of 
taking away from it. The 
first stage is diamond- 
shaped and is decorated 
with a tan wooden coffee 
table with a white couch 
behind it. 

To the right side, there 
are two white chairs and a 
corner table. The stage has 
white sectional curtains set 



behind the couch and hang- 
ing from the ceiling. 

The play begins when a 
writer, Joan, played by sen- 
ior Drew Leigh Williams, 
describes her constant love 
for the city of New York. She 
also describes the story of 
her life and how she met 
Nick, played by senior Jesse 
Mcllvaine, the fire captain 
who must write eight eulo- 
gies for his men who passed 
on Sept. 11. 

At this point. Nick 
enters, condolences are 
exchanged and Nick's dilem- 
ma of not being able to write 
one sentence to present to 
the families of the deceased 
is unveiled. It becomes 
known through dialogue 
that it has been 12 days and 
no bodies have been found. 
Both characters sit down to 
talk about the firemen who 
have died and construct the 
eulogies. 

We learn that some fam- 
ilies are hopeful but others 
just want to have the memo- 
rial services and begin to 
move on. Here we find the 
names of the first four to 
have memorial services^ Bill 
Dorey, Jimmy Hues, Patrick 
O'Neil and Barney Kepple. 

We discover through the 
hst of names that all of the 
men were much loved and 
that O'Neil is the best friend 
of the captain. 

Joan suggests that the 
men be the focus of the day. 
not the events, and that 
Nick should present some- 
one that everyone knew, not 
a hero or the men who were 
imaged in the media. 

As Nick describes the 
four men, the audience real- 
izes that these were real 
men, not just firefighters or 
heroes and through this I 
received a feel for how per- 
sonal the deaths are. 

The four men described 
are the evervdav man. 




someone who most people 
can relate to. 

Dorey is the ordinary 
guy, the man that was 
depended upon and in turn 
great with the younger 
guys, a humble and critical 
man who everyone loved. 

Hues was the guy who 
was new but willing to 
learn, and learn quickly, 
also a popular young guy. 

0' Neil is the guy who is 
full of life and lives by the 
motto "work, church and 
home." 

Finally, Kepple. the 
handyman who was a wild 
man, and always in trouble. 

Throughout the play, 
the audience sees both 
Joan's angered response to 
the events that happened 
that day and Nick's heart- 
break over the loss of his 
men and his best friend 
(which was shared by the 
families that knew them). 

The play also indicates 
that the audience has a per- 
sonal responsibility to honor 
the men who so willingly 
gave their lives for America. 
Also, that the audience 
should be thankful for the 
ones who continue to serve 
our local neighhoi-hoods. 

Overall. 1 thouKht that 
this play was fantastic. 



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Page 6 



TIffi CLARION CALL 



October 11, 2007 



'TIashdance" collector's edition released on DVD 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers®clarion.edu 




"Flashdance" 
Director: Adrian Lyne 
Rating: 4.5/5 

As I was casually perus- 
ing the shelves of the DVD 
section at Wal-Mart last 
week, a movie titled 
"Flashdance" happened to 
catch my eye. 



The instant I saw the 
DVD of "Flashdance" sitting 
on the shelf, memories of 
middle .school sleepovers 
came flooding back in a 
wave of nostalgia. My 
excitement that the 1983 
classic, and one of my per- 
sonal favorites, had finally 
been released on a collec- 
tor's edition DVD was 
immeasurable. 

The film focuses on a 
young Pittsburgh woman, 
Alex (Jennifer Beals), with a 
passion for dancing. A 
welder in a steel factory by 
day, Alex is a dancer at 
Mawby's Bar at night. Since 
she has no professioal dance 
training, dancing at the 
somewhat shady Mawby's is 
the only way for her to 
express her love of dancing. 

Alex is encouraged to 
further pursue dancing by 
her elderly mentor and for- 



mer dancer, Hanna (Lilia 
Skala). Following Hanna's 
advice, Alex plans on 
attending a prestigious 
dance school. She receives a 
blow to her confidence when 
she finds out that to attend 
the school she must audition 
in front of a panel of judges. 
Losing hope of ever attend- 
ing a dance school, Alex con- 
tinues to dance at Mawby's. 

One night, Alexi's boss, 
Nick (Michael Nouri), hap- 
pens to come to Mawby's 
and sees her dance. He is 
completely captivated by 
her performance and is 
shocked to find out that she 
works for him. The next day, 
Nick cleverly convinces Alex 
to go on a date with him and 
the two quickly fall for each 
other. 

Alex gains confidence 
from her new relationship 
and decides to finally apply 



for the dance school. 
Wanting to give a helping 
hand to his girlfriend, Nick 
uses his connections and 
makes a phone call that 
ensures Alex will get an 
audition. 

While celebrating Alex's 
invitation for an audition, 
Nick lets it slip that he is 
the reason for her success. 
She reacts angrily to the 
news because she wanted to 
earn the audition herself In 
her anger, Alex vows not to 
go to the audition. 

When she goes to visit 
Hanna for guidance, she 
finds out that her mentor 
and friend has died. Alex 
must ultimately decide if 
she can swallow her pride in 
order to follow her dreams of 
furthering her dancing edu- 
cation, or if she wants to 
give up and just remain a 
bar dancer. 



In addition to the fabu- 
lous movie, the 
"Flashdance" collector's 
DVD comes with a host of 
new special features. 
Included in the special fea- 
tures are documentaries 
about the production and 
release of the film. There 
are also interviews with the 
director, producers, writers 
and most of the cast mem- 
bers. Those who love the 
soundtrack will be glad to 
know that a six track music 
CD is also included. 

Overall, the movie is 
still as wonderful as I 
remember it. "Flashdance" 
is a heartwarming story 
with rich themes of women's 
empowerment and following 
your dreams no matter what 
unfortunate circumstances 
stand in your way. 
Everything from the story to 
the setting to the music and 




dances is incredible. While 
the movie has some cheesy 
moments, you can't help but 
love it for its heart. 

The additional special 
features may be a little 
tedious for those who are 
not hardcore "Flashdance" 
fans. However, for those 
that love the movie, they are 
very satisfying in their in 
depth coverage of the pro- 
duction of this amazing 
movie. 



''Madden 08" is the best one thus far 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjdbuffone@clarion.edu 




"Madden 08" 
EA Sports 
Rating: 4.5/5 



In present day 
American society, there are 
few things that stay within 
our youth's attention spans. 



But for 18 years now, a 
national phenomenon has 
captured the interest of 
young males. 

"Madden 2008" was 
released in August and has 
once again dominated the 
sports video game industry. 
With better game play and 
graphics, "Madden 08" is a 
significant improvement 
over the disappointing '07 
installment. The Xbox 360 
version is finally starting to 
turn the corner as a "next 
generation" game. 

Previous versions on the 
Xbox 360 were obviously 
rushed and sloppily put 
together just so the game 
would be out and available 
in stores. EA Sports essen- 
tially had a whole year to 
work on "Madden 08" and 
certainly delivered. 

With the resurrection of 
"Franchise Mode," a player 
can control his or her own 



team and attempt to build a 
dynasty. From moving your 
team to a different city to 
observing revenues, a player 
truly feels like they own the 
team. Another new addition 
to the game is the "Player's 
Icon" aspect. Specifically 
skilled players now have an 
icon surrounding their 
name. For example, Peyton 
Manning being a very smart 
and aware quarterback, has 
a light bulb icon around his 
name that will light up 
whenever he is on a hot 
streak. 

Along with the new 
additions to the game, the 
gameplay itself is much bet- 
ter. No longer will a player 
look like he is running on a 
treadmill whenever he is 
stuck in front of the line, If 
the running back is more of 
a power back, he will auto- 
matically try to push the 
pile. If the running back is 



more of the fast elusive 
type, he will automatically 
juke left or right to try to 
kick it outside. 

Another neat feature 
that EA has added is gang 
tackling. No longer will a 
defender have to tackle the 
ball carrier himself. 
Defensive teammates now 
join in the tackling to make 
a realistic tackle pile. 

Of course, a big attrac- 
tion to the game is 
"Superstar Mode" where a 
gamer can create a player 
and direct them from the 
time they get drafted to the 
time he decides to retire. 
"Madden 08" has improved 
camera angles so that it is 
easier to control your super- 
star and has installed a new 
"Supersim" option that sim- 
ulates all the plays that the 
user's superstar isn't in. 

"Madden 08" is a game 
that can honestly saturate a 




lot of your time if you're a 
football fan. With all the fea- 
tures in the game, you may 
be surprised by how many 
hours you spend playing it. 
Whether you feel like guid- 
ing your own superstar to 
the Hall of Fame, leading 
your own team to the Super 
Bowl or even going online 
and playing other gamers 
around the world, "Madden 
08" is a must-have for all 
sports lovers. 




P£RI/ IJ2sSllllll 

MAS VS. 

MACHINE 

TOUR 

«i:mmi:ll 

MPR 

OCT. 29 

7:ao 




Registration begins Monday, October 15 

Clarion University is offering a winter intersession between the fall 
and spring semesters. All courses offered in the session will be 
delivered on-line. Students do not need to be on campus to take a 
class. It is expected there will be a variety of courses offered but the 
exact list of courses will not be available for a few weeks. This is a 
separate term like the summer pre-session. There is a separate tuition 
charge but no additional financial aid will be available. Students are 
only permitied to take one class. Classes begin Monday, December 
17. after the last day of the fall semester examinations and run until 
.lanuary 7, 2008. 



Winter Intersession offerings 




Class 


Description Instn 


AE 260 Wl 


Career Exploration & Planning 


ARTllOWl 


Visual Arts 


BIOL 224 Wl 


Human Biology 


CHEM211 Wl 


Science & Society 


BSAD240W1 


Legal Environment 1 


ED225W1 


Multicultural Education 


ED563W1 


Reading Pedagogy 


ED567W1 


Sec, Coll & Content Area Reading Instruction 


ED575W1 


Senninar in Children's Literature 


ELED 327 Wl 


Instructional Strategies & Management for Elementary 


ELED 329 Wl 


Education Evaluation & Authentic Assessment 


ES 1 n Wl 


Bosic Earth Science 


LS676W1 


Scholarly & Professional Communication & Publishing 


LS 576 W2 


Intelligence Community & Information Management 


MKTG 491 Wl 


e-Marketing 


MMAJ443W1 


Promotional Writing 


PHIL 215 Wl 


Religions of the World 


PSY2n Wl 


Introduction to Psychology 


SC 100 Wl 


Introduction to Human Communication 


SPED 418 Wl 


Exceptionalities Regular Classroom ID & SER 


THE 253 Wl 


Introduction to Theatre 


WS 100 Wl 


Survey of Women's Studies 



Because most of ihe university will he closed for part of this session, no 
on-campus library or student services will he provided. Office services 
(registrar, bursar, financial aid. computing services, etc.) will be limited and 
nol available for one week in the middle of the term. Credit/No Record will 
not be available during this term, Drop/Add period is December 17 ONLY. 

Students from other universities and institutions interested in taking a winter 
intersession course should contact the Admissions office at 814-393-2306 
or e-mail at http://www.clarion.edii/adnilss/ and click on 
http://www.cIarMm.edu/reyistrar/pdlsAVInterIntersessi()nforin.pdf 

U) illl out a "Quick Admit" lorm. 

Graduate applicants CANNOT use the quick admit form. Click on 
wwM.cIari«n.edu/graduatestudles/appIy..shtml for more information. 

( Ian. in t nlv^■^^ll> l^ .m aliiriTiatin; aclii>n cqi ai nppiidiiiiiis i-miilii\o( 



Tedjeske 

Franchino 

Smith 

Bering 

Shepard 

Goodman 

Maguire 

Mufphy 

Ellermyer 

L, Brovi/n 

J. Brov^n 

Vega 

Krueger 

Reid 

Huddleston 

Lingwall 

Lavin 

Vilberg 

M. Kuehn 

Turner 

Michel 

Burghardt 



If you have any questions concerning winter intersession, contact 
Lynne Fleisher at 814-393-2778 or ineisher@cIarion.edu. 

NOTE: Fall 2007 grading will not be completed until 12/20/07. Students 
seeking information on grade status before 12/20/07 should contact their 
instructor directly. 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 



(INC I l(«7 



Page 7 



TfflE CLARION CALL 



October 11. 2007 



ClmilMs 



liri'i'k \k Trdii'l Eiiipliitiiii'iil. Fiir Kciil, I'l'i'Minah, anil liwriil Id.^ 



FOR RENT 



m«w 



LAKEN Al'AIMMKNTS" 
fully furnished. Utilities 
Included. Available Fall 
2008/SprinR 2009 for \-:\ 
people. Houses available for 
2-8 people. Exreptionally 
nice and CLEAN. Call Fatty 
at (814) 745-3121 or 229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
ments.com 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CMSS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562-1020 
Next to campus, various 
houses and apartments. 
Accommodating! -4 students 
or groups of 3-4. Some 
include utilities. Rent starts 
at $1200 per semester. Visit 
us online at 

www.aceyrental.com or call 
Brian at 814-227-1238 

EAGLE PARK APART- 
MENTS, FULLY FUR- 
NISHED, INCLUDES 
UTILITIES 3 BLOCKS 
FROM CAMPUS. LEAS- 
ING FOR SPRING, SUM- 
MER, & FALL. SAFE, 
CLEAN, AND BEAUTI- 
FUL. (814)-226-4300 * 



www.eagle-park.net. Brooklyn, 

Located at 301 Grand Ave. Happy Fall! 
Clarion Pa. • BK 






tIAWirffcl* 



Spring Break 2008 . Sell 
Trips, Earn Cash and Go 
Free, Call for group dis- 
counts. Best Prices 
( i u a r a n t e e d ! Jamaica. 
Cancun, Acapulco, 

Bahamas, S. Padre, Florida. 
800-648-4849 or 

www.ststravel.com 



PERSONALS 



Happy 21st Courtney! 

Behave! 

From, J 

Happy 21st birthday Dave! 
Love, Steph 



Welcome back to our coun- 
try Aunt Pat! 

Heinz the Baron Von Cron 

Espy, 

Thanks for everything this 

weekend! 

-Your other girlfriend 



Happy fall to one and to all, 
crisp and cold, winter 
weather is about to unfold. 



HAPPY 21STT0MISS 
SARAH ELIZABETH 
DENT! WE LOVE YOU! 
-The Call Staff 



Go Pens & Steelers! 




ALEXANDER, ALEXANDER AND TROESE, LLP 
Attorneys at Law 



Underage Drinking 
Criminal Law 



DUI 
General Law 



44 South Seventh Avenue 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Telephone: 814-226-4440 

Email: alcxanderlaw^erizon.net 



Place a classified with us! 

Cost is 10 cents per word with a 
$1.00 minimum. 

All classified ads must be submitted no 
later than 3 p.m. Wednesday the week 

of pubHcation. Customers have the 

option of paying in cash or check when 

placing the ad, or the option of being 

billed at the end of the 

semester. 

To place a classified call 814-393-2380 
or fax us at 814-393-2557 

Classified may also be placed via email. 
Please email us at call@clarion.edu 

We also have classified ad forms which 

can be picked up at our office in 270 
Gemmell on the bulletin board. Simply 
fill out your ad and place it in the clas- 
sified drop-off folder 



The Clarion Call reserves the right to refuse ads which are questionable in con- 
tent, or if the purchaser has a large outstanding debt. 




Ken Ith 

MoNrroR Engineer 

"Flying" 




Gym Class 
Heroes 
& Crew 

Spotlight 



By 

Ldndsay Grystar 

'If you could have 

any super power 

what would it be?" 




Tyler Pursel 

Keyboardist 

■Tm super the way I am to 

be completely honest. I ask 

for nothing more." 




Matt Binkley 
"Merchanary" 

"The power of flight." 



Matt 

McGlNLEY 

Drummer, 

"The power to kill a 

yack from 200 yards 

away with mind 

bullets." 




Px ORECAST 

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October 11. 2007 



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Mi: follejliiill improvrs to ly Smr Iosbs to flal 2-0 



Golden Eagle Volleyball gets another win, defeats Slippery Rock 3-0 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 9 - After 
playing at Edinboro last 
week, the Golden Eagles 
returned to the cozy con- 
fines of Tippin Gymnasium 
for another big PSAC-West 
matchup against Slippery 
Rock Tuesday night. Unlike 
their last game against the 
Fighting Scots, the Golden 
Eagles picked up a win 
against the Rock, three 
games to zero. 

On Spirit Night in 
Tippin Gymnasium, Clarion 
won all three games by 
scores of 32-30, 30-20, and 
30-26. The match featured 
plenty of back and forth 
scoring, as well as a lot of 
unforced errors from both 
teams. With both offenses 
failing to find a rhythm, the 
game was quickly turned 
over to the hands of the 
defenses. 

Sarah Fries led all 
Golden Eagle hitters with 
14 kills while also having 17 



digs and five blocks. Her 
senior counterpart 

Christina Steiner finished 
with 11 kills and 10 digs. 
Amanda Angermeier also 
had another solid game, tal- 
lying 10 kills. Setting up 
her hitters once again was 
Kristi Fiorillo. In addition 
to her 15 digs and two aces, 
the senior setter picked up 
43 assists. 

Anchoring a solid 
Golden Eagle defense, fresh- 
men middle hitter Nicole 
Andrusz picked up several 
key blocks in addition to her 
seven kills. Not to be out- 
done by her taller counter- 
parts, libero Vicky Gentile 
picked up 32 digs. 

Despite the errors in the 
match, the Golden Eagles 
were pleased with the win. 
"Coming back off the loss (to 
Edinboro), it feels good to 
get the momentum back," 
said outside hitter 
Angermeier. "From this 
point on, we're hoping to 
win out the rest of our 
games," she also said. 

"It feels like we're get- 
ting back on track, our con- 



fidence is up from where it 
was," said Fioriollo, "Our 
passing was really good, the 
defense was much better, 
and we played more as a 
team tonight than we did 
against Edinboro." 

With the victory, Clarion 
is now 18-3 overall with a 4- 
2 record in the PSAC-West. 
The win also gave the 
Golden Eagles a bit of 
revenge against Slippery 
Rock, who swept them in 
last year's series. 

Clarion's fourth section 
win eclipses the total of 
three set by last year's 
squad. The Golden Eagles 
still have a long way to go 
though, with four more con- 
ference matches as well as a 
few other non-section 
games. 

For their next match, 
the Golden Eagles will stay 
at home against Lock Haven 
next Tuesday night. 
Defeating the Bald Eagles 
for the first time since 2002 
earlier this season. Clarion 
knows the rematch will not 
be a walk in the park. 
However, they feel they are 




The Golden Eagles Volleyball team Improved their record to 18-3 on Tuesday Oct. 9 when they 
defeated Slippery Rock 3-0. Clarion is next in action when they host Lock Haven on Oct. 16. (The 
Clarion Ca///Archive Photo) 



up to the task. for Lock Haven," said 

"Lock Haven's a good Angermeier. "For us to win, 

team," said Fiorillo. "We we're going to have to play 

have to stay positive and as good defensively as we 

take good swings against did against them last time, 

them," she also said. We also have to keep up 

"We always psyche up with our serving and hit- 



ting," she also added. 

Game time for the 
Golden Eagles match 
against Lock Haven is 7 
p.m. 



Golden Eagles football falls to Shippensburg 41-23 on homecoming 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscritchf@clarion.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 6 - On 
homecoming day in Clarion 
in front of a crowd of 5,800, 
there were high hopes for a 
Golden Eagle win, especial- 
ly since they were facing 
an9ther winless club iw * 
Shippensburg; that meant- 
only one team '^gjujd t jjltajj', J 
winless. 

On Saturday afternoon, 
that team was the Golden 
Eagles as they lost 41-23 to 
the Red Raiders, and once 
again did not perform up to 
par. 

The Clarion defense 
allowed 444 yards of total 
offense, including 296 rush- 
ing and 148 passing. The 
Red Raiders also had 22 
first downs compared to 
Clarion's 17. 

The Golden Eagles got 
off to a good start, scoring on 




Number 38, freshman kicker, Robert Mamula lines up for a kick during the Golden Eagles loss to 
Shippensburg. Mamula was 2-2 on extra point attempts and made a 28 yard field goal in the 
fourth quarter. (The Clarion Ca///Stefanie Jula) 



a Pierre Odom fumble recov- 
ery in the end zone for a 
Clarion touchdown to give 
them a 7-0 lead. 

In sharp contrast how- 



ever, the second quarter was 
an entirely different story. 
Shippensburg fullback 
Aaron Dykes, who rushed 
for 114 yards on 15 attempts 



and three touchdowns in the 
game, scored the first of 
three second quarter touch- 
downs for the Red Raiders 
on a one-yard run with just 



over ten minutes remaining 
to tie the score. 

With less than three 
minutes remaining in the 
second quarter, Dykes 
rushed three yards for his 
second touchdown, putting 
the Red Raiders in front 14- 
7. Shippensburg was not 
finished in the second quar- 
ter as they scored with 42 
seconds remaining when 
quarterback Gabe Maiocco 
hit Mike Harris for a 20- 
yard touchdown strike and a 
21-7 halftime lead. 

Clarion barely had time 
to blink before Shippe- 
nsburg scored again opening 
up the second half. The Red 
Raiders drove 70 yards on 
only four plays in just over 
one minute, and the end 
result was a David Richards 
12 -yard run to make the 
score 28-7. Jamie Reder 
tacked on a field goal mid- 
way through the third quar- 
ter to put Shippensburg 
ahead 31-7. 



The Golden Eagles, 
however, came out in the 
fourth with some momen- 
tum and scored on a 78-yard 
touchdown pass from Gino 
Rometo to Fred Robinson to 
pull the Golden Eagles with- 
in 18, at 31-13. The Red 
Raiders had an answer to 
that score, when Dykes 
scored his third touchdown 
of the game with a one-yard 
run with 10:30 remaining tu 
stretch the lead to 38-13. 

Clarion and Shippe- 
nsburg exchanged field 
goals to make the score 41- 
16, and then Rometo snuck 
into the end zone on a one- 
yard run to cap the scoring 
for the night, putting the 
Golden Eagles behind 41-23. 

Clarion will once again 
try to right the ship and go 
for their first win of the year 
this week when they travel 
to Slippery Rock to take on 
the Rock this Saturday at 2 
pm. 



This week around Major League Baseball 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.edu 

It's the middle of 
October, and that can mean 
only one thing. Actually, it 
can mean a whole heck of a 
lot of things. However, for 
this article, it can only mean 
that the baseball playoffs 
are here and in full swing. 
That being said, our own 
Pittsburgh Pirates managed 
to make some headlines of 
their own, amidst all the 
playoff excitement. 

In a move expected by 
many, the Buccos fired man- 
ager Jim Tracy. In addition 
to Tracy, the Pirates did a 
sweep of the entire organi- 
zation, firing many others 
including player develop- 
ment director Brian 
Graham and scouting direc- 
tor Ed Creech. 

Graham, who filled in as 
general manager for Dave 
Littlefield, was the biggest 
surprise of cuts. However, 
the general feeling from the 
Pirates organization seems 
to be that a complete over- 
haul is in order. Good to see 
it only took them fifteen los- 
ing seasons to notice that. 

Cleveland third base 
coach Joel Skinner has been 



listed as a possibility to 
replace Tracy. Other names 
being floated around are 
Pirates minor league man- 
ager Trent Jewett and 
Indians minor league man- 
ager Tony Lovullo. 

Some other more unlike- 
ly names are former man- 
agers Art Howe and Buck 
Showalter. Whoever does 
end up getting the job better 
have a lot of patience and 
aspirin, as the team he 
inherits is sure to give him 
plenty of headaches next 
season. 

Shifting gears, the 
Major League baseball play- 
offs have offered plenty of 
surprises and shockers. 
After finishing fourth and 
fifth respectively in the 
National League West last 
season, the Arizona 
Diamondbacks and 

Colorado Rockies find them- 
selves playing each other in 
the National League 
Championship Series this 
season. 

In what has become a 
parity trend in baseball, 
both of these teams' out- 
played franchises with vast- 
ly greater payrolls than 
either of them had. If that 
doesn't offer hope to Pirates 
fans, I'm not sure what can. 

The American League 



match-up isn't quite as 
improbable, with the 
favored Boston Red Sox tak- 
ing on a young, talented 
Cleveland Indian team. 
While many fans may have 
preferred another Yankees- 
Red Sox series, this match- 
up should provide interest- 
ing. 

Both teams have power- 
packed lineups with excel- 
lent pitching. Look for this 
one to come down to the 
bullpens. Eric Gagne hasn't 
had the impact the Red Sox 
were looking for when they 
traded him, and Joe 
Borowski makes every ninth 
inning an adventure for the 
Indians. For Indians fans 
who remember Jose Mesa in 
1997, pray and hope that a 
similar fate doesn't await 
the tribe this post-season. 

One side effect of the 
Indians American League 
Championship Series defeat 
against the Yankees is that 
it may have cost Yankees 
manager Joe Torre his job. 
Taking over in 1996, Torre, 
along with some kids named 
Jeter and Rivera, found 
immediate success, defeat- 
ing the Atlanta Braves in 
the World Series. 

The win would be a sign 
of things to come as the 
Yankees would go on to win 



three more World Series 
from 1998-2000. Overall, 
Torre's Yankee teams would 
accumulate 1,173 regular 
season wins, 10 first-place 
finishes in the American 
League East, twelve 
straight trips to the play- 
offs, and six World Series 
appearances. 

However, after three 
consecutive first-round exits 
in the playoffs, it looks as if 
Joe Torre's time in the 
Bronx is up. Early word is 
that the Yankees may go 
with a familiar face in Joe 
Girardi to replace Torre. 
Another name is that of St. 
Louis manager Tony 
LaRussa who may decline to 
return to the Cardinals. 
Yankees owner George 
Steinbrenner has a pen- 
chant for bringing in big 
names, and LaRussa's may 
be the biggest out there this 
off-season. 

If this truly is the end 
for Joe Torre as a Yankee, 
then it has been quite a ride. 
Here's to hoping that he 
manages to find the rest and 
relaxation one can only get 
when they don't have to 
work for George 

Steinbrenner any more. 



Steelers shut out Seattle 
in Super Bowl XL rematch 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

9_e1<bowser®ciarion.eciu 



The Steelers squared off 
with the Seattle Seahawks 
on Sunday in a rematch of 
Super Bowl XL. The 
rematch ended in much the 
same way, with a Steelers 
victory. This time when the 
Seahawks were handed 
defeat they couldn't cry 
about bad penalties. 

After the Steelers beat 
Seattle in Super Bowl XL in 
Detroit on Feb. 5, 2006 the 
Seahawks complained for 
months that the officiating 
was poor and cost them vic- 
tory. Seattle really had no 
reason to complain anyway 
as the penalties should have 
been called if yoti know any- 
thing about the definition of 
what constitutes offensive 
pass interference or holding. 

Anyway this time 
Seattle had no reason to 
even consider complaining. 
The Steelers were the more 
penalized team in the game 
and instead of doing nothing 
about it and crying after- 
wards they put it behind 
them and took it to the 
Seahawks. 



The game had little to 
no action until mid second 
quarter when the Steelers 
put together a 4:49 second 
drive that culminated with 
a IS-yard touchdown pass to 
Heath Miller. Seattle got the 
ball with under two minutes 
remaining and drove down 
the field only to have Matt 
Hasselbeck's last second 
pass intercepted by Ike 
Taylor at the one yard line. 

The Steelers got the ball 
to start the second half and 
not only put the game away 
but got some revenge for all 
the complaining the 
Seahawks did a year and a 
half ago. They put together 
a 17-piay 80-yard touch- 
down drive that lasted 
10:i7. 

What was of most 
importance on that drive 
was that the Steelers were 
called for holding on three 
separate occasions. But 
rather than whine about it 
the Steelers kept their 
heads in the game and con- 
tinued to fight until they 
broke into the endzone on 
Najeh Davenport's one-yard 
touchdown run. 

See "STEELERS" on 
page 9. 



October 11. 2007 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Soccer loses to California 2-0, remains tied for fourth in PSAC-West 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjckovalovs@clarion.eciu 

CLARION, Oct. 7 - The 
Golden Eagles started the 
week with high hopes to 
come away with a pair of 
victories after only scoring 
once in the previous three 
games. However, Lady 
Luck was not on their side, 
as they were shut out by 
both West Virginia 
Wesleyan and California. 
Clarion's record fell to 2-4-1 
in conference play and 4-7-2 
overall. 

Going into the game 
against PSAC-West division 
opponent California, 

Clarion had hoped to turn 
their bad luck around after 
having been shut out by 
Lock Haven earher in the 
week. However, after two 
early goals by Amanda 
Heister and Erin Riggle, 
Clarion was put away 

California had a total of 
ten shots. Heister put a 
total of four shots on goal, 
while Riggle added three 
more. Clarion posted 17 
shots of its own. 

Beth Ellen Dibeler led 
the way with three shots. 
Five other players had two 
shots each. 

After being shut out for 




The Golden Eagles lost their third consecutive game on October 7 when they were defeated by West Virginia Wesleyan 3-0. Clarion 
has been shut out in all three losses. (The Clarion Ca///Darla Kurnal) 



the second consecutive time 
in their 2-0 loss to 
California, Clarion was 
looking to get a victory 



against non-conference 
opponent W.V. Wesleyan. 
However, the end result was 
no better than the previous 



two games. The Golden 
Eagles were shut out 3-0. 

Katie Schubert first con- 
nected in the 23rd minute 



after taking a pass from 
Calli Thomas. Schubert 
added her second of the 
game at the beginning of the 



second half in the 47th 
minute. Meghan Zayas fin- 
ished out the scoring with 
her goal in the 61st minute. 
Clarion had only six shots. 
Emily Downs and Katie 
Patterson each had two. 
Chelsea Wolff and Gina 
Shero added the other two 
for the Golden Eagles. For 
Wesleyan, Zayas had five 
shots, Schubert had four, 
and Meghan Taylor had one. 
Clarion remains tied for 
fourth place in the PSAC- 
West. 

With six games remain- 
ing, and three in the divi- 
sion, it looks as if that is all 
that they will progress. 
They need to win two of the 
remaining three and hope 
for Edinboro to go winless in 
conference play to take sec- 
ond place. 

The Golden Eagles fin- 
ished their six game homes- 
tand with a record of 1-2-2. 
They entered with a record 
of 3-4. Their next three 
games will be away, and 
they will finish the season 
with three straight home 
games. 

The Golden Eagles will 
travel to Millersville to take 
on the Marauders (1-10-2) 
Saturday morning. 



Continued from 
"STEELERS" on page 8. 

That drive set the tone 
for the rest of the game. Not 
only did it put the Steelers 
ahead by 14 points but it 
seemed to take away any 
confidence that Seattle may 
have had. 

The game also serves as 
notice to those Steelers 
bashers who clatm thfe'team 
still h^dr^'t played anyone. 
Seattle is considered one of 
the best teams in the NFC, 
and the Steelers handled 
them with ease even though 
they were missing three 
Pro-Bowl players in Hines 
Ward, Casey Hampton and 
Troy Polamalu. 

Santonio Holmes also 
missed the game as he 
'tweaked a hamstring in pre- 
game warm-ups which left 
the Steelers with just three 
active receivers for the 
game. 

The Steelers improved 
to 4-1 with the victory a 



game clear in the AFC 
North of Baltimore (3-2). In 
beating a quality team like 
the Seahawks the Steelers 
put their name in the mix 
with the elite teams in the 
league. There are only three 
teams in the NFL with a 
better record than the 
Steelers: New England, 
Indianapolis and Dallas are 
all 5-0. But either New 
England or Dallas won't be 
undefeated much longer as 
the two get set for their 
showdown this Sunday in 
BigD. 

The Steelers will enjoy 
their bye week this weekend 
which couldn't come at a 
better time for the team as 
they can now rest their 
injured players in hopes of 
getting them back for their 
Oct. 21 trip to Denver. That 
game starts a three game 
stretch that sees some 
familiar foes when the 
Steelers visit Cincinnati and 
host Baltimore. 




adagio 






*Umh Control* 

•ImtngtrKy COntractptian* 

*f*mgmfvc^ Testing* 

* Annual Cvwcc^tcal exams* 




.^ 






1064 A. tmt Main St. 
Clarion, PA 16214 

814-226-7500 



wiirw.-»itafratH*{tti,W9 







.Attorn^, 

Hon^, lnte^;i^xperlence - 

Raising th6 Stfadardfimlun Crinm^ 



Paid 1)1 







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i^«l. 




Flag Football Results 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, lUcrtitbn, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



lock Down 
3305 

Team Bartb 
3 In 3 Out 
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Mean Machine 40-25 

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Chicka Yeah 45-t 

Fly Bait 55-18 

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Team Banks 40-22 

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Busch 2B-I6 

3 in 3 out 50-20 
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Chicka Chkb 50-22 

Cauasian Inv 33-24 
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Purple Kush 45-29 

X-Factor 37-24 

BNKennelz 46-12 

Pent House 20-11 



Rag Footbail Undefeated T«am$ 

3.ClickCbck 5-0 

6. Your Mom 6-0 

9. Garden Gnomes 5-0 

22. KSAC 6-0-1 

24. Untouchables 4-0 

28. Lockdown 54 

W2. Little Giants 2-0 



Tennis Tournament Results 

10/9/07 



Sara Hines 
Morgan Welsh 
Andrew Smith 
Devin Burda 
Robb Lawrence 

mm 

Gabrial Proletti 
VitoAddaiH 
Ben Leech 
Corey Stemtfal 



Kara ^zoncsyk 
Lydia Braham 
(^lei fVoieto 
Nick Cagg^no 
Corey Stem^ 

John Burnett 
Mathew GoWyn 
Devin Burda 
Zach Steinmetz 



Dodgeball Resute 



Cincinnati Bonties Grit Nasty 

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Hapa Hadles Wilk 5 
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9.WeWantS>«eti 7-0 

I. Cincinnati Bonties 64) 

12. Hapa Hadles 54) 

S.GrltyNasty 5-1 

10. Ranch 44 4-3 

2.4 South 3-2-I 

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4.Wilk5 1-3-2 

7. St NUC-LANA l-l-J 

Wonnm- 

WK ZTA J4) 

W2. Dodge & Dive 04>-l 

W3. Dtp & Duck 



24) 
2-1 
2-0 



10/11/07 




Beach Volleyball Champs 




Mens- Go Banana! 
Nate Si)rcrikl ^ Uike SclmeOer 

Outdoor Soccer Results 

Reffner's Mom Ky FHed f 

Pork Chops Team Crash 4-0 

Pork Chops II St8mo*sFire 3-0 

♦ftay-offs start Monday 10/15 

Up Coming 111 events; 

Indoor Soccer 

3 on 3 Basketball 

Tug of War 

inner Tube Wat^ Ba^etball 

Table Tennis 

Badminton 

G< I .i|| info ,11 ilr RE(' ( Vmer m Oi-Iiiie! 



Paintball • Sunday, 10/21 

All ecjuipment will be ftirnlshed kKludlng 
maricer, mask. C02, and 500 rounds of paint 
Cost for students Is ody $15. Please s^ up 
at the RIC fi'ont desk by the end of the day 
Thursday. lO/IB so we get an accurate tomt 
and can give you n>ore details. 

VoUeybatl Results 

mm 

CU Girls ZTA 21-3.21-19 

CU's Finest WHI Work Sets F 

Balitrs Tteeaam 19.21. 2l-iOJ5.i3 

O) Staff I Your Face 16.21,21-15.15-10 

No Names AthChaUMi 2M9. 21-15 

Yes or No UglyStidt 21-18, 2M6 



Martin No Name 21.19.16.21,15.12 

CU Girls Balbrs 21-16, 21-15 

CU Staff Wolverine l6.2ai'IIJ5-IO 

CLUB SPORT CORNER 

ln4Jii« Hockey Club - v^on their second 

game of the season bf upsetdr^ a rfval 

Slippery Rock on tO/4. 

Women's Rugby Ckk • donninated 

ObeHin last Satur^ 414). La^es travel to 

Slippery Rode tNs weekend. 

Men*f Rugby Ck^ . defeated CMU on 

homeconning day by a score of 26-3. The 

guys will host a pby-off natch this Saturday. 



•NM 



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^» 



Page 10 



im CLARION CALL 



October 11. 2007 



S^w Annual National City 

Autumn Leaf Pbstwal 

Septembek 19 ' OcTOBtK 7, 2007 

% OlAWN, PENNSYLyANIA 



Photos by Shasta Kurtz, Jenifer Poblete, Angela Kelly 
Adam Huff. Sean Montgomery. Stefanie Jula, Andy 
Lander, Darla Kurnal and Jessica Lasher 



It 




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WCUB remodels 
remote truck 



m pg. 



4 




Bor^our: Meet the 
French club 



see PM. 







CUP volleyball 
defeats Lock 
Haven 



One copy free 



THECL 



Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 




NCALL 



^ 



Volume 94 Issue 6 



OctobtM IS. :oo' 



CUP awarded $1.3 million by PASSHE 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler®cla rion .edu 

CLARION, Oct. 16 - The 14 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education 
(PASSHE) universities 
received $38.7 million in 
performance funding for 
2007-08, with Clarion 
University receiving just 
$1,328,847. 

The awards are distrib- 
uted based on improvement 
in the following key areas: 
student retention, gradua- 
tion rates, degrees awarded, 
instructional cost per stu- 
dent and the percentage of 
full time tenured and 
tenure-track instructional 
faculty with terminal 
degrees, and others. 

CUP was awarded more 
than $2 million in perform- 
ance funding for 2006-07 
and was awarded less in 
every area, with the excep- 
tion of Faculty Productivity 
, in which CUP received 
$237,814 this year and 
$230,000 last year. (A full 
outline of awards for the 
2007-08 year can be seen in 
the adjacent chart.) 

The state universities 
qualify for a share of the 
funding based on each uni- 
versities personal improve- 
ment on the performance 
measures, as well as how 
well they fared compared to 
their own set of peer institu- 
tions outside of PASSHE on 
those same measures, and, 
on their performance in 
comparision to the goals of 
the statewide system. 

"This year, our persist- 
ence rates fell somewhat," 
said President Joseph 
Grunenwald. 'This was like- 
ly caused by large class sizes 



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in a number of areas espe- 
cially in general education 
and less than ideal sched- 
ules." 

Grunenwald indicated 
that large class sizes and 
less then ideal schedules 
were a result of difficult 
budgets. 

'This year we have pro- 
vided additional funding for 
more course section and for 
next year we will be adding 
permanent faculty positions 
to help us reduce some of 
the problems students have 



faced in the past," said 
Grunenwald. 

Grunenwald also indi- 
cated areas that showed sig- 
nificant improvement. 

"These include such 
things as the implementa- 
tion of the Transitions 
Program, introduction of the 
on-campus housing require- 
ment for freshmen, signifi- 
cant increases in promotion- 
al efforts especially for 
minority students and care- 
ful monitoring of the costs of 
providing lower and upper 



division courses as well as 
graduate courses," said 
Grunenwald. 

He also recognized the 
significant growth in 
degrees awarded at the 
graduate level and "strong 
performances in areas like 
dotoral degree qualification 
for permanent faculty, facul- 
ty productivity, and holding 
down costs for both under- 
graduate and graduate edu- 
cation." 



MRS A case 
confirmed 



Lindsay Grystar 

Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

s..llgrystar@c)arion.eclu 



CLARION, Oct. 17 - 
Clarion has confirmed 
that a case of Methicillin- 
resistant Staphylococcus 
aureus (MRSA), a staff 
infection that has been in 
recent news, has been 
found at Clarion 
University. 

It was first reported on 
WCUB-TV's Wednesday 
night newscast that a stu- 
dent from the CUP cam- 
pus was confirmed to have 
MRSA. 

Skin tests were con- 
ducted in Tippin Gym 
Wednesday for all athletes 
to ensure infection would 
not spread further. 

According to a cam- 
pus-wide e-mail sent out 
by Ron Wilshire of 
University Relations, 
"Some staph bacteria are 
resistant _to antibiotics. 
MRSA is a type of staph 
that is Hpstant to antibi- 
otics called beta-lactams. 
Beta-lactam antibiotics 
include methicillin and 
other more common 
antibiotics such as 
oxacillin, penicillin and 
amoxiciUin. While 25 per- 
cent to 30 percent of the 
population is colonized 
with staph, approximately 
one percent is colonized 
with MRSA." 

Jamie Bero, cheerlead- 
ing coach and dance advis- 



er said, 'The cheerleaders 
and the dance team were 
examined and had a skin 
test done on Wednesday 
afternoon." 

Darlene Hartle, health 
educator with Keeling 
Health Center confirmed 
that all team practices 
were cancelled Wednesday 
and that everything was 
taken out of the locker 
rooms and weight rooms 
for cleaning. 

"I think everything is 
being done that can be 
done. I know they are 
cleaning from head to toe," 
said Hartle. 

Suzanne Schwerer, 
sophomore mass media 
arts and journalism major 
and member of the cross 
county team said, 'They 
looked at our arms and 
legs and if there were any 
open sores, they were 
swabbed and sent in for a 
culture." 

Hartle said, "MRSA 
happens in hospitals all 
the time. Our physician 
talked to trainers and 
coaches last spring about 
the growing concern." 

Staff and students are 
instructed to continue 
practicing good hygiene, 
including washing your 
hands. 

Hartle said, "[MRSA] 
has become a growing con- 
cern in young people. If 
you have a sore that isn't 
heaUng you should come to 
the health center to get a 
culture." 



Bill to ban cell piiones yet to be passed 



State system scliools reach agreement 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmricharcl@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 14 - The 
General Assembly of the 
Commonwealth of 

Pennsylvania is currently 
working on a new bill that 
will prohibit the use of cell 
phones while driving, how- 
ever, it has yet to be passed. 
This bill, known as 



House Bill no. 1827 Session 
of 2007, has caused a great 
deal of controversy and con- 
fusion. An email was sent to 
many residents of Pa., 
warning them of this new 
law, an email that is actual- 
ly fictitious. 

On Oct. 4, The Potty 
Press, a weekly newsletter 
published by the Clarion 
University Keeling Health 
Center, published that the 
bill had already been passed 



by the General Assembly 
and will take effect on Nov. 
10. 

The information per- 
taining to the bill in the 
publication was incorrect, as 
the bill has yet to be passed. 

Keeling Health Center 
has accredited their mis- 
print to a typo and break in 
communication. 

See "CELL PHONE" 
continued on page 2. 




House Bill no. 1827 Session of 2007 has yet to be passed, which would ban the use of cell 
phones while driving a motorized vehicle. (The Clarion Call/ Andy Lander) 



Donald Baum 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_clwbaum@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 15 - 
Faculty members and coach- 
es at Pennsylvania's 14 
state owned universities 
have reached an agreement 
in their contract disputes 
with the State System of 
Higher Education. 

The contract negotia- 
tions have been part of an 
ongoing process since June 
30, when the old contracts 
expired. 

According to Pat 
Heilman, President of the 
Association of Pennsylvania 
State College and 
University Faculties, "Two 
new contracts were ratified 
by the union membership on 
Tuesday, Oct. 9 and also by 
the PASSHE Board of 
Governors on Thursday Oct. 
11." 

Heilman said, 'The two 
new contracts are retroac- 
tive to July 1, 2007 and will 
expire June 30, 2011." 

The consequences of a 
possible strike by state uni- 
versity faculty members in 
July 2007 became para- 
mount on the minds of stu- 
dents attending state owned 
universities throughout the 



Commonwealth. 

The possibility of a 
walkout by Clarion 
University faculty threat- 
ened to put education as 
well as graduation plans of 
the 6,759 students enrolled 
for the fall semester on hold. 

News of the ratification 
of the new contract between 
faculty members, coaches, 
and the PASSHE, should 
help to put the minds of 
Clarion University students 
at ease. 

The new faculty con- 
tract received a 2,699 to 
1,172 vote from the 5,500 
faculty members. 

The contract for univer- 
sity coaches was ratified by 
a count of 200 votes for and 
seven votes against. 

The average nine-month 
salary for full time facu'ty 
members employed by 
Pennsylvania's 14 state 
owned colleges previously 
stood at $70,000 while max- 
imum salaries reached as 
high as $60,000 for instruc- 
tors and $98,000 for full pro- 
fessors. 

In the fall of 2008, 
according to the new con- 
tract, full time university 
faculty can expect to receive 
a $1,750 cash payment. 

In addition, full time 
university faculty will 



receive a three percent 
across the board general pay 
increase, with another three 
percent pay increase in 2009 
and an additional four per- 
cent increase in 2010. 

University coaches can 
expect to get $1,250 cash 
bonus for the first year fol- 
lowed by a three percent 
across the board general pay 
increase with another three 
percent increase in 2009 
and an additional four per- 
cent increase in 2010. Part- 
time coaches will receive a 
$625 bonus. 

Despite the bonuses and 
across the board pay raises 
both university coaches and 
faculty members can expect 
to pay more in the cost of 
their health benefits. 

"Health care co-pays 
will remain at ten percent of 
premium cost for 2007, 2008 
and 2009 and rise to 15 per- 
cent in 2010," said Heilman. 
"There will be additional 
penalties for non-participa- 
tion in the wellness program 
effective January 2009." 

According to the new 
contract, part-time faculty 
members can expect a limit- 
ed workload of six hours per 
semester and 25 percent of 
full-time employees and reg- 
ular part-time faculty mem- 
bers. 



^HV^IOTV^W 



Page 2 



Tm CLARION CALL 



October 18. 2007 






kws 



Wolf named female Division II scholar athlete 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ieerickson@clarion.edu 




Jamie Wolf 



CLARION, Oct. 12 - 
Clarion University gradu- 
ate, Jamie Wolf was named 
the top female Division II 
Scholar- Athlete of the Year 
last month. 

Wolf was named as the 
top female scholar-athlete 
by the Division II 
Conference 
Commissioner's Association. 

Each year the Division 
II Scholar Awards are spon- 
sored by Disney's Wide 
World of Sports and each 
year there are 16 regional 
winners selected by the 



Division II Conference 
Commissioners Association. 
There are eight female win- 
ners and eight male winners 
selected. Wolf was selected 
as the winner out of the 
eight females that were cho- 
sen as finalists. 

The Division II Scholar- 
Athlete Award has been 
awarded for the past eight 
years. Wolf is the first ath- 
lete from the Pennsylvania 
State Athletic Conference 
(PSAC) to receive the 
award. Along with being the 
first to win this award, she 
is also the first PSAC ath- 
lete to win a national 
award. 

"We are all very proud of 
the quality student-athletes 
that Division II institutions 
produce annually," said Jim 
Naumovich, commissioner 
of the Great Lakes Valley 
Conference and president of 
the Division II 

Commissioner's Association, 
according to the Clarion 
University newswire. 

"Disney's Wide World of 
Sports has helped Division 
11 in many ways and we are 
grateful to Disney Sports 



Attractions for helping us 
recognize this outstanding 
talent." 

Last year Wolf graduat- 
ed from Clarion University 
with a 4.0 GPA and a degree 
in molecular biology. 

Wolf received an NCAA 
Post-Graduate Scholarship 
and she is attending Ohio 
State University to major in 
molecular genetics and get 
her doctorate degree. 

She was named the 
University's top biology stu- 
dent and asissted Clarion 
University in earning four 
first place finishes and a 
second place at the 38th 
Annual Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania University 
Biologists meeting. 

Every year the 
Commonwealth of 

Pennsylvania University 
Biologists honors the top 
biology student from the 14 
PASSHE colleges in 
Pennsylvania. 

At the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania University 
Biologist meeting she pre- 
sented her senior honors 
research project. Her proj- 
ect was called "Rapidly 



Phagocytosed Gram 

Negative Bacteria Display 
Bound Annexin-1 Secreted 
by Human Neutrophil-Like 
Cells." 

Besides being a scholar 
Wolf was also an exception- 
al athlete at Clarion 
University. She was a mem- 
ber of the diving team for all 
four years while at Clarion. 
Additionally, Wolf was 
named the NCAA II Female 
Diver of the Year three 
times. She was named the 
diver of the year in 2004, 
2005 and 2007. 

Along with these 
awards Wolf has also won a 
record seven NCAA national 
championships. She won 
her seven national champi- 
onships in just eight 
attempts. In her last season 
at Clarion Wolf won the 1 
and 3 meter national cham- 
pionships. In the 1 meter 
she set the NCAA record 
with 453.75 points. At the 
end of her final season Wolf 
was also named the ESPN 
The Magazine/CoSIDA 2007 
At-Large Academic All- 
America of the Year. 







BP»r,TRK 



^ 



The ClarioD Call provides a synopsis of all crim- 
inal investigations as conducted by Clarion 
University Public Safety for the month of 
October 2007. All information can be accessed on 
the Public Safety Web page, 

http://www.clarion.edu/admin/publicsafety/loca- 
tion.shtml. 

■ Oct. 12, at 3:20 a.m., Robert Hanna, 19, of Reno, Pa., 
was cited for underage consumption, public drunken- 
ness, and disorderly conduct after University Police 
were called to the second floor of Wilkinson Hall on 
reports of Hanna being intoxicated and becoming sick. 

■ Oct. 10, at 8 p.m., Margaret Simic, 18, of Pittsburgh, 
Pa., was cited for underage consumption and public 
drunkenness after University Police found Simic to be 
staggering in front of Tippin Gym during a concert. 

■ Oct. 10, at 8:50 p.m., Meredith Bernstein, 18, of 
Chester Spring, Pa., was cited for underage consump- 
tion while attending a concert at Tippin Gym. 



Student senate announces RSO statuses and search for new senator 

Lacey Lichvar 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_lelichvar@clarion.edu 

Sbiati 




CLARION, Oct. 15- Student 
Senate met Monday night to 



announce the RSO status 
changes and that they will 
be accepting nominations 
for a new senator. 

The committee on 
Rules, Regulations, and 
Policies announced a list of 
RSOs whose status has 
changed from inactive to 
active. These organizations 
were inactive because the 
senate was waiting for the 
required information from 
each of these groups. Now 
that they have properly sub- 
mitted their paper work the 
student senate recognized 
them as active RSO's. 



Included are: Lift Every 
Voice Gospel Choir, Eagle 
Ambassadors, Intervarsity 
Christian Fellowship, 

KUDETS, National 

Residence Hall Honorary, 
Omega Psi Phi and Relay 
for Life. 

Secretary Rosano 

moved to recognize the CU 
Track and Cross Country 
Club as an RSO. 

The senators expressed 
approval and felt that 
their paper work had been 
completed properly. 

Treasurer Puhalla sec- 
onded the motion. It was 



passed 17-0-0. 

President Dustin 

McElhattan said that there 
has been a resignation from 
the student senate and they 
are accepting nominations 
for a new senator. 

'To be eligible for the 
position you must carry a 
QPA of 2.5 and not be on 
academic or disciplinary 
probation. You also must 
have two semesters remain- 
ing at Clarion," said 
McElhattan. 

Nominations will be 
announced at the next sen- 
ate meeting on Oct. 22. 



The Committee on Sub- 
Committees is looking for 
two student senators for the 
advisory board. This posi- 
tion would include involve- 
ment in the Review 
Committee and deciding 
which projects are funded. 

In other news, the Social 
Events Subcommittee 

reported that they were 
asked if they would like to 
combine the student senates 
Casino Night with a 
Mocktail party hosted by 
the Greek organization 
GAMMA. 

Senator McGuire said. 



"They would want to co-host 
the event which would be 
the senate doing it's planned 
Casino night while the 
gamma's ran their 
Mocktail party." 

The student senators 
discussed this in terms of 
how it would boost partici- 
pation. 

McGuire pointed out 
that by joining the two 
events there would be » 
large turn out from the 
Greek community. 

They will go over this 
with the committee before 
coming to a decision. 



"CELL PHONE" 
continued from front 
page. 

As of Sept. 11, 2007 the bill 
has been referred to the 
Committee on 

Transportation and has yet 
to even be voted on. 

A public hearing on Bill 
1827 is to be conducted on 
Oct. 15 in Harrisburg, 
which will be the first action 
taken on the matter. 

Before any bill can 
become a law, it must be 
approved by the full Senate 
and House of 

Representatives. 

In an interview with 
WGAL-TV in Lancaster, 
House Transportation 

Committee Chairman 

Joseph Markosek stated 
that the previously men- 
tioned email is, "from an 
unidentified source, which 
confuses the introduction of 
a bill (HB 1827) on Sept. 11, 
2007 with the actual pas- 
sage of that bill into law." 

"The bill in question has 
not received any votes as of 
today and currently remains 
in the House Transportation 
Committee," Markosek said. 

The House Bill 1827 
was scheduled to be dis- 
cussed as a part of a dis- 
tracted driving public hear- 
ing by the House 
Transportation Committee 
on Oct. 15. 

Matthew Vahey, Chief of 
Staff for State 

Representative Josh 

Shapiro verified that "the 
bill has not been passed" as 
of yet. 

Bill 1827 is an amend- 
ment to the Motor Vehicle 
Code which specifically 
states that, "...no driver 



shall operate any moving 
vehicle on a highway of this 
Commonwealth, which shall 
include Federal, State, and 
municipal highways, while 
using a handheld mobile 
telephone." 

For the purposes of Bill 
1827, a handheld mobile 
telephone is defined as, "a 
mobile telephone other than 
a hands-free telephone with 
which a user engages in a 
call using at least one 
hand." 

Phrasing and wording 
found in the bill allow for 
certain loopholes. 

First and foremost. Bill 
1827 only applies to roads 
that are highways. 

Hands-free telephones 
are allowed, being defined 
free as, "A mobile telephone 
that has an internal feature 
or function, or that is 
equipped with an attach- 
ment or addition, whether 
or not permanently part of 
such mobile telephone, by 
which a user engages in a 
call without the use of either 
hand, whether or not the 
use of either hand is neces- 
sary to activate, deactivate 
or initiate a function of such 
telephone." 

Thusly, speakerphones, 
headsets, or any other 
devices not requiring the 
use of hands to operate are 
permitted. 

However, the bill specifi- 
cally provides an exception 
for, "...law enforcement offi- 
cers and operators of emer- 
gency vehicles when on duty 
and acting in their official 
capacities." 

The full bill can be 
found on the General 
Assembly's Web site, 
(httpV/www.legis. state. pa. u 
si). 




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Page 3 



Tm CLAHION CALL 



October 18. 2007 



Ifiiili 



Everything will fall into place 




!§lf®MJ^| 




Grace Regalado 
Advertising manager 

s_gmregalaclQOclarion.edu 

So we're heading into 
the eighth week of school 
now, and if you're anything 
Hke me, you're a senior with 
no "real" designated plans 
for the present moment or 
what's going to happen after 
graduation. And that's fine. 
Personally, I've never really 
been one to "plan." I'm as 
indecisive as the weather 
here in Clarion County, and 
I procrastinate Hke it should 
be my minor. 

I always feel like I need 
to clear my head before I sit 
down and really think 
deeply about something or 
the next step I'm going to 
take, which goes along quite 
well with my procrastina- 
tion. 

Growing up has played 
a pretty extensive role for 
me in this "no planning." My 
father is a retired surgeon, 
so expectations in my house- 
hold were higher than any- 
thing. Dad always and still 
does act like the house is his 



operating room and every- 
thing needs to be done 
"STAT." He and my sister 
are prime candidates for "A" 
type personalities. Watching 
my dad and sister be incred- 
ibly hard working and driv- 
en was always inspiring, but 
I always took that "rebel- 
lious" way of slowing down 
and really seeing what's out 
there. 

I grew up the youngest 
in my family and including 
my siblings it was practical- 
ly like growing up with five 
parents. But it gave me a lot 
of character and made me 
realize what I did not want 
to be like. 

I think everyone just 
needs to slow down. I've 
seen too many people stress 
out about the craziest things 
in our young days. 
Especially when whatever 
they're stressing about, 
they're stressing about it 
because it makes them feel 
"less perfect" or because 
they received a "B" grade on 
a paper and consider that 
failing. If everyone in the 
world could take a step back 
and realize perfection is just 



fiction, and failures come 
with reality, that would 
make me smile. And if 
you're having a bad day, I'm 
sure the person sitting next 
to you is having one ten 
times worse. Believe me, I 
had a mini break down yes- 
terday, and I've not totally 
been myself since Friday. 
Things like that will hap- 
pen. But it's not the end. 1 
always think that things are 
where they should be when 
they should be. 

And things also don't 
necessarily need to be done 
STAT, but they also don't 
need to wait until the last 
minute. Hey at least 1 can 
admit that! We're in college 
and we're young. My mom 
used to always tell me if we 
become too impatient and 
too angry with things, we 
grow older quickly. 

Breathe... it's a good 
thing. Take time to enjoy life 
and be grateful for what you 
have. Things could be worse. 
Don't expect anything more 
than you can't handle. 
There's definitely no room 
for growth when we all 
make mountains out of 
molehills. As long as you 
have love and laughter, 
nothing else really matters. 

So the next time you are 
sitting at a traffic light and 
it stays red for what may 
seem like eons but realisti- 
cally was only three min- 
utes, or you didn't signifi- 
cantly fail something but 



you didn't do as well as 
you'd like or you're just 
experiencing any type of 
scenario where someone 
next to you actually might 
be having a crisis, think of 
what you do have and what 
you can't lose. Maybe just 
for a day, take the time to 
not think of your next move 
or the next thing you're 
going to do because it's the 
"right" thing to do. Take the 
time to sit and think, think 
about a TV show or a funny 
conversation. Or just take 
the time to sit and sit. 

Here's a quote that pret- 
ty much sums up what I've 
been trying to say in this 
entire article, from A 
Million Little Pieces by 
James Frey. 

"Overesteem men and 
become powerless. 

Overvalue possessions and 
begin to steal. Empty your 
mind, and fill your core. 
Weaken your ambition and 
toughen your resolve. Lose 
everything you know and 
everything you desire and 
ignore those who say they 
know. Practice not wanting, 
desiring, judging, doing, 
fighting, knowing; practice 
just being...everything will 
fall into place." 



The author is a senior mass 
media arts and journalism 
major and advertising man- 
ager o/The Call. 



Moderate Shmoderate: The GOP Candidates 




Zach Hause 
Columnist 

s_zhause@clarion.edu 



With ALF festivities 
dominating most of every- 
one's time, including mine, 
for most of last week it's fair 
to say that I didn't get a 
whole lot of news watching 
or headline reading done, 
but there was one story that 
made me laugh a little bit. 
Through my blurred vision 
and inebriated state I man- 
aged to detect a story that 
seemed to die rather quickly 
in the media, but not in my 
heart. Arizona Senator and 
Republican presidential 
hopeful John McCain, made 
a slip of the tongue that may 
or may not go over so well 
with some hardcore reli- 
gious fanatics, depending on 
which religious fanatic 
hears it. 

McCain, while on the 
"No Surrender" tour of the 
country, recently took the 
next inevitable step in rais- 
ing the white flag of his 
campaign by stating the fol- 
lowing (pertaining to his 
idea of what a real American 
president should not be) : "I 
admire the Islam. There's a 
lot of good principles in it; 
but I just have to say in all 
candor that since this 
nation was founded pri- 
marly on Christian princi- 
ples, personally, I prefer 
someone who I know who 
has a solid grounding in my 
faith." He later called the 
reporter and clarified what 
he had said earlier stating 
that "I would vote for a 



MusHm if he or she was the 
candidate best able to lead 
the country and to defend 
our political values." I just 
hope his foot tasted as good 
going in as it will when he 
takes it out. 

But I guess that he may 
have at least won some 
points with the Religious 
Right in the beginning, but 
that probably dissipated 
after the clarification. The 
rest of the country kind of 
chuckled and realized that 
the once popular prospect of 
President John McCain may 
have just been flushed down 
the toilet. McCain has a 
widely accepted reputation 
as being a more moderate 
Republican. He has crossed 
the aisle several times to 
vote with Democrats on 
issues like campaign finance 
reform, torturing bans 
and... well, there might be 
more, but, he does not want 
anyone to know about them. 
McCain is distancing him- 
self from his moderate label 
and trying to pitch his con- 
servative ideals to key play- 
ers in the Religious Right. 
What better way is there to 
do that than to say some- 
thing completely bigoted? 

However, McCain is not 
the only one having troubles 
appealing to the religious 
base of the Republican 
party. The GOP really has 
its hands full with its presi- 
dential candidates this time 
around. George W. Bush is 
not really helping matters 
for them either. "W has no 
real credibility among any- 
one besides business owners 
who exploit illegal immi- 
grant workers, or rusty 
pickup truck drivers who 
still have their "Sportsman 
for Bush" stickers displayed 
proudly on their pipe 
bumper. His endorsement, if 
it ever does come, will just 
be a detriment to whoever 
receives it. So, George, if 
you are reading this, please 
endorse Rudy Giuliani. 



Rudy Giuliani, former 
mayor of New York City and 
current top contender for 
the GOP nomination, is fac- 
ing criticism from all across 
the religious spectrum. 
Giuliani has a more liberal 
stance on abortion and gay 
rights, as well as has been 
married three times, which 
does not sit well with Focus 
on the Family leader James 
Dobson, or many others who 
make up the Religious 
Right. The claim has been 
by Dobson made that if 
someone who is pro-choice 
receives the GOP nomina- 
tion, then they will seriously 
consider endorsing a third 
party candidate. I wonder 
who they could be talking 
about? 

Giuliani, a Catholic, 
does not even really embody 
what most Catholics see as 
an endorsable figure, prima- 
rily because of his pro-choice 
stance. It's okay Rudy, they 
did not go for John Kerry 
either, and he was a 
Catholic too. At least Rudy 
is honest with them and 
tells them that he is not 
going to change any of his 
stances, but hopes they will 
vote for him because he will 
continue to nominate con- 
servative judges like George 
W. Bush has. That is just a 
tad strange that someone 
claims to be pro-choice, but 
would elect judges to poten- 
tially overturn Roe v. Wade. 
This is quite a paradoxical 
campaign, wouldn't you say? 

Mitt Romney, former 
governor of Massachusetts 
and current GOP contender 
for the White House, is also 
facing criticism from the 
religious community. But 
Romney is an easier target 
for most critics because he 
is a Mormon. As sad as it is, 
no one is really looking at 
his past stances on abortion 
or gay rights because he 
reformed them for this elec- 
tion. Sadly, they just say the 
same thing, that he is a 



Mormon. Something about 
those Massachusetts people 
that makes them change 
their mind a lot. 

Romney, although a top 
fundraiser, is having prob- 
lems appealing to many 
Republicans, well once 
again, because he is a 
Mormon. Did I mention he 
was a Mormon yet? 
Personally I do not care 
which God he prays to, or if 
he marries thirteen women, 
or if he juggles bowling pins 
for a living. But I do care 
about his leadership quali- 
ties and his change of heart 
from the time he was a sen- 
atorial candidate of (that 
liberal hell hole) 

Massachusetts, to now, 
where he is seeking the holi- 
est of political offices, the 
White House. Romney, a one 
time senatorial candidate 
against conservative punch- 
ing bag Ted Kennedy, wrote 
the following in a letter to 
his hopeful constituents "As 
a result of our discussions 
and other interactions with 
gay and lesbian voters 
across the state, I am more 
convinced than ever before 
that as we seek to establish 
full equality for America's 
gays and lesbian citizens, I 
will provide more effective 
leadership than my oppo- 
nent." 

I guess that was then 
and this is now. Things are 
way different now, just ask 
all the top experts on the 
subject. You can usually tell 
the experts on the subject of 
homosexuals, just go out to 
any bar or hunting club and 
look for the guy with the 
"God made Adam and Eve, 
not Adam and Steve" shirt 
on. Everyone knows that it 
used to be okay for two peo- 
ple of the same sex to be in 
love, but now it isn't. As Ron 
Burgundy just might put it. 
It s science. 

And just hke any other 
member of the media. I 
won't give any real coverage 



lidiliiiiiil li'llm III Ihi' lliir and I'i on lou 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Phone: 814-393-2380 Fax: 814-393-2557 

Web: clarion.edu/thecall E-mail: call@clarlon.edu 



Executive Board 
2007-2008 



Lindsay Grystar, 

Editor-in-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 



Stephanie Desmond, Shasta Kurtz, 

Features Editor Photos & Graphics Editoi 



Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hill-Wagner 
AcMser 



Staff 
Newy Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Jamie Richard, Donald 
Baum Entertainment Amy Powers, Amber Stockholm, 
Joey Pettine, John Buffone Sporte Travis Kovalousky, 
Kelsey Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield, Denise Simons 
Features: Rob Miller, Gregg Bandzuh, Nina Watts 
P h o t ograp h y an d Gra phics; Jenifer Pobiete, Dominic 
DeAngelo, Adam Huff, Sean Montgomery, Stefanie Jula, 
Andy Lander, Daria Kurnai, Jessica Lasher Ctrculation: Nate 
Laney, Eric Miller, Justin Hogue, Brian PIcard, Craig Beary, 
Jessica Cornman 



Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and 
obscenity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the 
Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. IVIondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-currlcular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 



■ Opinions expressed in this pubiication are 
those of the writer or speaiier, and do not 
necessarily reflect the opinions of the news- 
paper staff, student body, Clarion University 
or the community. 



to the other Republican can- 
didates, especially crazy 
Ron Paul. That guy actually 
believes in the constitution. 
What could he possibly 
know? He likes to rave 
about the constitution, but I 
don't pay attention, I just 
praise Hillary Clinton and 
burn the American flag once 
he starts rambling on about 
that stuff. 

And you're asking your- 
self, well what about P>ed 
Thompson? Fred Thompson 
is an old fat Reagan "wanna 
be." If you want to see Fred 
Thompson, go watch Cape 
Fear. It's a good movie and 
Fred doesn't look nearly as 
ugly as what he does now. 



Tree 6kpwim of 

^QrrQT 
fivturt 

Fif.fn. in 
Cimtnetl MfJ^ 

An^ie-nce. 
fMiicimtu^n, 

PrMj C'ffnUst, ^n^ 
Virain ^ficrifius 



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Page 4 



Feitim 



im OABION C| l |^ . 



October 18. 2007 



WCUB-TV's remote truck gets a make-over 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbandzuh@clarlon.edu 

WCUB-TV's remote tel- 
evision efforts are now in 
the midst of expansion. 

WCUB-TV's remote 
truck was bought in the 
summer of 2006 and was 
then remodeled this past 
summer by Dr. Robert 
Nulph, associate professor 
of mass media arts, journal- 
ism and communication 
studies (MMAJCS). Nulph 
did not accomplish this task 
alone, however. He was 
assisted by Bruce Exley, 
chief engineer for WCUC- 
FM and WCUB-TV. 

Now that the truck has 
been remodeled, it is being 
put to use on a regular 
basis. The truck is at every 
home football game, volley- 
ball match, basketball game 
and wrestling match. 
Outside of sports, it is used 
at the Autumn Leaf 
Festival, the Miss Autumn 
Leaf Festival Pageant, 
Greek Sing and Clarion 
Borough Council Meetings. 

"We believe we have one 
of the most adaptable video 
production remote units 
among colleges in 



Pennsylvania," said Nulph. 
"It is a huge addition to our 
curriculum because we are 
capable of going anywhere 
and using multiple cameras 
to present an event." 

Originally a used ambu- 
lance, the truck was pur- 
chased through the use of 
Computer Services and 
MMAJCS funds. The 
Clarion University 

Foundation Incorporated 
funded some of equipment 
that was needed. 

Exley discovered the 
ambulance while it was 
being used as a portable 
intensive care unit. The 
ambulance features a longer 
wheel base that provides 
more space, making it a per- 
fect fit for WCUB-TV's 
needs. 

Dan Rinkus, a senior 
MMAJCS major and station 
manager at WCUB-TV, said, 
"With the addition of the 
truck, more people will 
hopefully respond to broad- 
casting. The truck makes 
everything very convenient. 
Compared to the old trailer, 
the truck's [simplicity] and 
flexibility are much better." 

Some of the improve- 
ments include a computer 
system for editing video, 
graphic capabilities, 12 



ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 




Dear Dr. Eagle, 

My girlfriend obsesses over her appearance! I think 
she's naturally beautiful, but evidently she doesn't 
believe that's possible. I enjoy her company because 
she's smart and fun to be with, but waiting for her to do 
her hair and makeup and look "perfect" before we can 
get a burger or work out at the Rec Center is getting to 
be a drag. We have to plan all outings well in advance 
because it takes her hours to prepare to go anywhere. I 
don't get it. 

Signed, 

Tired of Waiting 
Dear Tired of Waiting, 

Sounds like your girlfriend has taken tl# bait film 
the various cosmetic, diet and fashion industries that 
make us believe our appearance is unacceptable. Men 
and women are bombarded with ads and commercials 
that strive to convince us that we are in need of major 
improvements. 

From a very young age we are inundated with the 
message that we need to be thinner, tanner, have larger 
breasts/pecs, six pack abs and use a ridiculous number 
of expensive products to hide our numerable flaws (a zit, 
frizzy hair, wrinkles or brittle nails). Billions of dollars 
are spent each year by people hoping to buy a "miracle 
in a bottle" that will make them look like the air- 
brushed models touted on television, magazines and 
billboards. Your girlfriend may be trying so hard to 
replicate an unrealistic image dictated by the media 
that she's unaware that it's completely unnecessary 
and, in fact, is an interference to your relationship. 

October 18 is Love Your Body Day! What a great 
idea and reminder that perfection is a myth. One's time, 
money and efforts could be much better spent on activi- 
ties that promote health and acceptance of our own 
unique package. Should we try to look good? Of course, 
but not so much that we are missing out on life because 
of excessive primping. 

So tell your girlfriend today that she has 20 minutes 
to shower and brush her teeth then take her out to cel- 
ebrate the fact that she's great just as she is! 

Dr. Eagle is written by Valerie Wonderling of the Keeling 

Health Center. For more information or to suggest a topic, 

e-mail her at s_vjwonderh@clarion.edu. 



channel audio capabilities, 
wireless microphones for 
field reports, almost 400 feet 
of cable for each of the cam- 
eras and two compact disc 
decks. 

The remote truck also 
allows the control of up to 24 
cameras and advanced 
recording capacity with two 
hard drives utilized as 
instant replay decks. 

For football games, a 
crew of five people con- 
tributes to the broadcast-an 
instant replay operator, an 
audio director, a graphics 
operator, a technical direc- 
tor and an overall director to 
handle the truck. There are 
also two field camera opera- 
tors, two camera operators 
in the stands, two sideline 
reporters and two commen- 
tators. 

"Using the truck is a co- 
curricular for our program 
and a requirement for one of 
our courses," said Nulph. 
"Each student gets to work a 
certain number of games. 
They have done incredibly 
well, picking up the technol- 
ogy very fast. We hope to do 
a remote broadcast from one 
of this year's road football 
games." 

This past summer, 
Nulph and Exley put their 




Dan Rinkus, WCUB-TV station manager works inside oftlie remote truck. I his truck is used to broad- 
cast a variety of sports and Clarion County events. It has been newly remodeled and houses an 
array of new equipment. (The Clarion Call/Daria Kurnel) 



heads together and started 
from scratch with the truck. 
"We needed to use a lot 
of ingenuity and lay it out 
logically," said Exley. "None 
of what we used was prefab- 
ricated. We used old coun- 
tertops and bookshelves for 



the interior. We created 
everything ourselves and 
designed on the go. We are 
lucky to have the extra-long 
wheelbase. The additional 
two feet and the hollow 
walls allowed us to keep 
most of the wires hidden." 



"[Exley] and I see eye- 
to-eye on most things, so it 
was easy to come up with a 
design for the interior," said 
Nulph. "It was fun, like put- 
ting together a huge puz- 
zle." 



Political Economy Club 
wants to help beyond CUP 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

From Darfur forums to 
humanitarian trips to New 
Orleans, the Political 
Economy Club (PEC) keeps 
its members actively 
involved on campus and 
beyond. 

The group's goal is to 
provide students with a 
view of economics that they 
don't receive in the class- 
room. They make members 
more aware of social, socie- 
tal and economic issues 
through sponsoring speak- 
ers, attending conferences 
and participating in commu- 
nity service. 

"It's open to anyone 
interested in the political or 
economical world around 
them," said Lucas Schaeffer, 
a senior international busi- 
ness major and community 
service chair of the PEC. 



'They learn things they 
wouldn't [learn] in classes." 

Schaeffer also said he 
joined the group because he 
wants to help educate other 
students about things he's 
passionate about. 

An economics tutoring 
service is in the works 
through the club and they 
encourage members to con- 
duct undergraduate 
research in preparation for 
graduate school. 

Through attending con- 
ferences, the members learn 
about different fields of eco- 
nomics and bring the knowl- 
edge back to the rest of the 
group and campus. 

A major project for the 
group last year was a 
Darfur forum. A speaker 
from Sudan was featured 
along with other professors 
who spoke about genocide. 
According to Rozlynd Vares, 
a senior business and eco- 
nomics major and president 
of the PEC, over 250 people 



attended and surveys indi- 
cated that the attendees' 
knowledge on genocide and 
Darfur was significantly 
increased. 

The focus of this semes- 
ter for the PEC is their trip 
to New Orleans. In conjunc- 
tion with the St. Bernard 
Parish, they will be rebuild- 
ing homes for those affected 
by Hurricane Katrina. 

Vares said helping 
Katrina victims has always 
been a personal interest of 
hers. When she presented it 
to the group, everyone was 
interested in a trip and 
wanted to extend it to the 
rest of campus. 

"It's important to be 
members of [a] global socie- 
ty," she said. "We all are 
part of it whether we realize 
it or not." 

Besides the physical 
rebuilding of the homes, 
Vares hopes they can bring 
something else to the fami- 
lies in New Orleans. 



Organization 
Spotlight 



"Not a lot has been done 
in the broad scope of things. 
I hope we can show that 
there are people who still 
care and know about their 
suffering," she said. 

"People don't realize 
what happened with 
Hurricane Katrina," said 
Schaeffer. "We hope to get 
houses built and give people 
back their lives." 

See "PEC" 
continued on page 5. 



ADVISING D^ORMANT 

Have questions about making the most of your educa- 
tion at Clarion? We'll find the answers! 

What are values flags? 

■ First year values- promotes 
reflections on personal values, 

interpersonal values and socie- 
tal issues. 




I Quantitative Reasoning- 
helps one learn about data, 
quantitative expression, evi- 
dence and asserions and quanti- 
taive intuition. 

Second year values- encourages stu- 
dents to explore human values, applied values or ethics 
in a particular context. 

■ Writing Intensive- engage students in higher order 
reasoning and communication in specific disciplines. 
(from the 2007-08 ACES booklet) 

Advising Informant is a service of Clarion University's 
Advising Office. If you have any questions you would like 
answered, e-mail the office staff at advisingi@clarion.edu. 




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October 18. 2007 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



Pages 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nawatts®clarion.edu 



This year's Student 
Trustee, Aimee Zellers, is 
more than just a member of 
the Council of Trustees. She 
is actively involved through- 
out Clarion's campus and 
has worked in our nation's 
capital. 

Zellers is from York 
Pennsylvania. While 

attending Red Lion High 
School, she was active in 
soccer. When Clarion 
University contacted her 
about an opportunity to play 
on the campus, she took a 
tour of the campus and 
decided to attend. 

• "I love Clarion. It pro- 
vides me with many oppor- 
tunities and I love the beau- 
tiful small town atmos- 
phere," she said. 

She is currently a senior 
with a dual major in history 
and philosophy. She chose 
these majors because she 
enjoys reading and analyti- 
cal thinking. 



To become Clarion 
University's Council of 
Ti'ustees' Student Trustee, 
she had to fill-out an appli- 
cation, then face a panel of 
Clarion faculty, staff and 
students. After passing the 
panel's approval, Zellers 
had to be interviewed in 
Harrisburg and appointed 
by the Governor of 
Pennsylvania, Ed Rendell. 

She originally applied 
because she felt it would 
improve her interpersonal 
administrative skills. 

Her duties include stu- 
dent affairs, strategic plan- 
ning, approving and aca- 
demic policy Being involved 
is not only a personal expe- 
rience, she said. She is able 
to increase communication 
between the Trustees and 
Clarion students as well. 

Because of her position, 
she is an ex-officio member 
of the executive board on the 
student senate. She is also 
the President and was the 
Recreation Chair of the 
University Activities Board, 
on the Parking Committee, 
varsity women's soccer 
team, Delta Zeta, History 



Club and Phi Alpha Theta. 

"A lot of people look at 
what I do and ask 'why?' I 
[tell theml that I love 
Clarion and want to give 
back as much as I can," 
Zellers said. 

Along with her activi- 
ties, she is in the honors 
program, has been on the 
Dean's List every semester 
and received the APSCUF 
and Tippin Athletic 
Scholarship award in 2004. 
Zellers also works in the his- 
tory department as a stu- 
dent aid. 

She said she doesn't 
have a hard time balancing 
her time with classes and 
campus involvement mainly 
because she has fun and 
looks forward to what she 
does. 

During the summer she 
interned at the U.S 
Department of Justice in 
Washington D.C. in the 
office of International 
Affairs Criminal Division. 

"I served in the capacity 
as a paralegal but my title 
was 'legal intern,'" she said. 

She assisted extradition 
and mutual legal assistance 



French Club and Conversation 
Group: foreign cuiture on campus 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 

There are many co-cur- 
ricular activities and groups 
that students can be a part 
of on campus. For those who 
are interested in other cul- 
tures and languages, a per- 
fect one for them is the 
University's French Club 
and French Conversation 
Group. 

Although they seem 
similar, these are actually 
two separate groups. Dr. 
Elisabeth Donato, a native 
of northern France and a 
French teacher in the 
Modern Languages 

Department for nine years, 
is the advisor of both 
groups. She helped explain 
the difference between the 
two. 

"The French club is rec- 
ognized by the campus, and 
only Clarion students are 
members," explained 

Donato. "The conversation 
group is more community 
based, and they meet off 
campus at Michelle's Cafe." 

The two groups meet on 
alternating Wednesdays 
from 6:30-7:30 p.m. 

The French Club, the 
more formal of the two, has 
been around for a number of 
years, but has suffered a 
decline in more recent 
years. 

"We have had trouble 
recruiting students," 

explains Donato, "but this 
year I vowed to turn every- 



thing around." 

Members of the French 
club hope to recruit more 
members this semester in 
several ways. 

Rachel Beveridge, a jun- 
ior elementary education 
major, has been President of 
the French Club since the 
beginning of the semester. 

"Dr. Donato spreads the 



Organization 
Spotlight 




Dr. Elisabeth Donato, French Club and French Conversation 
Group advisor. (The Clarion Call/Jess Lasher) 



word to her classes about 
the French Club," said 
Beveridge, "and everyone 
who is in a French class 
receives an e-mail about 
events going on." 

At French Club meet- 
ings, they watch French 
films or discuss events the 
group is planning. One of 
the future events that the 
group has planned is a trip 
to Montreal in early April, 




which will be open to all stu- 
dents on campus. 

The group will be hold- 
ing two fundraisers to help 
fund the trip, one in the fall 
and another in the spring. 

This isn't the only event 
the group plans to do in the 
future. 

"We are planning to 
teach kids French at the 
public library by the end of 
the month," says Beveridge. 

For those who are less 
fluent in French, there is 
the less formal, more com- 
munity-based French 
Conversation Group. 

Adam Harbaugh, a sen- 
ior with majors in French 
and Spanish, is a member of 
both groups. He has been a 
member of the Conversation 
Group the entire length of 
his Clarion tenure. 

As the club title insinu- 
ates, they speak in French 
for an hour to each other 
and just kind of hangout. 

"We just get together 
and talk," says Harbaugh. 
'There's really no structure 
and it's not really formal. 
There were 15 or 16 people 
that I saw at the last meet- 
ing." 

The group is open to the 
entire community, not just 
to Clarion students. Donato 
said that she has seen all 
kinds of different people at 
meetings, from students to 
faculty members to mem- 
bers of the community. 



<attipii9 Cbse-up 

SA^^HHft ■^''^^^^P^'' _*»*"'^^^^^ ^^^ ^^(W Y ^^H? 




cases and dealt with prima- 
rily English speaking coun- 
tries like the United 
Kingdom, Canada and the 
English speaking Caribbean 
nations. 

"This summer was great 
experience. I met a lot of 
important people like the 



director of the FBI, 
Authority General and 
Director of the Department 
of Justice Criminal Division. 
It was a great educational 
experience." 

She considers her 
involvement a hobby, but in 
her spare time she plays the 



guitar and is a fan of hockey 
and the Pittsburgh 
Penguins. 

After graduating, she 
plans to go to graduate 
school for a PhD and become 
a college professor. 




Look in next week's issue for the answer! 




Last week: Statue outside of the 
Immaculate Conception Church 



Ciarion residents protest tlie war 




Members of the Clarion community and university held a march and rally Oct. 11 to protest the 
war and support the troops in Iraq. (The Clarion Call/Angela Kelly) 



"PEC" continued 
from page 4. 

The members of the group 
plan to somehow bring their 
experiences back to campus 
to give students a better 
understanding of the lives 
Katrina victims are still liv- 
ing. 



"It will educate and 
actually do something to 
rebuild economic develop- 
ment," Schaeffer said. 

They will be going to 
Louisiana during 

Thanksgiving and will also 
serve food with the United 
Way They are still accepting 
volunteers until the end of 
October. 



Other members of the 
executive board include 
Jennifer Cambell, vice pres- 
ident: Lindsay Banner, 
treasurer: and Heather 
Bender, fundraising chair. 
Their advisor i.s Dr. Sandra 
Trejos and they meet 
Thursdays at 5 p.m. in IIU 
Still Hali. 



Pages 



im CLARION CALL 



October 18, 2007 



fci 



Siterkmtt 



Wolf scheduled to give lecture for craft exhibit 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers@clarion.edu 

A variety of art styles 
and techniques are avail- 
able for viewing in the 
Manchester Art Guild 
exhibit, located on Level A of 
the Carlson Library. 

The exhibit, which runs 
from Oct. 15 to Nov. 16, fea- 
tures artwork created by 
artists from the Manchester 
Craftsmen's Guild. In addi- 
tion to the art exhibit, there 
will be a reception on Nov 1 
from 5 - 7 p.m., followed by a 
lecture from contributing 
artist Amanda Wolf at 7 
p.m. 

Wolf, who has a passion 
for working with clay, is a 
2003 graduate of Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania. 
She grew up in Chester 
County, where she took her 



first art class involving 
class. She has beenin love 
with it ever since. 
Currently living and work- 
ing in Pittsburgh, she 
worked at the Carnegie 
Museum of Art. It was there 
that she first began teach- 
ing ceramic classes to 
adults. 

Wolf and her artwork 
are not new to the Clarion 
area since she has been 
traveling to the Clarion 
wood kiln for the past four 
years, along with students 
and fellow potters. This 
year, Wolf will be giving a 
lecture as well as firing pot- 
tery. 

"During my lecture, I'm 
planning on sharing my 
work, also what inspires me 
and what the guild is 
about," said Wolf. 

The guild that she is 
referring to is the 
Manchester Craftsmen's 




Liz Fisher checks out the Manchester Art Guild exhibit /n Level A 
of the Carlsor) Library. (The Clarion Call/Adam Huff) 



Guild, which is located in 
Pittsburgh. The guild 



IS 



directed towards minorities 
and hopes to foster a sense 



of accomplishment and hope 
through visual and perform- 
ing arts in urban communi- 
ties. 

Upon entering the guild, 
each artist is identified and 
selected for programs by a 
team of staff, artists, stu- 
dent advisers and program 
leaders at the guild. 

Wolf is currently an 
instructor, teaching mostly 
14- 18 yearolds in an an 
after-school program at the 
guild for the Pittsburgh 
Public School District. 

"1 am also a 
liaison/teaching artist at a 
partnered public school, 
planning and teaching art 
integration to mostly fifth 
through eighth graders," 
said Wolf. 

The art exhibit features 
some of Wolf's ceramic work 
as well as works by other 
Manchester Craftmen's 
Guild artists^ Josh Green, 



Fiona Wilj^on, Heather 
Powell, -Jenny Canning, 
Casey Droege, Justin 
Mezzei. Natalie Tranelli, 
Dror Yaron, Germaine 
Watkins, Carmen Council, 
Dave Deily and Jamie 
Matthews. 

The artwork of these 
artists spans from more tra- 
ditional pieces to modern 
and abstract pieces. 
Different mediums are also 
incorporated in the exhibit. 
From water colors to still 
photographs, to sculptures 
and ceramics, the exhibit 
has something for every 
type of art lover. 

The exhibit is free and 
open to the public Monday 
through Thursday from 10 
a.m. to 3 p.m. Another 
exhibit activity will be a 
ceramics wood firing at the 
kiln at Memorial Stadium 
on Nov. 2-4. 



I used to be disgusted, and I'm still tangled up in blue 



Dr. Elisabeth Donate 
Department of Modern 
Languages & Cultures 

I got really excited a few 
weeks ago when a friend 
purchased a pair of tickets, 
and invited me to the Bob 
Dylan show on Oct. 11 at the 
University of Pittsburgh 
Petersen Events Center. 
Elvis Costello - who is at 
the top of my personal rock 
performers Pantheon (never 
mind that most of my stu- 
dents have no idea who he 
il) - was the opening act. 

Frankly, my friend and I 
secretly hoped that Elvis 
and Bob would perform at 
least one song together. 
After all, Bobby had joined 
Paul Simon in "Bridge Over 
Troubled Water" some 10 
years ago when they were 
touring together. 

On the evening of Oct. 
11, we arrived in Oakland at 
about 6^10 p.m., managed to 
find a parking space on the 
street near the Petersen 
Events Center (which 
helped us avoid having to 
pay for what would probably 
have been pricey venue 
parking), and walked to the 
venue. We had to wait out- 
side for about 15 minutes 
before being allowed to walk 
in, but were close to the 
door, so we did not freeze 
our butts off. 

We entered the Petersen 
Events Center and found 
our seats (pretty good ones, 
on the first level, stage left), 
and waited for the show to 
begin. 

We decided to forego 
purchasing T-shirts, which 
were sold at the outrageous 
price of $35 a pop, and 
bypassed the $6 beers as 
well. We each had a hotdog, 
and shared a $3 bottled 
water (and, yes, folks, that 
was our dinner!). Where 
have the days of the $20 
concert T-shirts gone? 

By 7 p.m., the opening 
band, Amos Lee (the name 
is that of its lead singer), 
came on. They were quite 
good, but their type of music 
was not exactly my cup of 
tea. They played for roughly 
35 minutes. 

By about 8 p.m., 
Costello followed - of course, 
he was the act that I was 
most anxious to see. Just as 
Scott Mervis did in his 
review of this concert in the 
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, I 
still wonder "why a Hall of 
Famer like Costello is tool- 
ing around as an opening 



act," especially since "it 
seemed like he had to win 
over Dylan's crowd, which is 
a fairly inexplicable situa- 
tion given not only his 
stature but the clear influ- 
ence derived from the head- 
liner." Costello performed 
only for 45 minutes, and, 
since he was just an opening 
act, there was no encore. 

Costello was performing 
solo (which, according to 
Mervis, he had not done in 
12 years), opening with "Red 
Shoes," one of my favorite 
songs in his repertoire (how 
can you not love the opening 
line of this song, "I used to 
be disgusted, and now I try 
to be amused"), mustering 
amazing power from both 
his acoustic guitar and from 
his own voice, which is get- 
ting better with age. 

He went on with other 
great songs, "Crimes of 
Paris," "Veronica," "Alison," 
"What's So Funny about 
Peace, Love and 

Understanding" and "Radio 
Sweetheart" - during which 
he managed to get a luke- 
warm audience to sing 
along, even segueing into a 
bit of Van Morrison's "Jackie 
Wilson Said." 

He also sang a brand 
new song composed with 
Loretta Lynn (whose title 
escaped me, but it was in 
the voice of a woman who is 
having a conversation with 
her ex-husband's new wife - 
the opening line was "my 
name is Eve, and I think 
that you should leave"), as 
well as "From Sulfur to 
Sugar Cane" (a song penned 
with T-Bone Burnett) and 
"The River in Reverse," from 
his most recent collabora- 
tion with Allen Toussaint (in 
which he snuck the line "I 
don't wanna be a soldier 
mama, I don't wanna die," 
from the John Lennon song 
"I Don't Want to Be a 
Soldier.") 

Finally, he closed with 
the powerful closing track of 
"The Delivery Man," titled 
"The Scarlet Tide," an anti- 
war song (actually, a song 
about a Civil War widow) to 
which, as he had done at his 
July 2005 show at Station 
Square, he added the lyrics 
"admit you lied, and bring 
the boys back home," which 
finally drew some cheers out 
of the crowd. 

Back in his early days, 
Costello cultivated an 
"angry young man" image, 
and just ripped through his 
set list, seldom interacting 
with his audience. However, 



in his old age, he has turned 
into quite a funny dude - he 
jokes and tells stories. He is 
obviously a happy man, and 
it really shows. 

He mentioned having 
dined recently in an L.A. 
restaurant, close to 
Governor Schwarzenegger's 
table, making it a point to 
mention that the 

Governator would never be 
President of the United 
States. He also made a 
funny little joke about his 
10-month old twin boys 
(with wife #3, Diana Krall), 
saying that they were on the 
tour with him, backstage, 
smoking cigars and playing 
cards. 

Most of the folks in the 
audience were actually 
there for Bob Dylan, who 
showed up some 20 minutes 
after the end of Elvis 
Costello's set. In spite of the 
fact that I was in awe, and 
pinching myself to make 
sure that I was not dream- 
ing that I was seeing this 
legend, I have to admit that 
I ended up saying to myself 
"so what?" Maybe it is 
because I am not a Dylan 
fan, and because I barely 
know his repertoire, except 
for a few obvious numbers, 
but, to me, it seems that 
every song just blended into 
the next, and that they all 
basically sounded alike, 
except for a rousing version 
of "All Along the Watch 
Tower," with which Dylan 
closed his show. 

At the ripe age of 66, 
Dylan looks very good, and 
he certainly was pretty dap- 
per in a cool dark suit and a 
white flat top cowboy hat 
that he never took off. 
However, his voice- with 
which I have always had a 
problem with to begin with- 
has turned beyond gravelly 
and, as a reviewer for the 
Connecticut Post put it, "he 
almost blurts out his lyrics 
in grunts." Not that it's a 
huge problem, in fact, I 
found it kind of fun to listen 
to his inflections, which 
were tons more entertaining 
live than on any of his 
albums. 

The problem, though, 
was that it was absolutely 
impossible to understand 
any of his lyrics. Roger 
LeLievre. of the Ann Arbor 
News, wrote, about Dylan's 
Oct. 12 performance at the 
EMU Convocation Center in 
Ypsilanti, Michigan^ "why 
write such profound, poetic 
lyrics, only to mangle them 
in concert? Is it too much to 



ask that more than a word 
here or there be under- 
standable?" - so, if you were 
not a rabid Dylan fan of the 
type who knows everyone of 
his song lyrics by heart, you 
were basically screwed, and 
bound to get a tad bored. 
Another thing about Dylan: 
he established only the most 
minimal rapport with his 
audience, which he never 
addressed, except to intro- 
duce his band during his 
encore. He was not quite as 



uncommunicative as Van 
Morrison was at a concert of 
his that I attended in 
Londonderry (Ireland) back 
in June, 2006, but he came 
close. 

But, all in all, it was 
really cool to get to see 
Dylan, to whose credit I 
have to admit that he and 
his band really rocked, and, 
although sadly way too 
short, the Costello set was a 
masterpiece. 

Oh and, of course, Bobby 



and Elvis were never on 
stage together. Well, maybe 
next time... 

(Although she will 
admit to being a Chrissie 
Hynde or Patti Smith 
wannabe. Dr. Donate is real- 
ly not one of those "old 
fogeys" who listen only to 
60s music. Her favorite 
"current" bands are The 
New Pornographers, The 
National, The Decemberists 
and Belle and Sebastian.) 




Atom, The World's Fastest Painter, whose real name is Adam IVIiller Geld, came tu Clarion on 
Thursday, Oct. 11. Atom painted numerous paintings in just minutes for students in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. After he was finished with each painting, Atom asked the audi- 
ence a tough question, such as "Who is Lisa Simpson's best friend?" Whoever could answer the 
question the fastest would receive the painting. (The Clarion Call/Stefante Jula) 



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October 18, 2007 



Tiffi CLAfUON CALL 



Page 7 



Dethklok's "The Dethalbum'' 
is absolutely dethtastlc 



Joey Petti ne 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmpettlne@clarlon.edu 




"The Dethalbum" 
Dethklok 
Rating: 3/5 



Dethklok, the mix of 
American and Scandinavian 
metal band, or simply the 
world's greatest cultural 
force, has done it again. 

Dethklok, who can be 
seen weekly on their show 
"Metalocalypse" every 

Sunday at 11:45 p.m. on 
Cartoon Network's Adult 
Swim, despite the efforts of 
the illuminati-esque 

Tribunal to thwart them, 
have released their newest 
album "The Dethalbum." 

With the help of 
"Metalocalypse," creator 
Brendon Small (Home 
Movies), extreme metal 
drummer. Gene Hoglan, and 
ace violinist Emilie Autumn, 
the all-too-metal members 
of Dethklok: bass guitarist 
William Murderface, drum- 
mer Pickles, rhythm gui- 
tarist Toki Wartooth, lead 
guitarist Skwisgaar 

Skwigelf and lead vocalist 
Nathan Explosion, have 
released, finally, "The 



Dethalbum." An album that 
can only be described as one 
of the greatest metal albums 
of all time. 

Dethklok combines the 
harsh deadly reality of the 
cruelest of metal music with 
the Spinal Tap/Scooby-Doo 
feel of "Metalocalypse." 
"The Dethalbum" is an 
album that can be loved by 
metal fans, fans of the' show, 
classic rock fans and basi- 
cally any music lover who 
likes anything a little harsh- 
er than show tunes. 

'The Dethalbum" comes 
in two insane forms: the reg- 
ular edition consisting of 16 
dark tracks of glory and the 
deluxe edition sporting an 
additional seven tracks, 
over 20 minutes of extra 
music. In addition, the 
deluxe edition also includes 
the first episode of the long 
awaited second season of 
"Metalocalypse." 

One great song is 
"Murmaider," which is the 
tale of vengeful mermaids 
committing horrid acts of 
homicide because there is no 
good metal music underwa- 
ter. 

Then there is "Go Into 
the Water," which is 
Dethklok's own call to the 
people of Earth to forsake 
the land and return to their 
bestial forms within the 
ocean. 

"Bloodrocuted" is the 
heart-wrenching tale of the 
damned electrician, while 
"Hatredcopter" is dedicated 
to their own helicopter pilot. 

There is also "Fansong" 
which is damning all their 
sheepish fans, and finally 
the ever popular 

"Thunderhorse," which was 
last seen on "Guitar Hero 




II." 

"The Dethalbum" is a 
true metal masterpiece. The 
album even intertwines 
classical violin in their bril- 
liantly rendered 
"Dethharmonic." 

True fans can even 
check out the band's brand 
new theme to the second 
season of "Metalocalypse," 
"Deththeme." Add on the 
brilliant bonus tracks of the 
deluxe addition such 
as"[The] Duncan Hills 
Coffee Jingle," the beau- 
teous love song "Kill You" 
and even the behind the 
scenes tell it all "Dethklok 
Gets In Tune" and you have 
one metal album that will 
make you laugh, cry, 
scream, bleed, kill, destroy 
and die. 

I gave "The Dethalbum" 
a totally metal three out of 
five leaves because when 
you get right down to it this 
album just plain rocks. 

Although it may not be 
for everyone, any rock or 
metal fan who doesn't get 
the album should just jump 
from the highest peak of the 
tallest point of Mordhaus 
into the deep, devilish, fiery 
painful pits of Mordland. Or 
they can just try and burn a 
copy from their friends. 



''We Own the Night" is 
nothing more than typical 



Amber Stockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alstockhol@clarion.edu 







"We Own the Night" 
Director: James Gray 
Rating: 3.5/5 



What happens when 
two brothers are on the 
opposite side of the law? As 
you can guess, it's both 
interesting and brutal. 

"We Own the Night," 
which is a classic tale of 
good vs. evil, hit box offices 
Oct. 12 leaving crowds 
either loving or hating it. 

The 1988 time-based 
story begins with the 
extremely opposite pair of 
brothers Joseph Grasinsky 
(Mark Wahlberg) and Bobby 
Green (Joaquin Pheonix) as 
one caters to the criminal 
world, while the other fights 
it out with the law. 

Green is a club manager 
in New York City who is 
responsible for allowing a 
Russian drug mafia to traf- 
fic drugs through his estab- 
hshment. While Green and 
girlfriend Amada (Eva 
Mendes) try to keep a safe 
distance from the chaos and 
keep his nose clean, they 
hold a secret from his 
Russian boss and the rest of 
their friends: his brother 



and father are the top notch 
of law. 

When his father, Deputy 
Chief Burt Grasinsky 
(Robert Duvall) and brother 
Lieutenant Joseph warn 
him that the NYPD is plan- 
ning to make a massive 
drug bust in his club, and 
that the people he is associ- 
ated with are trouble, Green 
refuses to hsten. 

As the first bust goes 
wrong and none of the drug 
lords are acquitted with 
charges, Joseph is exposed 
as being the officer in 
charge of the entire opera- 
tion and is shot by Russian 
assassins and forced to 
reside in the hospital for the 
next four months. 

This leaves Bobby with 
the choice to continue aiding 
the corrupt, or start fighting 
for the law with his family. 

With his brother seri- 
ously wounded, and his 
father next in line, Bobby 
steps up and joins the police 
force in an undercover mis- 
sion to end the Russians 
advantage over the govern- 
ment. 

When another mission 
goes into hiatus, Bobby is 
forced to become a man on 
the run from the Russians 
and their ruthless hit men. 

The movie wouldn't be 
complete without a big 
Russian mafia/NYPD show- 
down, but I won't spoil the 
flick for those of you who are 
interested in seeing the 
movie. 

Overall I gave the movie 
3.5 leaves. I thought there 
were some parts that could 
have been thought out a lit- 
tle better. Some parts were 
completely random and not 
necessary, while others 
seemed incomplete. 

I'm a big ending person, 




I like to know where the 
characters are headed, and 
with whom. This movie ends 
abruptly with audience 
members wondering what 
just happened. 

While the directing and 
planning could have been a 
bit better, the acting in this 
movie was amazing. 

Pheonix gave an out- 
stand performance. His 
character was everything 
that it should have been: 
fierce, emotional and intelli- 
gent. 

As usual, Wahlberg 
offered a great performance. 
He intrigued the audience 
and forced you to become 
interested in the difference 
between crime and ethics. 

Mendes's performance 
was interesting because it 
was like none that I have 
seen from her. Her 
charachter was more 
promiscuous and outward, 
unlike most of her previous 
roles. 

On the positive side, 
with all the high-speed car 
chases, intense gun face offs 
and of course, Mendes, the 
movie is sure to be a hit with 
the guys. 

Ladies: I wouldn't rec- 
ommend this one for a sleep- 
over with your girlfriends, 
it's a bit rough around the 
edges. 



''Dazed and Confused" 
never fails to please crowds 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s Jdbuffonp®(;lririnn.edu 




"Dazed and -Confused" 
Director: Richard 
Linklater 
Rating: 4/5 

As I was going through 
my DVD collection last 
week, I was looking for a 
movie that suited all moods 
and personalities. 

After that attempt 
failed, I reached for the old 
reliable "Dazed * and 
Confused." 

"Dazed and Confused" 
is a all-around favorite for 
high school and college stu- 
dents. The film takes place 
on the last day of school in 
May of 1976 at Robert E. 
Lee High School in Austin, 
Texas. 

The future seniors are 
preparing for. the annual 
hazing of incoming fresh- 
men by building paddles 
and buying cooking sup- 
plies. 

Meanwhile, Randall 
"Pink" Floyd (Jason 
London), the school's star 
quarterback, is asked to 
sign a school pledge sheet, 
promising not to take drugs, 
drink, have sex, or anything 
else that would hurt the 
team's chances of a state 



championship. 

When the final classes 
end. the fre.shman boys are 
hunted down by the senior 
boys for paddling while the 
fri'shman girl.s are rounded 
up in a parking lot, covered 
in condiments, insulted by 
the seniors, and forced to 
propose to boys. 

Freshman Mitch 

Kramer (Wiley Wiggins), is 
paddled and humiliated by 
the seniors more than usual, 
most of all by the dumb and 
violent Fred O'Bannion 
(Ben Affleck). 

Mitch gets a ride home 
with Pink, who is .sympa- 
thetic and understanding to 
Mitch's situation. Later, 
Pink offers to let Mitch tag 
along for the evening festiv- 
ities. 

After the major planned 
party is busted, Mitch finds 
himself simply driving 
around with Pink, senior 
Pickford (Shawn Andrews) 
and Wooderson (Matthew 
McConaughey), who gradu- 
ated years before but still 
hangs out with the high 
school crowd. 

It seems that the main 
point of this movie is that 
everyone wants to get 
drunk, stoned or laid. 

The movie climaxes 
with a new party at the 
Austin Moontowers that 
attracts seemingly the 
entire school. 

The party consists of the 
usual adolescent mischief 
and rowdy behavior. The 
film winds down with a 
handful of characters con- 
juring at the football field's 
50 yard-line. Everyone gives 
their two cents on the issue 
of whether Pink signing the 
pledge would be "selling 
out" or simpfy getting the 
coaches "off his back," 




After the police show up 
ai the field, the boy's head 
coach is alerted and man- 
ages to get the police to take 
it easy on them. The coach 
accuses Pink of running 
around with the wrong 
crowd and insults his 
friends which results in 
Pink crumpling up the 
pledge sheet and throwing it 
at his coach. The film con- 
cludes with Pink and his 
friends driving to Houston 
to get Aerosmith tickets. 

Granted, the movie has 
no stone cold plot and does- 
n't have a lot of direction, 
but the constant changing of 
events and activities keeps 
your attention throughout 
the film. 

The movie depicts the 
70s as a wild and crazy time 
where parties and renegade 
youth ruled. With a cast full 
of eventual stars in their 
early acting careers, "Dazed 
and Confused" is full of good 
acting that keeps a non- 
existing plot flowing. 

I recommend "Dazed 
and Confused" for anyone 
who is looking for a movie 
that doesn't require a lot of 
thinking but is definitely 
fun to watch. I guarantee 
you'll catch yourself using a 
one-liner from this movie in 
the future. "Dazed and 
Confused" is just flat out 
enjoyable. 




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October 18, 2007 



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ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
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See them at www.grayand- 
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Next to campus, various 
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Let's Go Pens! 



Alero, 

I'm so glad you're better! 

Love, Mommv 



Laura Love, 

I love you a whole big bunch! 

Love, Eric-Poo 




Spring Break 2008 . Sell 
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My precious son, 

Jesus always loves and 

cares for you. 

HAPPY FIVE YEARS 
SWEETIE! I LOVE YOU!! 
Love, Steph 

Can't wait to see you at 
Thanksgiving Aunt Chris! 



Underage Drinking 
Criminal Law 



DUI 
General Law 



44 South Seventh Avenue 

Clarion, PA 16214 

Telephone: 814-226-4440 

Email: alexanderlaw^erizon.net 



By 

Jessica Lasher 




Join our staff! 
THE CLARION CALL 

is looking for students to fill the 
paid staff positions of: 



- Managing Editor 

- Entertainment Editor 

- Photography/Graphics Editor 

The Clarion Call will start accepting 
applications on October 19. 

Applications will be posted outside of 
the Clarion Call office at 270 Gemmell. 

If you have any questions, please 
contact the staff at caII@clarlon.edu. 



Dan Kelosky 
Senior, Computer Information 

Science 
Fergie, "Because she's Fergalicious!" 



"If you could trade 

lives with a celebrity 

for one day, who 

would it her 




Craig Butler 

Sophomore, Elementary 

Education 

Hines Ward, "It's always been a dream of 

mine to play for the Pittsburgh Steelers." 





Dani Allen 
Junior, Elhmentary Education 

Special Education 
Faith Hill, "Because I could be married to 

Tim McGraw!" 



David Reed 

Junior, Cokpohaik 

Communications 

Donald Trump, "So I could be rich!" 



Kelly Surgalski 

Junior, Environmental Biology 

Jane Goodall, "Because it would be fun to be 

in the Rainforest." 





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oween 





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Friday, Oct.26th 





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October 18. 2007 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Soccer shutout for the fifth consecutive game 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clamn Call Staff Writer 

s_tckovalovs®clarion.edu 



MILLERSVILLE. Oct. 17 - 
The Golden Eagle soccer 
team's string of bad luck 
continued Saturday, as they 
were shut out for the fifth 
consecutive game. The loss 
to the Millersville 
Marauders (2-10-3) in the 
non-conference game 

dropped Clarion's record to 
4-9-2 overall. A 2-0 loss late 
last Wednesday to Edinboro 
(5-2-2, 8-4-3) dropped their 
PSAC-West division record 
to 2-5-1. 

Millersville was able to 
strike early in the game, 
quickly putting it out of 
reach. Madison Vogel 
scored off of a feed from 
Jamie Lancaster in the 16th 
minute. Just a minute later, 



Vogel was able to score 
again, this time unassisted, 
to put the Marauders up 2- 
0. 

The Vogel-Lancaster 
connection worked again in 
the 28th minute. This time, 
however, it was Lancaster 
that scored, putting the 
game away. 

Clarion was held with- 
out a shot for the entire first 
half. In the end, they only 
had a total of five shots, 
three of which were on net. 
Five different players each 
contributed a shot. 

Millersville kept Golden 
Eagles goalkeeper Jess Reed 
busy, totaling 15 shots. 
Eight of those shots were on 
net. Lauren Thomas led the 
charge with five shots, three 
on net. Vogel had four 
shots, and also put three on 
net. 

Clarion was held with- 



out a single corner kick, 
while the Marauders had 
eight, four in each half 

The Golden Eagles trav 
el to PSAC-Western division 
opponent and nationally 
ranked #22 Slippery Rock 
(12-3-1, 6-1-1) Thursday 
Oct. 18. 

Then they will take on 
PSAC-Eastern division 
Bloomsburg (7-5-2) at home 
on Saturday Oct. 20. 
Clarion will wrap up its 
PSAC-Western play on Oct. 
24 with a home match 
against the Indiana 
Crimson Hawks (9-5, 4-3). 

Clarion is looking to 
avenge lUP for a blowout, 
11-0, earlier in the season. 
It was the second consecu- 
tive game in which lUP has 
scored at least ten goals 
against the Golden Eagles. 



Schmader sets school record with 66 



Denise Simens 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s (Jm(m«n8®cl«rlon.edu 



CLARION, Oct, 17 -Golden 
Eagle freshman Jared 
Schmader set a Clarion 
school record last week on 
the second day of competi- 
tion during the Holiday Inn 
Colonial Classic at Montour 
Heights Country Club host- 
ed by Robert Morris 
University. 

Schmader carded a six- 
under par, B6, to break the 
school's single round record, 
and added that to Monday's 
first round score of 74 to 
total 140 and four under par 
for a third place finish. 

Schmader started on 
hole No. 5 of the course and 
scored six birdies (6, 9, 12, 
15, 18 and 4), two eagles (1 
and 14), and had two double 



bogey's on 10 and 11. The 
previous record was held by 
Anthony Tacconelli, who 
scored 66 and 5-under par 
twice, and 6-under twice by 
Matt Guyton with 67'8. 

Clarion University tied 
with Caniaius College for 
second place with a score of 
599, but won the tie breaker 
to finalize the placement 
and push Canisius into 
third place. 

The Golden Eagles were 
just 13 strokes behind first 
place winners the 
University of Tbronto who 
won with a score of 586. 
Clarion's Nick Sanner 
placed 16th with scores of 
75, 77-152, followed closely 
by teammates Justin Moose 
in 25th place carding 81, 74- 
155, and Mike DeAngelo 
scoring 78, 77-155. 

The team will finish up 
the season this weekend at 



PSAC Chan. 
Hershey. PA. Last year, the 
team finished in fourth 
place, which, according to 
9th year hp^'^ ...n.v, ai 
LeFevre, "wa 
as we had hop 
PSAC squad consists of 
freshmen Schmader and 
Sanner, and seniors Moose 
and Preston Mullens. The 
fifth spot is yet to be deter- 
mined by a playoff between 
juniors Mike DeAngelo and 
Justin Cameron. 

'This year we are look- 
ing to rectify that Schmader 
and Sanner have played 
extremely well this fall," 
said LePevre. T am looking 
for them to do the same this 
weekend. Everyone else 
needs to step it up a notch." 
The PSAC Championship 
will be held in Herahey, PA 
at Wren Dale Golf Club on 
October 20-21 



NFL quart erbacks off to interesting start in the 2007 season 

i> I «>k . Kat7£i K£\on r^i-k-iMr* ^ I Tl I'll- A • 1 - . 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.eclu 

It certainly has been an 
interesting season for NFL 
quarterbacks in 2007. Only 
six weeks into the season, 
and we have already seen 
several records, and several 
quarterbacks, broken. 

Some of the usual sus- 
pects have continued to 
impress while some inexpli- 
cably have struggled. Many 
have fallen to injury and 
some old favorites have 
come back to play like their 
old selves. All that being 
said, here's a look at how 
some of those quarterbacks 



have been doing 

After being 50/50 on 
retirement for about the 
tenth season in row, Brett 
Favre has found some magic 
with a bunch of rookies to 
lead the Packers to a 5-1 
record atop the NFC North. 

In addition to his team's 
success, Favre has added 
some milestones of his own. 
Setting the record for career 
TD passes earlier in the sea- 
son, Favre achieved the 
more dubious distinction of 
most career interceptions 
this past week. 

Everyone who was pre- 
dicting that Tom Brady 
would have a career season 
has been absolutely correct. 
With his stockpile of 



receivers, Brady is leading 
the league in passing yards 
at 1771, just ahead of Favre. 

The Golden Boy is on 
pace to challenge quite a few 
records by the end of this 
year. Besides his personal 
success, he has his Patriots 
off to a perfect 6-0 record. 

Thanks to injuries to 
starter Jake Delhomme and 
backup David Carr, the 
Panthers signed the number 
one overall pick from 1987, 
Vinny Testaverde. 

The decision hasn't 
looked bad thus far as 
Testaverde became the old- 
est starting quarterback in 
NFL history to win a game 
at age 43 last Sunday. 

Team of Destiny favorite 



Arizona has seen their quar- 
terback of the future, Matt 
Leinart, go down for the sea- 
son courtesy of a shoulder 
injury. Never fear 

Cardinals fans because 
Arizona has the poor man's 
Captain Clutch in Kurt 
Warner to step in for him. 
Scratch that, because 
Warner is also out due to 
injury. Thank goodness for 
Tim Rattay. 

Staying with injuries, 
Vince Young appears to be 
the latest victim of the 
Madden curse. After a 
quadriceps injury in the 
Titans 13-10 loss against 
Tampa Bay, Young is being 
listed as day to day. Former 
Panthers and Giants starter 



Kerry Collins will fill in for 
Young until he returns. 

Getting back to Tampa 
Bay, Jeff Garcia is certainly 
doing his best to make 
Philadelphia fans miss him. 
The Eagles and Donovan 
McNabb are struggling to 
stay afloat with a 2-3 record 
in the NFC East, Garcia has 
his Buccaneers sitting atop 
the NFC South at 4-2. 

In Miami, the quarter- 
backing situation has been a 
mess since well before this 
season. In a highly publi- 
cized and rather messy 
affair, the Dolphins did 
everything they could to 
trade Daunte Culpepper 
after acquiring former 
Chiefs quarterback Trent 



Green. 

After a lot of grief on 
both ends, Culpepper was 
finally released before going 
on to sign with Oakland. 
Culpepper has helped the 
Raiders to a 2-3 start, while 
Green is most likely out for 
the year, if not his career 
after suffering a concussion 
earlier this season. 

That is the NFL quar- 
terbacking story thus far for 
2007. Here's to hoping that 
those injured can come back 
healthy, and those healthy 
can stay that way Whoever 
stays on top remains to be 
seen, but if these first six 
weeks are any indication, it 
will be one heck of a ride for 
all involved. 



Boston's D aisuke IVIatsuzaka takes playoff iosses extra hard 

Mii/f3 n;r^it//^r.nr^^ right-handef took Boston's In twn atnrta aoainof ti,Q "tu — >„ _ i ■ _ . ,«.,.„, .„. 



Mike DIGivoanna 
Los Angeles Times 



CLEVEUND - For a solid 
hour after Game 3 on 
Monday night, Daisuke 
Matsuzaka remained in his 
Red Sox uniform, sitting at 
his locker, either staring 
straight ahead or covering 
his face with his hand. Yes, 
you could say the Japanese 



right-hander took Boston's 
4-2 loss to Cleveland hard. 

"I feel bad for him," 
reliever Mike Timlin said 
after the game. "I think he's 
putting a little too much 
pressure on himself." 

You think? Matsuzaka 
seems to have carried the 



In two starts against the 
Angels and Indians, 
Matsuzaka has given up 
seven earned runs and 13 



"There's a learning 
process, but he's not foreign 
to pressure situations or 
playoff games," Timlin said 



to snap out of this funk if he 
is to pitch Game 7 if the 
series goes that far. 

"When the time is right, 



tougher to console a team- 
mate such as Matsuzaka? 

"Hey, baseball is base- 
ball, in Japan, Taiwan, 
Korea, South Florida, 
Minnesota, wherever," 
Timlin said. "We speak 
baseball, and we'll have to 



hits in 9 1/3 innings, strik- before Game 4 on Tuesday we'll say something to him '' 

ing out nine and walking "I don't want to think for Timlin said. "I know you 

five, and he failed to finish him or put words in his guys are worried about 

five innings in both gam^s, a mouth, but maybe he's Dice-K. We're not. This is a 

• , , , ,. . no-decision and a loss. His doing too much with his 30-member family here and find a wav'tn nick hTm^m 

:ri=.;::: =-«-:?z S"z-,=r; ;;.-, ■.■:;;"■- z^^^ 




Flag Football Results 

10/15/07 

Click Clack Untouchables 44-25 

FNR We Cant B T 37-22 

Crimson Cr 3 In 3 Out 42-37 

TheGoonies Team Banks 37-34 

Fly Bait Mean Mach 38-34 

If this Halo KSAC 22-15 

Garden Gno Team 3305 37-21 

Your Mom Lock Down 51-26 

mm 

C Invasion That Team 58-14 

Pen Pushers Little Pi^ F 

Click Clack We Cant BT 49-44 

KSAC Team 3305 24-19 

Little Giants TacklinHose 18-13 

Cookies Mon Mc Lovin F 

C Invasion Cookies Mon 53-44 

Lockdown Garden GnomF 

Franchise Lights Out 46-12 

Tennis Tournament Results 
Women's Champ - Megan Parsons 

(picture next week) 
Men's Champ - Smith vs Burda 

10/16/07 Tournamgnt 

Megan Parsons Morgan Welsh 6-0 
Devin Burda Robb Lawrence n/a 

10/11/07 Tournament 
Megan Parsons Sara Hines 6-0 
Mof|an Welsh SSpecht n/a 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural, Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393- 1 667 



Dodgeball Champs-Men 



10/18/07 





Dodgeball Champs- Women 



Men's - "Grit Nasty" 

Brandon Federici, John Dominic, Nick 
Peria, Bobby Huxta, Dustin Watt 

10/16/07 Champ ionship 

Grit Nasty WewantSheetz 2-1 

Semifine! 

WewantSheea HapaHadles 2-1 
Grit Nasty Cincy Bonties 2-0 

mmrmtf<m4 




Hapa Hadles 
Grit Nasty 
Cincinnati Bonties 
10/10/7 
Dip and Duck 
We Want Sheetz 
Cincinnati Bonties 



Ranch 44 
4 South 
Pandas 



2-1 
2-0 
2-^ 

ZTA 2-0 

HapaHadles 2-0 
The Pandas 2-0 



Women's - **Dip & Duck" 

Stephanie Estok, Marissa Myers, Lauren 
Stauber. Nicole Lollo, Sammi Overdorff, 
Rachelle Youger 

10/16/07 Championship 

Dip & Duck ZTA 2-0 

HA Dodge & Dive n/a 

Outdoor Soccer Results 

10/15/07 Play-Oft 

Reffner's MomKF Boneheads4-3 OT 



CU Staff 
ZTA 

We Love B 
10/15/07 
Maria Martin 
In your fece 
We Love B 
10/10/07 
Maria Martin 
We Love B 
Ttteeamm2 



Pork Chop II 

10/10/07 

Barbous 
Dunlap 



Barbous 3-3(4-1) 
Double OT Shoot-out' 

Porkchop II F 
Pork Chops 6-2 



Palntbail Trip 

Sunday, Oct 21. Sign-up at the REC 
Center. Cost is $15 per person which 
includes 500 rounds of paint and all 
equipment 

Volleyball Results 

10/16/07 

Yes or No 21-16,24-22 

CU's Finest 21-18,21-12 

AthI Chain 21-13,21-0 

AthlChallll 21-17,21-19 

Wolverines 21-10, 16-21.15-8 
No Names F 

Wolverines 21-13, 11-21,15-9 
CU Staff 21-6,21-17 
Delta Zeta 21-19,21-16 

CLUB SPORT CORNER 

In-Line Hockey Club - Improved their 
record to 3-0 by lambasting Carnegie Mellon 
7-0. Next game 10/18 verses Pitt 
Women's Rugby Club - Lost to Slippery 
Rock 7-29 last Saturday. Home this Saturday 
in a double header verses Erie at noon and 
Ohio Northern at 2pm. 
Men's Rugby Odb - Defeated Robert 
Morris 24-22 last Saturday. Travel to 
Franciscan Saturday. 



■■i 



Page 10 



TM CLMIOH CALL 



October 18. 2007 



M): ScUerit^ihoolplf record 



Sfirts 

Volleyball defeats Lock Haven for second time this season 3-1 



improves to ly 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.eclu 

CLARION. Oct 17-Libero, 
Vicky Gentile called it the 
the biggest win of her col- 
lege career when her Golden 
Eagles defeated Lock Haven 
back on September L5. 
Clarion had defeated the 
Bald Eagles for the first 
time since 2002 with a 3-1 
win against them at Thomas 
Field House in Lock Haven. 
On IXiesday night, this time 
in Clarion, the Golden 
Eagles looked to accomplish 
another first since 2002 by 
attempting to sweep the 
Bald Ragles. 

Despite a fierce effort 
from Lock Haven, Clarion 
came out on top again with 
another 3-1 victory against 
the Bald Eagles. Clarion 
won the first game by a 
score of 30-20. After losing 
the second game 30-21, the 
Golden Eagles stormed back 
to win games three and four 
by scores of 30-16 and 30-22 
respectively. 

Senior Sarah Fries led 
the way once again for 
Clarion. Coming off a team- 
leading 14 kill performance 
against Edinboro, Fries led 
all Golden Eagle hitters 
with 20 kills and five service 
aces. 

Christina Steiner added 




The Golden Eagles volleyball team defeated Lock Haven for the second time this season with their 3-1 victory " Tuesday night The 
victory marked the first time since 2002 that Clarion swept the Bald Eagles. (The Clarion Call/iess Lasher) 



18 kills of her own as well as 
three service aces. Also tal- 
lying 11 digs, Steiner is now 
one dig away from becoming 
the third player in school 
history to have 1,000 career 
kills and 1,000 career digs. 

Nicole Andrusz had nine 
kills and two blocks, and 
Gentile picked up 27 digs. 
Setter Kristi Fiorillo had a 
phenomenal all-around 
game of her own, picking up 



four service aces, four kills, 
13 digs, and 54 set assists. 

Freshmen hitter Leeann 
Higginbotham also had a 
nice game, picking up the 
last kill in the Golden 
Eagle's victory. Delighted to 
be the player who got the 
deciding point, 

Higginbotham said, "It felt 
great. You work hard in 
practice to get better, and 
you just have to make the 



most of your opportunity 
when you get it." 

Echoing similar senti- 
ments was head coach 
Jennifer Harrison. "It felt 
great to pick up this win," 
said Harrison. "I think we 
had something to prove. 
Some people thought our 
last win against Lock Haven 
was a fluke, but that was 
definitely not the case 
tonight." 



When last week's 
regional rankings were 
released, Lock Haven was 
ranked third while Clarion 
was ranked fourth. The 
Golden Eagles' eyes are on 
the prize of a PSAC-West 
title, but the ranking did not 
exactly slip their minds. 
"We wanted to prove that we 
were a better team, and I 
think we did that tonight," 
said sophomore Katie 



Aurand. 

When asked about the 
ranking subject Coach 
Harrison said, "We're hop- 
ing for a better ranking with 
the win (against Lock 
Haven), but it really comes 
down to where things finish, 
and also how they end up." 
Clarion improved to 19- 
3 overall with a 5-2 record in 
the PSAC-West. The confer- 
ence win ensures that the 
Golden Eagles will at least 
have a .500 mark in their 
section for the first time 
since 2004. That year's 
Golden Eagle squad finished 
at 6-4 in the PSAC-West. 
With three conference 
games remaining against 
California, lUP, and 
Edinboro, this year's team 
will look to eclipse that 
mark. 

After playing only three 
matches in the last three 
weeks. Clarion will play 
three matches in two days 
this Friday and Saturday 
when they host PSAC-East 
cross-over matches. The 
Golden Eagles will compete 
against Cheyney on Friday- 
before playing Kutztown 
and Millersville Saturday. 
Game time against Cheyney 
is scheduled for 7:15 p.m. 
Clarion's next PSAC-West 
match will be next Tuesday 
at California. That game is 
scheduled for 7 p.m. 



Football jumps out to an early lead but SRU rallies for the win 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscritchf@clarion,eciu 

SLIPPERY ROCK, Oct 13- 

On Saturday at N. Kerr 
Thompson Stadium, the 
Golden Eagles got out to an 
early lead, but it was even- 
tually the same old story as 
they fell to Slippery Rock 
41-18. 

The Golden Eagle 
offense played well, as they 
had 383 yards of total 
offense, including 303 pass- 
ing and 80 rushing. The 
defense, however, allowed 
493 yards of total offense, 
including 382 rushing and 
111 passing. 

The Golden Eagles came 
out firing, as Nick Sipes 
kicked a 30-yard field goal 
with 10:16 remaining in the 
first quarter to give Clarion 
a 3-0 lead. Slippery Rock 
then fumbled the ensuing 
kickoff, and Quentyn Brazil 
recovered at the Rock 40. 

Clarion drove down to 
the one, and on fourth and 




The Golden Eagles football team dropped their record to 0-7 with their 41-18 loss at Slippery 
Rock. Clarion will travel to Falrmount State this Saturday Oct. 20 to take on the Fighting Falcons. 
(The Clarion Ca///Archive Photo) 



one. Coach Jay Foster decid- 
ed to go for the touchdown 
and got it on a straight 
handoff to Eddie 

Emmanuel. They missed 



the PAT, but were now out to 
a 9-0 lead with 6:58 remain- 
ing. 

The Rock answered with 
a 6 play, 74-yard drive 



capped by a 23-yard touch- 
down pass from Nate 
Crookshank to Paul Favers, 
to cut the Clarion lead to 9- 
7. The Golden Eagles had a 



response to that drive with 
one of their own. 

They drove from their 
own 42 to the Slippery Rock 
9 before Robert Mamula 
booted a 28-yard field goal 
for a 12-7 lead. After a 74- 
yard drive on their second 
possession, the Rock scored 
again. Ryan Lehmeier 
scored on a 7-yard run with 
10:25 left in the second to 
put the Rock ahead 14-12. 

Slippery Rock was not 
done, unfortunately, as 
Lehmeier scored on his sec- 
ond of four rushing touch- 
downs, a 15-yard sprint, to 
extend the Rock lead to 21- 
12 with 1:42 remaining. 

The third quarter was 
pretty quiet scoring wise, 
until Lehmeier ran 22 yards 
for his third touchdown, 
padding the Rock's lead to 
28-12. Eddie Emmanuel, 
with 58 seconds remaining 
in the third, scored his sec- 
ond touchdown of the game, 
on an 8-yard run, to pull the 
Golden Eagles closer, at 28- 
18, due to the two-point con- 
version failing. 



Just 38 seconds later 
the Rock responded, with a 
32-yard touchdown run by 
qtiElt-terback 2Vato 

Crookshank to pad their 
lead, 35-18. Lehmeier ran 
for an 8-yard touchdown 
run, his fourth of the game, 
to put the Rock ahead 41-18. 

Clarion quarterback 
Tyler Huether, returning 
from his hand injury, went 
23-34 for 303 yards, and 
running back Eddie 
Emmanuel rushed 15 times 
for 37 yards and two touch- 
downs. 

For Slippery Rock, quar- 
terback Nate Crookshank 
completed 10 of 15 passes 
for 111 yards, and running 
back Ryan Lehmeier ran 23 
times for 210 yards, and 
scored four times. 

This coming Saturday, 
Clarion (0-7) travels to 
Fairmont State for a 6 p.m. 
start, while Slippery Rock, 
(6-1), travels to 

Shippensburg for a 1 p.m. 
game time. 



i 



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Mock accident 
raises awareness 







Hip-Hop legend 
visits Clarion 
University 



•^ t^^' 



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Rombach sisters 
compete at 
PSAC's 



One copy free 




THEC 



Clarion. Pennsylvania 16214 



Second MRSA case confirmed 



Volume 94 Issue 7 



Octooer 25, 2007 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoebler@clanon,edu 

CLARION, Oct. 23 - Just 
one week after the first con- 
firmed case of mathicillin- 
resistant staphylococcus 
aureus (MRSA) on the 
Clarion University campus, 
one additional case of MRSA 
has been confirmed. 

After university officials 
were made aware of this 
infection, which is a type of 
staph that is resistant to 
antibiotics, 400 athletes 
were screened and culture 
tests were taken intially 
from 39 athletes that had 
any cuts or open wounds. 

Additionally, 10 stu- 
dents reported to the 
Keeling Health Center and 
were tested last Thursday. 

As of yesterday, more 
than 200 cultures taken and 
sent for testing 

Of the screened stu- 
dents, both confirmed cases 
of MRSA were members of 
the university football team. 

Director of Athletics at 
Clarion University, David 
Katis said he was made 
6iwflre of the first case of 
MRSA by Keeling Health 
Center after the student 
went to the health center for 
medical review. 

The university took 
immediate action upon rec- 
ognizing the contagious 
infection and extensively 
cleaned all athletic facili- 
ties, equipment and resi- 
dence halls with a bleach 
solution. 

Select areas of the 
Student Recreation Center 
and restrooms were also 
cleaned. 

The university contact- 
ed the United States 
Department of Health for 
advice on the matter. 

"The first student had 




Clarion UniVers/ty cleaned several areas across campus, includ- 
ing the TTppfn fdwer rooms. (Tfmt^ i l u f i Ctrff/ A ntJf Lan d a rf 



his infection covered and the 
university has made an 
effort to clean every area on 
campus that could have a 
large chance of infecting 
other students," said Vice 
President of University 
Relations Ron Wilshire. 
"Unlike a contained build- 
ing or buildings at a second- 
ary school, it would be 
unlikely if every surface of 
university buildings and 
equipments could be 
cleaned." 

The university hosted a 
special program, "MRSA: 
The Ticking Time Bomb," on 
Monday evening in 
Marwick-Boyd. The pro- 



minute video arid a power 
point presentation entitled, 
"Getting to Know MRSA," 
which was presented by Dr. 
Homer Schreckengost, a 
board certified Family 
Practice Physician and the 
director of the Family 
Practice Residency Program 
at Clarion Hospital. 

The program was open 
to all students and employ- 
ees, and most athletic teams 
were required by their 
coaches to attend. 

"At first we were all 
kind of confused about what 
was going on, but trainers 
and coaches helped us out 
and we were relatively calm 



Tomblin, a freshman mem- 
ber of the soccer team and a 
mass media arts and jour- 
nalism major. "[At the pro- 
gram] we were informed on 
what MRSA was exactly ... 
we learned what the symp- 
toms were, what it looked 
like and how it is spread 
from open wounds to other 
open wounds through sport- 
ing equipment." 

Since the first confirmed 
case of MRSA, students 
have received several uni- 
versity wide e-mails inform- 
ing them of updates on the 
infection and also precau- 
tionary measures that 
should be taken. 

The MRSA program also 
reiterated the precautions 
that should be taken, not 
just by athletic team mem- 
bers, but all students and 
staff. 

The university recom- 
mends the following to pre- 
vent the spread of MRSA: 

■ Keep your hands clean by 
washing thoroughly with 
soap and water or using an 
alcohol-based hand sanitiz- 
er. 

■ Keep cuts and scrapes 
clean and covered with a 
bandage until healed. 

■ Avoid contact with other 
people's wounds or bandag- 
es. 

■ Avoid sharing personal 
items such as towels or 
razors. 

"It is recommended that 
all students and employees 
with worrisome infections or 
openings in the skin seek 
medical review," according 
to University Relations. 

"This is a developing sit- 
uation and the university 
will review efforts to 
increase education and 
scheduled cleaning of ath- 
letic facilities," said 
Wilshire. 




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gram included a nine- about it," said Kayla 




Clarion Honors Program to host 42ncl annual conference 



Stephanie Desmond 
Clarion Call Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

Donald Baum 
Clarion Call staff writer 

CLARION, Oct. 24 - 
Clarion University's Honors 
Program will host the 42nd 
annual National Collegiate 
Honors Council (NCHC) 
Conference in Denver, Colo. 
This year's theme is 
"Creative Tensions, 

Challenging Environment" 
and it will be held from Oct. 
31 to Nov. 4. 

"It is a huge deal that 
Clarion is hosting this years 
conference. This gives our 
Honors Program an oppor- 
tunity to get our name out 
there in the national honors 
community," said Chris 
Wike, a junior English 
major. 

The NCHC is an organi- 
zation of over 800 honors 




Logo of the 2007 National Collegiate Honors Council conference, which will be hosted by the 
CUP Honors Program in Denver, Colorado. (The Clarion Call/ Dr Hallie Savage) 



programs and colleges from 
across the nation. 

According to the confer- 
ence program, the 2007 
NCHC conference will be 
focusing on new strands in 
art, fine art and environ- 
mental programs. 

"Clarion's name will 
now be recognized on a 
national basis, which is a 
great achievement for a 
mid-sized Western 

Pennsylvania institution." 
said Lucas Schaeffer, a sen- 
ior international business 
major. 

Dr. Hallie Savage, direc- 
tor of CUP's Honors 
Program, is this year's 
NCHC president. She is also 
this year's conference chair. 
Along with Lynn Hepfl, hon- 
ors program coordinator: Dr. 
Brent Register, honors pro- 
gram assistant director: and 
members of the honors office 
staff. Savage planned and 
coordinated the conference. 
"For the faculty and staff, 
it was a challenge to organ- 



ize the program and confer- 
ence activities," said 
Savage. "For example, we 
observed that arts in honors 
education required develop- 
ment in many undergradu- 
ate programs. Therefore, 
Register took on the chal- 
lenge of designing the 
appropriate forums." 

Savage said the main 
planning for the conference 
was a three-part process. 
First, they sent a call for 
presentation proposals to all 
of the honors programs 
across the country. Second, 
they met to accept which 
proposals would be fea- 
tured. Third, thev arranged 
the program, moderators, 
audio/visual equipment and 
space for each presentation. 

Other duties included 
booking the hotel, finding 
speakers, planning the 
events, and organizing 
meals. 

See "NCHC" 
continued on page 2. 





IPtAtNti 




Friday 




I 



Page 10 



THE CLARION CALL 



Sfirts 



October 18. 2007 



Todii): .VhiiiailiT wh sriioiil golf rei iird liilhliall jinpriiii-s In ID-:! 



Volleyball defeats Lock Haven for second time this season 3-1 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@ciarion,edu 

CLARION. Oct IT-Libero. 
Vicky Ocntik' calk'd it the 
the hitjgi'st win of her col- 
lege career when her Golden 
Eagles defeated Lock Haven 
hack nil September ]."). 
riannn had defeated the 
Bald Eagles for the first 
time since 2002 with a 3-1 
win against them at Thomas 
Field House in Lock Haven. 
On 'l\iesday night, this time 
in Clarion, the Golden 
Eagles looked to accomplish 
another first since 2002 by 
attempting to sweep the 
Bald Eagles. 

Despite a tierce effort 
from Luck Hav(>n. Clarion 
cniiit (lui nil top again with 
another Ml victor\' against 
the Bald Eagles. Clarion 
won the first game by a 
scor(> of aO-20. After losing 
tlu' MTiiiid game ;i()-2]. the 
<;ol(icn Knglcs st<irmed back 
to win games three and four 
by scores of 30-1 (i and 30-22 
respectively. 

Senior Sarah Fries led 
the wny once again for 
Clarion. Coming off a team- 
leading 14 kill performance 
against Kdinboro. Fries led 
all (iolden Eagle hitters 
with 20 kills and five service 
aces, 

Christina Steiner added 




The Golden Eagles volleyball team defeated Lock Haven for the second time this season with their 3-1 victory on Tuesday night The 
victory marked the first time since 2002 that Clarion swept the Bald Eagles. (The Clarion Call/iess Lasher) 



18 kills of her own as well as 
three service aces. Also tal- 
lying 11 digs. Steiner is now- 
one dig away from becoming 
the third player in school 
history to have 1,000 career 
kills and 1,000 career digs. 

Nicole Andrusz had nine 
kills and two blocks, and 
Gentile picked up 27 digs. 
Setter Kristi Fiorillo had a 
phenomenal all-around 
game of her own, picking up 



four service aces, four kills, 
13 digs, and 54 set assists. 

Freshmen hitter Leeann 
Higginbotham also had a 
nice game, picking up the 
last kill in the Golden 
Eagle's victory. Delighted to 
be the player who got the 
deciding point, 

Higginbotham said, "It felt 
great. You work hard in 
practice to get better, and 
you just have to make the 



most of your opportunity 
when you get it." 

Echoing similar senti- 
ments was head coach 
Jennifer Harrison. "It felt 
great to pick up this win," 
said Harrison. "I think we 
had something to prove. 
Some people thought our 
last win against Lock Haven 
was a fluke, but that was 
definitely not the case 
tonight.' 



When last week's 
regional rankings were 
released, Lock Haven was 
ranked third while Clarion 
was ranked fourth. The 
Golden Eagles' eyes are on 
the prize of a PSAC-West 
title, but the ranking did not 
exactly slip their minds. 
"We wanted to prove that we 
were a better team, and I 
think we did that tonight," 
said sophomore Katie 



Aurand. 

When asked about the 
ranking subject Coach 
Harrison said, "We're hop- 
ing for a better ranking with 
the win (against Lock 
Haven), but it really comes 
down to where things finish, 
and also how they end up." 
Clarion improved to 19- 
3 overall with a 5-2 record in 
the PSAC-West. The confer- 
ence win ensures that the 
Golden Eagles will at least 
have a .500 mark in their 
section for the first time 
since 2004. That year's 
Golden Eagle squad finished 
at 6-4 in the PSAC-West. 
With three conference 
games remaining against 
California, lUP, and 
Edinboro, this year's team 
will look to eclipse that 
mark. 

After playing only three 
matches in the last three 
weeks, Clarion will play 
three matches in two days 
this Friday and Saturday 
when they host PSAC-East 
cross-over matches. The 
Golden Eagles will compete 
against Cheyney on Friday 
before playing Kutztown 
and Millersville Saturday. 
Game time against Cheyney 
is scheduled for 7: 15 p.m. 
Clarion's next PSAC-West 
match will be next Tuesday 
at California. That game is 
scheduled for 7 p.m. 



Football jumps out to an early lead but SRU rallies for the win 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscritchf@clarion.eclu 

SLIPPERY ROCK. Oct 13- 

On Saturday at N. Kerr 
Thompson Stadium, the 
Golden Eagles got out to an 
early lead, hut it was even- 
tually the same old story as 
they fell to Slipperv Rock 
41-kS. 

The Golden Eagle 
offense played well, as they 
had 383 yards of total 
offense, including 303 pass- 
ing and 80 rushing. The 
defeiis(>. however, allowed 
49:i \ar(ls ol total offense, 
iiicluditig 3S2 rushing and 
! 1 1 passing. 

The Golden Eagles came 
out firing, as Nick Sipes 
kicked a .ill-yard field goal 
with l():!i) remaining in the 
first (luarter to give Clarion 
a M-O lead. Slippery Rock 
then rumbled the ensuing 
kickolT. and (^uentyn Brazil 
I'l'CdM ivd at the Rock 40. 

Clarion drove down to 
th^' line, and on fourth and 




The Golden Eagles football team dropped their record to 0-7 with their 41-18 loss at Slippery 
Rock. Clarion will travel to Fairmount State this Saturday Oct. 20 to take on the Fighting Falcons. 
(The Clarion Ca///Archive Photo) 



one. Coach Jay Foster decid- 
ed to go for the touchdown 
and got it on a straight 
handoff to Eddie 

Emmanuel. They missed 



the PAT, but were now out to 
a 9-0 lead with 6:58 remain- 
ing. 

The Rock answered with 
a 6 play, 74-yard drive 



capped by a 23-yard touch- 
down pass from Nate 
Crookshank to Paul Favers, 
to cut the Clarion lead to 9- 
7. The Golden Eagles had a 



response to that drive with 
one of their own. 

They drove from their 
own 42 to the Slippery Rock 
9 before Robert Mamula 
booted a 28-yard field goal 
for a 12-7 lead. After a 74- 
yard drive on their second 
possession, the Rock scored 
again. Ryan Lehmeier 
scored on a 7-yard run with 
10:25 left in the second to 
put the Rock ahead 14-12. 

Slippery Rock was not 
done, unfortunately, as 
Lehmeier scored on his sec- 
ond of four rushing touch- 
downs, a 15-yard sprint, to 
extend the Rock lead to 21- 
12 with 1:42 remaining. 

The third quarter was 
pretty quiet scoring wise, 
until Lehmeier ran 22 yards 
for his third touchdown, 
padding the Rock's lead to 
28-12. Eddie Emmanuel, 
with 58 seconds remaining 
in the third, scored his sec- 
ond touchdown of the game, 
on an 8-yard run, to pull the 
Golden Eagles closer, at 28- 
18, due to the two-point con- 
version failing. 



Just 38 seconds later 
the Rock responded, with a 
32-yard touchdown run by 
quarterback Nau- 

Crookshank to pad their 
lead, 35-18. Lehmeier ran 
for an 8-yard touchdown 
run, his fourth of the game, 
to put the Rock ahead 41-18. 

Clarion quarterback 
Tyler Huether, returning 
from his hand injury, went 
23-34 for 303 yards, and 
running back Eddie 
Emmanuel rushed 15 times 
for 37 yards and two touch- 
downs. 

For Slippery Rock, quar- 
terback Nate Crookshank 
completed 10 of 15 passes 
for 111 yards, and running 
back Ryan Lehmeier ran 23 
times for 210 yards, and 
scored four times. 

This coming Saturday, 
Clarion (0-7) travels to 
Fairmont State for a 6 p.m. 
start, while Slippery Rock, 
(6-1), travels to 

Shippensburg for a 1 p.m. 
game time. 



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i'CALL 



Volume 94 Issue 7 



October 25, 2007 



Second MRSA case confirmed 



Brittnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_beKoebler@cldrion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 23 -lust 
ont' week after the first con- 
firmed case of mathicillin- 
resistant staphylococcus 
aureus (MRSA) on the 
Clarion University campus, 
one additional case of MRSA 
has been confirmed. 

After university offi(nals 
were made aware of this 
infection, which is a type of 
staph that is resistant to 
antibiotics, 400 athletes 
were screened and culture 
tests were taken intially 
from 39 athletes that had 
any cuts or open wounds. 

Additionally. 10 stu- 
dents reported to the 
Keeling Health Center and 
were tested last Thursday. 

As of yesterday, more 
than 200 cultures taken and 
sent for testing 

Of the screened stu- 
dents, both confirmed cases 
of MRSA were members of 
the university football team. 

Director of Athletics at 
Clarion University, David 
Katis said he was made 
aware of the first case of 
MRSA by Keeling Health 
Center after the student 
went to the health center for 
medical review. 

The university took 
immediate action upon rec- 
ognizing the contagious 
infection and extensively 
cleaned all athletic facili- 
ties, equipment and resi- 
dence halls with a bleach 
solution. 

Select areas of the 
Student Recreation Center 
and restrooms were also 
cleaned. 

The university contact- 
ed the United States 
Department of Health for 
advice on the matter. 

"The first student had 




Clarion University cleaned several areas across campus, includ- 
ing the Tippin locker rooms. (The Clarion Call/ Andy Lander) 



his infection covered and the 
university has made an 
effort to clean every area on 
campus that could have a 
large chance of infecting 
other students," said Vice 
President of University 
Relations Ron Wilshire. 
"Unlike a contained build- 
ing or buildings at a second- 
ary school, it would be 
unlikely if every surface of 
university buildings and 
equipments could be 
cleaned." 

The university hosted a 
special program, "MRSA: 
The Ticking Time Bomb," on 
Monday evening in 
Marwick-Boyd. The pro- 
gram included a nine- 



minute video and a power 
point presentation entitled, 
"Getting to Know MRSA," 
which was presented by Dr. 
Homer Schreckengost, a 
board certified Family 
Practice Physician and the 
director of the Family 
Practice Residency Program 
at Clarion Hospital. 

The program was open 
to all students and employ- 
ees, and most athletic teams 
were required by their 
coaches to attend. 

"At first we were all 
kind of confused about what 
was going on, but trainers 
and coaches helped us out 
and we were relatively calm 
about it," said Kayla 



Tomblin, a freshman mem- 
ber of the soccer team and a 
!iiass media arts and jour- 
nalism major. "lAt the pro- 
gram] we were informed on 
what MRSA was e.xactly ... 
we learned what the symp- 
toms were, what it looked 
like and how it is spread 
from open wounds to other 
open wounds through sport- 
ing equipment." 

Since the first confirmed 
case of MRSA, students 
have received several uni- 
versity wide e-mails inform- 
ing them of updates on the 
infection and also precau- 
tionary measures that 
should be taken. 

The MRSA program also 
reiterated the precautions 
that should be taken, not 
just by athletic team mem- 
bers, but all students and 
staff. 

The university recom- 
mends the following to pre- 
vent the spread of MRSA: 

■ Keep your hands clean by 
washing thoroughly with 
soap and water or using an 
alcohol-based hand sanitiz- 
er, 

■ Keep cuts and scrapes 
clean and covered with a 
bandage until healed. 

■ Avoid contact with other 
people's wounds or bandag- 
es. 

■ Avoid sharing personal 
items such as towels or 
razors. 

"It is recommended that 
all students and employees 
with worrisome infections or 
openings in the skin seek 
medical review," according 
to University Relations. 

"This is a developing sit- 
uation and the university 
will review efforts to 
increase education and 
scheduled cleaning of ath- 
letic facilities," said 
Wilshire. 



Student senate 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s Jmfichard©clarion edu 



CLARION. Oct. 22- 
Student senate approved 
two policy changes per- 
taining to the allocation of 
funding to Recognized 
Student Organizations 
(RSOs) for conferences, 
including a policy change 
requisitioning funds. 

The first policy change 
took effect immediately 
upon being passed by the 
senate in September. The 
change, which is located 
under Appropriations 
Allocations, puts a limit 
onto how many events an 
RSO can request money to 
attend. 

According to the new 
policy, an RSO request 
fon^ng to attend two con- 
ferences. 

The change specifical- 
ly states that, "Each 
organization will be fund- 
ed for no more than two 



RSOs arc iMwrttuI to 
place regio ! ottu v 

local con ft I n their 

submitted hud^'ti at thr 
beginning of the \ear. ' 

The second change 
took ii!, I , on Oct. 15 and 
was an addition to the 
Financial Affair 

This modifuaUiiii cre- 
ated specific guidelines 
that all K80.S must follow 
if they wish to receive 
funding. Aceordiiu^ to tho^ 
policy, "Any request for 
additional allocations 
must l>e submitted at least 
four weeks m advance to 
the Appropriations 

Committee. 

Supplemental, capital, 
and large item capital allo- 
cations are for specific 
purposes not previously 
allocated to the RSO" 

Walsh said that this 
change was a matter of 
convenience for the sen- 
ate. 

"We had people sub- 
mitting requests exactly 
at the original two week 



ClJ 



I f»|Uii'i'iueti 



and 



lai 



in one aQademic year. 

The i Appropriations 
Committee may fund only 
one conference in the ini- 
tial budget for each organ- 
ization in one academic 
year (national conferences 
will not be funded in the 
initial budget). However, 
if throughout the year, 
other conference opportu- 
nities arise, organizations 
can request supplemental 
funds from the student 
senate." 

According to student 
senate parliamentarian 
David Walsh, 'The policy 
change only applifjs to 
national conferences and 



Allocations Comnnttee 
didn't have enough time to 
process all of these 
requests, especially if we 
had to cancel a meeting," 
said Walsh. "This new pol- 
icy just gives them some 
more time to handle all of 
the request.s." 

Approval forms for 
such requests are avail- 
able in the CSA Business 
Office and the Student 
Senate Office. 

Student senate will 
meet every Monday until 
December 3. Their first 
meeting of the Spring 
semester will be Jan. 14, 
2008. 



Clarion Honors Program to host 42nd annual conference 



Stephanie Desmond 

Clarion Call Features Editor 

s_saclesmond@clation.edu 

Donald Baum 
Clarion Call staff Writer 

CLARION, Oct. 24 - 

Clarion University's Honors 
Program will host the 42nd 
annual National Collegiate 
Honors Council (NCHC) 
Conference in Denver, Colo. 
This year's theme is 
"Creative Tensions, 

Challenging p]nvironment" 
and it will be held from Oct. 
31 to Nov. 4. 

"It is a huge deal that 
Clarion is hosting this years 
conference. This gives our 
Honors Program an oppor- 
tunity to get our name out 
there in the national honors 
community," said Chris 
Wike, a junior English 
major. 

The NCHC is an organi- 
zation of over 800 honors 




Logo of the 2007 National Collegiate Honors Council conference, which will be hosted by the 
CUP Honors Program in Denver, Colorado. (The Clarion Call/ Dr Hallie Savage) 



programs and colleges from 
across the nation. 

According to the confer- 
ence program, the 2007 
NCHC conference will be 
focusing on new strands in 
art. fine art and environ- 
mental programs. 

"Clarion's name will 
now be recognized on a 
national basis, which is a 
great achievement for a 
mid-sized Western 

Pennsylvania institution," 
said Lucas Schaeffer, a sen- 
ior international business 
major. 

Dr. Hallie Savage, direc- 
tor of CUP'S Honors 
Program, is this year's 
NCHC president. She is also 
this year's conference chair. 
.Along with Lynn Hepfl. hon- 
ors program coordinator: Dr. 
Brent Register, honors pro- 
gram assistant director: and 
members of the honors office 
staff. Savage planned and 
coordinated the conference. 
"For the faculty and staff. 
it was a challenge to organ- 




The Darion Calf 



VIEATHIil 

Forecast by Dr. Airthooy Vega 



A quick 

13 fblknR<i ^ tA» 



'^sa&. 



ThufS(by 










Friday 






ize the program and confer- 
ence activities." said 
Savage. "Fur i'\ani|)lc, we 
observed that arts in honors 
education required develop- 
ment in many undergradu- 
ate jiroiii'anis. Therefore, 
Register look mi the chal- 
lenge of designing the 
appropriate fcn'ums," 

Savage said the main 
planning for the cnnlerenee 
was a three-pai't process. 
First, they sent a call for 
presentation proposals to all 
of the honors programs 
acros.< till ^'lUiitrw Seeniiil, 
the\ met \<, :iirt.|)t which 
proposals would be fea- 
tured. Third, ;hev arranged 
the program, moderators. 
audio/vi-iial equipment and 
space for each presentation. 

Other duties included 
booking the hotel, findin-a 
speakers, planning the 
events, and organizing 
meals. 

See "NCHC" 
continued on page 2. 



it^ 



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I mm: SSOHsRgSS " .OW; » 0K8ffi5. 



H^H.«:(»^©'' .ijm'nm&m^ 



Page 2 



ItWS 




October 25. 2007 



Faculty senate discusses MRSA incident 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_ieerickson @clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 22 ~ On 
October 22 faculty senate 
met to discuss the recently 
confirmed cases of MRSA. 

"We have screened 500- 
600 people so far," said 
President Joseph 

Grunenwald. 'There were 
two confirmed cases as a 
result of those screenings." 

The first confirmed case 
of MRSA was a Clarion foot- 
ball player that had an 
ingrown hair that didn't 
look normal. That individ- 
ual told a member of the 
coaching staff and then 
sought medical review. 

Since the first confirmed 
case the university has been 
taking safety precautions to 
make sure that this doesn't 
spread any further. They 
have screened every athlete, 
sanitized parts of every 
building such as railings 
that will be touched by 
many people, sent emails to 
warn students and faculty 
and left messages on 



answering machines in fac- 
ulty offices. 

Grunenwald said, "This 
might be an overreaction, 
but this is our first time 
going through this kind of 
situation." 

At the beginning of the 
meeting the Faculty Senate 
president and professor of 
modern languages Dr. 
Elisabeth Donato read the 
newest announcements. 
The announcements includ- 
ed the Study Abroad Fair on 
October 23 in Carlson 
Library, award-winning doc- 
umentary producer Lisa 
Gensheimer will speak at 
the Venango Campus on 
November 1, and Clarion 
University faculty promo- 
tion/tenure will be recog- 
nized on October 23 at the 
annual reception in Carlson 
Library. 

President Grunenwald 
also touched on the perform- 
ance funding that the uni- 
versity received through the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education. The 
university is receiving less 
performance indicator fund- 



ing than expected and less 
performance indicator fund- 
ing than last year. 

"We have twenty to 
twenty five new internation- 
al students this year, and 
that makes up for most of 
the loss," said Grunenwald. 
Grunenwald also 
talked about how college 
courses offered to high 
school students is hurting 
the amount of tuition money 
that the university receives. 
Seniors in high school are 
able to take college courses 
and receive credits a year 
early When college courses 
are taken in high school, 
money is taken away from 
those colleges that the stu- 
dents will attend. 

After the president 
spoke a Student Senate 
representative said that the 
meeting for October 22 was 
cancelled due to the MRSA 
informational meeting. 

Also, she announced 
that the Student Senate will 
be sponsoring the Social 
Equity Dinner on November 
14. 

Professor of Physics, Dr 



Sharon Montgomery was 
the representative for the 
budget committee. She 
announced that her commit- 
tee is meeting with Paul 
Bylaska on November 6 to 
discuss funding. 

Montgomery said, "Most 
of our questions will be 
about the performance indi- 
cator funding." 

Professor of Education, 
Sue Courson of institutional 
resources announced that 
the library subcommittee 
met and set goals. 

The last update came 
from the representative 
from Venango, biology pro- 
fessor, David Lott. 

He announced that 
there were three co-curricu- 
lar activities last week, and 
that there was a good 
turnout for each. Clarion 
University political science 
professor Barry Sweet mod- 
erated one of the activities 
which was a satellite confer- 
ence. 

At the next meeting fac- 
ulty senate will talk about 
the schedule for finals and 
also about the new calendar. 



B[|| would add U.S. funds to fight staph spread 



Delthia Ricks 
Washington Post 

MELVILLE, NY - The ris- 
ing incidence of drug-resist- 
ant staph infections has 
prompted a bipartisan fed- 
eral measure that would 
provide $5 million in emer- 
gency funding to combat a 
potentially lethal agent that 
increasingly is emerging in 
schools, gyms and even day- 
care centers. 

Sen. Charles Schumer, 
D-N.Y., on Wednesday 
called on President Bush to 
remove his threat of a veto 
from a bill that provides 
money for public education 
campaigns aimed at pre- 
venting the spread of methi- 
cillin-resistant 
Staphylococcus aureus 
(MRSA). 



For years, MRSA was a 
threat to people in hospitals 
and nursing homes, but now 
it has moved into communi- 
ties, causing infections 
among otherwise healthy 
people. 

The bacterium thwarts 
methicillin, the bolder 
cousin of penicillin, as well 
as antibiotics in the more 
potent drug family known 
as the cephlasporins. 
MRSA. 

The new bill would pro- 
vide money to fund public 
education campaigns that 
spread the word on preven- 
tion. 

The bill will be consid- 
ered by a joint House and 
Senate conference commit- 
tee before moving to the 
president. 

Last week, a study by 



epidemiologists at the 
Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention found that 
94,000 people become infect- 
ed with MRSA annually in 
the United States and near- 
ly 19,000 people die of the 
infections. Schumer cited 
more than 50 serious cases 
in the metropolitan area 
since 2005, including one 
reported on Long Island on 
Tuesday. 

A Virginia teen died last 
week of an untreatable 
MRSA infection, and eight 
high school students in New 
Jersey have been diagnosed 
with tough-to-treat MRSA 
infections, Schumer said. 

Schumer said eradicat- 
ing MRSA should be put 
above politics. 

Dr. Bruce Hirsch, a spe- 
cialist in infectious diseases 



at North Shore University 
Hosptial in Manhasset, said 
many people carry staph 
bacteria on their skin and in 
their noses without compli- 
cations. However, the mis- 
use, abuse and overuse of 
antibiotics has created a 
drug-resistant form of the 
bug that cannot be easily 
quelled. 

In people with weak- 
ened immunity or open 
wounds, MRSA can prove 
problematic, Hirsch said, 
because it can be difficult to 
fight. He said the resistant 
organism's prevalence is 
driven by the unnecessary 
use of antibiotics. 

"We can't afford unnec- 
essary antibiotics. We also 
can't afford the complica- 
tions," Hirsch said. 



"NCHC" 

continued from front 
page. 

Many activities and forums 
will take place, including 
several from Clarion stu- 
dents and faculty. 

Presentations include a 
poster session entitled 
"Facilitation of 

International Business 
through State 

Governmental Policy" by 
Schaeffer; a general session 
called "The Impact of 



Honors Programs on 
Undergraduate Academic 
Performance, Retention and 
Graduation" from John 
Cosgrove, Director of 
Institutional Research; a 
session devoted to profes- 
sional etiquette from Jeff 
Gauger, Food Services 
Director of Chartwell's; and 
a faculty performance con- 
cert by Register, titled 
"Songs from Chinese Poets." 
Additional CUP stu- 
dents and faculty members 



are an integral part of the 
conference. Students Joe 
Fiedor, Bryce Davis, 
Kenneth Bonus, Clay Nolan, 
Schaeffer and Wike all will 
serve as conference admin- 
istrators. Dr. Ralph Leary 
Barry McCauliff and David 
Lott will be session modera- 
tors. 

"If I have done my job, 
the conference will run like 
a well built machine. That 
is, the number one factor to 
judge effectiveness is if peo- 



ple have fun, learn and 
leave feeling they invested 
their time wisely," said 
Savage. 

Clarion's Honors 

Program is made of over 190 
students from across cam- 
pus. Fifty freshmen are 
admitted each year. 

"I am really excited to go 
to the NCHC Denver confer- 
ence and get Clarion's name 
out there. Our university 
should be very proud," said 
Wike. 



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The Cknon Call provides a synopsis of all crim 
inal investigations as conducted by Clarion 
University Public Safety for the month of| 
October 2007. All infonnation can be accessed on 
the Public Safety Web page 

littp://www.clarion.edu/admin/public8afety/loca 
tion.shtml. 

■ Oct. 22, at 9:33 p.m., University police were dis- 
patched to Nair Hall for a report of criminal mischief. 
The officer found an elevator that was stuck because 
someone removed the stuffing from a stuff'ed animal 
and put it in the elevator. 

■ Oct. 20, at 12:52 a.m., an unknown actor threw eggs 
at a vehicle while it was driving into Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 19, at 1:02 a.m., Samuel Russell, 19, of Newark, 
DE, was issued a citation for underage consumption of 
alcohol and possession and disorderly conduct. 

■ Oct. 17, at 12:45 a.m., Stephen Andrusky, 19, of 
Mercer, Pa., was charged with criminal mischief, disor- 
derly conduct and a traffic violation on Sept. 27. 

■ Oct. 17, at 1:45 p.m., a report of theft of a watch and 
other small items from a dorm room in Nair Hall was 
given to University Police. 

Oct. 16, a student reported unknown actors entered 
his room at 3:45 p.m. and removed several items in 
Nair Hall. 

■ Oct. 15, at 12:30 p.m., Jerome Dussia, 20, of 
Ridgway, Pa., was cited for criminal mischief. Dussia 
attempted to remove a boot off of his vehicle. 







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'- Honesty, Integitty, Experience - 

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Page 3 



HE CLARION CAUL 



October 25. 2007 



Ifiiili 



When did we stop caring? 



Heather Dalby 

s_hldalby@clarion.edu 



I am a frequent reader 
of the C/aWo;i Call. 
Sometimes 1 laugh at the 
comedic articles and some- 
times I find myself question- 
ing what was said, but today 
after reading the Call it 
dawned on me, "Where are 
the articles about politics?" 
Politics, something we 
should all be interested in 
but sadly are not. 

In today's age, young 
America is more interested 
in the latest celebrity 
breakup, Britney Spears' 
failed comeback and subse- 
quent loss of custody of her 
children and the latest mini 
telephone that we can con- 
sistently lose. We sit 
around the lunch table and 
discuss who our friends are 
dating, weekend plans and 
which classes we hate the 
most. 

But 40 years ago things 
were much different, 70 
years ago women weren't 
even allowed in college and 
well over 100 years ago 
African Americans weren't 
even considered humans. 
Why do I bring this up? 
Because somewhere 

between then and now we 
have lost sight of what we 
never should have, the right 
to decide who runs our coun- 
try. 

It is the right of every 
American that is 18 and 
over to cast their vote to 
^etermine who will run the 
fountry for the next four 
years. But sadly young 
America is over it, so to 
speak. Women rarely vote 
anymore and the amount of 
college students that vote is 
in decline. Why? Why after 
so many years of fighting for 
these simple rights have we 
thrown them away? Forty 
years ago students were 
clamoring to their college 
squares to voice their opin- 
ions about the Vietnam War, 




they were willing to take 
bullets if it would get their 
voices heard. They knew 
the danger yet they 
remained because it meant 
so much. Women weren't 
allowed in the work place, 
they may have eventually 
went to college, that is they 
went to an all girls finishing 
school, but they rarely 
became successful in the 
workplace, it was merely a 
place to kill time before they 
eventually settled down, 
married and had children. 

They grew tired of that 
lifestyle and demanded to be 
treated like the opposite 
sex. Martin Luther King 
and Rosa Parks fought for 
what they believed in, that 
African Americans had just 
as many rights as everyone 
else. 

And here we sit, a 
nation of able-bodied young 
Americans who choose to let 
someone else do it and har- 
bor under the impression 
that they don't matter. We 
all matter. Our vote mat- 
ters. We have to become 
more interested in politics: 
we have to become interest- 
ed in current events becau^ 
soon there won't be someone 
else to vote for us. And th^ 
doesn't happen either: no 
one else votes for anyone 
except themselves. 

I sat in a classroom full 
of students ranging from 18 
years of age to 23 years of 
age, the teacher pulled out a 
stack of pictures of random 
celebrities. One by one the 
students yelled out the 
name of the current celebri- 
ty shown until she showed a 
picture of a politician and a 



hush tell over the crowd. No 
one knew who he was, 
except me, as 1 looked at my 
fellow students, whispering 
to one another questions of 
who he was I thought to 
myself, "When did we stop 
caring?" As the teacher 
stood there holding the 
paper I found myself giving 
her the answer, "Al Gore," 
And the student body collec- 
tively said to themselves, 
"Oh". 

When did we stop caring? 
When did it become unsuit- 
able to talk about politics in 
public, when did it become 
unsuitable to talk about pol- 
itics with our friends, our 
parents? 

I blame whoever said it 
was unsuitable for the 
decline in the polls, for the 
young Americans who aban- 
doned the voting boat. 
Young America needs to step 
up, to start becoming inter- 
ested again. Everyday that 
1 walk my campus I wonder 
where the students are who 
are against the war. I won- 
der what would happen if 
we staged an anti-war rally? 
What happened to the musi- 
cians who wrote amazing 
anti-war songs? Did they 
die with the past? If they 
did then why is that music 
so important today, why is it 
so beneficial? Music meant 
something at one point, the 
words held meaning and 
power. Something we're 
lacking today. 

For the first time in 
young America's generation 
we have an interesting line 
up of candidates. We could 
see the first African 
American or female in con- 



trol of the White House. 
Who knows, we could oven 
have a First Gentleman 
instead of a First Lady. For 
the first time there is a can- 
didate who is in extreme 
favor of granting the homo- 
sexuals all of the freedoms 
that everyone else has. Like 
the African Americans and 
females before it has to start 
somewhere. We also have 
candidates who are actually 
for pulling our men and 
women out of the war. 
Young America has the abil- 
ity to see this in their life- 
time but it can't happen 
unless we actually get out 
there and vote. The pri- 
mary election is only 
months away (April 22, 
2008). and the Presidential 
Election is a little more than 
a year away (November 4, 
2008), this is the time to 
start researching the candi- 
dates, to start watching the 
debates on television, to fig- 
ure out who you want to 
vote for. 

We need to take an 
active interest in politics, 
college is the time to start 
defining who we are and 
who we want to become. 
This is the time to start 
breaking away from our 
parents. My advice is sim- 
ple: forget the labels, forget 
liberal, conservative, inde- 
pendent. Start finding out 
which candidate is the best 
in your book. Figure out 
what you want in your life: 
health care, education, and 
taxes. This affects us all. 
Find the candidate that has 
the most of what you want, 
there are none that will 
have 100% but look for the 
ones that you like the most 
based on their politics, and 
once you find them, vote for 
them. 

It doesn't matter what 
party they are for, vote for 
them. Take advantage of 
what has been given to you 
on a silver platter. Our 
ancestors fought so hard for 
us, don't let them down. 




Dear Editor: 

Fear and exaggerated 
threats have been promot- 
ed by unscrupulous lead- 
ers in all fields to achieve 
power, win objectives and 
defeat opponents. 

George Bush constant- 
ly uses fearful warnings of 
imagined future dangers. 
He mentioned Al-Qaeda 95 
times in a July speech in 
Charleston, S.C. He insists 
that threatening terrorists 
and the agonies of 9/11 
endlessly color our 
thoughts. 

Subtle delusions put 
George W in the White 
House and "won" him a so- 
called re-election. Later 



blatant deceitful fears pro- 
duced Bush's "mushroom 
cloud" and repetitious 
claims that Saddam had 
weapons of mass destruc- 
tion. So too were false 
claims that he sought an 
atomic weapon and had 
contributed to the 9/11 hor- 
ror. It took all of these 
frightful lies to give Bush 
the blank check he twisted 
and distorted to "justify" 
his Iraqi war that is false- 
ly pictured as a "war on 
terror." 

Thus Bush and 
Cheney, chicken hawks 
who ducked Vietnam, pose 
as "courageous warriors" 
who wage their war of 
choice to send our children 
off to kill, suffer and die. 

Exaggerated fears 
have followed the war's 
needless beginning. Bush's 
fear mongering pattern 
continues, creating the 
very terrorist fright he 



claims to fight. Sadly it 
wins support for his 
aggressive ends from poor- 
ly informed citizens and 
the inflexible Republicans 
in Congress. 

We are told that leav- 
ing Iraq threatens us with 
terrorists. Bush repeatedly 
says "If we fail there the 
enemy will follow us here." 
Similar to much of what he 
said earlier about Iraq. So 
I guess we are fighting a 
full-scale war in Iran so we 
won't have to fight them 
here. Bush and his believ- 
ers apparently envision 
waves of Al-Qaeda planes 
flying over the Flats and 
bombing Hooters. 

That is fakery say 
intelligence experts, but it 
is the last big argument 
the Bush believers have for 
keeping troops in Iraq. 
Mike McConnell, Director 
of National Intelligence, 
says it is "unlikely that 



intelligence officials con- 
tend that the vast majority 
of fights in the Al-Qaeda 
group are Iraqi. "The 
Washington Spectator 
reported and the 

Washington Post con- 
firmed that the Iraqi 
branch "posed little danger 
to the security of the U.s. 
Homeland. Their hands 
are full battling the Shiite 
majority. They take no 
orders from bin Laden. 
Just because they want us 
out doesn't mean they plan 
to follow us here." Nor 
could they. 

Shameful exaggerated 
fears and lies gave us war, 
deaths, debt and world dis- 
approval. 

Sincerely, 

Kenneth F. Emerick 
retired librarian. Clarion 
University 



J 



Eiiirial, Mm (« llic Editor aDd Call od 1«u 



THE CLARION CALL 



270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 



Phone: 814-393-2380 
Web: clarion.edu/thecall 



Fax: 814-393-2557 
E-mail: call@clarion.edu 



Executive Board 
2007-2008 



Lindsay Grystar, 

EdItor-ln-Chief 

Co-Managing Editor 

Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Amy Kaylor, 

Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor 

Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Edito 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hlll-Wagner 
Adviser 



Staff 

New?; Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Jamie Richard 
Entertainment: Amy Powers, Amber Stockholm, Joey 
Pettine, John Buffone SBQEfeK Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield, Denise Simons FMhirM: Rob 
IVIiller, Gregg Bandzuh, Nina Watts Photography and 
SfflfihlSl Jenifer Poblete, Dominic DeAngelo, Adam Huff, 
Sean Montgomery, Stefanie Jula, Andy Lander, Oaria 
Kurnal. Jessica Lasher OffiUifltlfim Nate Laney, Eric Miller, 
Justin Hogue, Brian Picard, Craig Beary, Jessica Cornman 

Policies 

The Ciarwn Call is the student-run newspaper (rf Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and 
obscenity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the 
Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only trased 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
when scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 



■ Opiniorts expressed In this publication am 
those of the writer or speaker, and do not 
necessarily reflect the opinions of the news- 
paper staff, student body, Clarion University 
or the community. 



Corrections 



I The October 11 issue of Tlie Clarion Call contained an 
error in the advertisement for LaVieta Lerch on page 2. 
The ad should read "Assistant District Attorney - 
Venango and Jefferson Counties. We apologize for this 
error. 



mi CLARIOI 

is looking for new editors. 
Want to join the staff? 



The paid positions of 

- Managing Editor 

- Entertainment Editor 

- Photography Editor 

- Graphics Editor 
are opening for the 
spring semester 



Stop by our office at 270 Gemmell 
and fill out an application! 

The deadline for applications are Wednesday, 

Nov. 7. Interviews will take place on Monday, 

Nov 12 starting at 8 p.m. 



Pa p 4 



TIE CLARION CALL 



October 25. 2007 



Ftitms 

Halloween's history: old and new traditions 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond@clarion.edu 

Ghosts, goblins and 
goodies: it's that time of year 
again! Halloween is less 
than a week away and its 
time for Clarion to get in the 
spirit. 

Hsdloween history 

Halloween is the time of 
year that people come 
together in the pursuit of 
being scared. 

Halloween can be traced 
back 2,000 years to the 
Celtics' Samhain festival. 
They believed that on Oct. 
31, the ghosts of those who 
died returned to earth. They 
believed that the presence of 
these ghosts helped the 
Druids, their priests, predict 
the future. 

So the Celtic people 
gathered to burn crops and 
make animal sacrifices to 
commemorate the event. 
They wore costumes made of 
animal heads and skins. 

Today, Americans use 
the day to dress up as other 
people, creatures and 
things. Typically, the chil- 
dren dress up to solicit 
candy from their neighbors 
while adults dress up to 
attend parties or other 
haunted places. 

The trick-ortreating 
and dressing up as we know 
it today dates back hun- 
dreds of years. When the 
ghosts were thought to have 
'come out on Halloween, peo- 
ple wore masks when they 
lleft their homes so the 
ghosts didn't recognize 
them. They would leave 
bowls of food outside to 
make the ghosts happy and 



prevent them from trying to 
come in. 

Today, the idea is that 
families will avoid being the 
victims of "all-hallows eve" 
pranks if they give the chil- 
dren candy Americans now 
spend nearly $7 million on 
Halloween, making it the 
.second largest commercial 
holiday, after Christmas. 

Halloween in Clarion 

There are a number of 
activities going on across 
campus and in the sur- 
rounding area, including 
haunted houses, corn mazes 
and haunted hayrides. 

Cindy Welsh, a leader at 
a Haunted Barn in Corsica, 
said her favorite part of the 
experience is seeing "the 
screamers." 

One of the University's 
biggest activities is the 
annual "Ghost Experience." 
Now in its fourth year, 
the presentation is a bit dif- 
ferent this time around. 
Because of the cold weather 
in the past, the walking tour 
of campus has been ehmi- 
nated. Through speakers 
and multimedia, the cam- 
pus' ghost stories will be 
told in Hart Chapel. 

Dr. Todd Pfannestiel, a 
history professor and advi- 
sor of the History Club, is 
also in talks with paranor- 
mal investigators from 
Northwest Pennsylvania 
Hauntings. He hopes they 
will come and use their 
equipment in Hart Chapel 
prior to the event and pres- 
ent their findings to the 
audience. 

Over the course of two 
nights, the History Club, 
who sponsors the event, 
hopes to see a turn-out like 
they have in past years. 



"it would be grcal to 
sell-out both nights and 
have 900 people attend." 
said Pfannestiel. 

The ghost tours .-tartcil 
when the club was looking 
for something to do m 
October. They were shocked 
at the turnout the first 
(about 250 people), .second 
(400) and third (500) years. 
"It really has taken on a 
life of it's own," said 
Pfannestiel. 

He said that many com- 
munity members come to 
the event and students are 
often interested because it 
involves the residence halls 
they live in. 

The stories told at the 
event include paranormal 
experiences from across 
campus, including Hart 
Chapel, Becht Hall and 
Wilkinson Hall. 

Most of the stories have 
been collected over the years 
since the event started. 
Some came from students, 
alumni and staff when the 
club first decided to hold the 
event. Since then, many 
people have come to 
Pfannestiel to tell their sto- 
ries, either from experience 
or handed down through the 
generations. He said about 
one-third of the stories come 
from actual experiences. 

Once Pfannestiel or the 
club receives a story, they 
check the facts behind them. 
For example, if the story 
involves a fire, the club 
members check old records 
to verify that there was a 
fire at that time. 

"I say 'here's the facts,' 
from that point it's a leap of 
faith," said Pfannestiel. 

As for those who are 
skeptical of his stories, 
Pfannestiel said. "I am too." 




He encourages the audi- 
ence to not take it too seri- 
ously and come for the 
entertainment. 

"1 have to admit. I've 
heard stuff and seen stuff 



that makes me pause and 
think." he said. 

For those interested in 
finding out more about 
ghost stories from Clarion, 
Pfannestiel is interested in 



staitinj4 a group that inves- 
tigates the paranormal his- 
toiy and tales of the univer- 
sity and county. 



Delta Zeta holds mock accident to raise awareness 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarlon.edu 

The sounds of fire 
trucks and ambulances 
could be heard throughout 
the campus of Clarion yes- 
terday at noon as EMTs, 
state troopers and fire fight- 
ers raced to the scene of two 
mangled cars occupied by 
bloody passengers. It sounds 
like the beginning of a hor- 
rific car accident, but in 
actuality, it was Delta Zeta's 
mock car crash. 

The mock accident took 
place to support the 
National Collegiate Alcohol 
Awareness Week (NCAAW). 
The event also is part of 
Delta Zeta's own campaign, 
"I Have a Choice: Educate, 
Encourage and Inspire." All 
158 chapters of the sorority 
will be doing things this 
week to help raise aware- 
ness about drinking and 
driving, and the mock acci- 
dent was the Clarion chap- 
ter's way of contributing. 

This is the second year 
the event has taken place, 
and once again it was head- 
ed by Jamie Bero. Aasisiant 
Director of Campus Lite and 
a volunteer firefighter. 

"We were told that we 
had to do something for 
NCAAW at the National 
Delta Zeta meeting," said 
Bero, "so on the plane ride 
home from Arizona, we 
came up with the idea for a 
mock accident." 

The mock accident was 
put on by nine members of 
Delta Zeta, five firefighters, 



three student firefighters, 
two EMTs, three borough 
policemen, one public safety 
officer and one state trooper. 
"It took a lot of coopera- 
tion from everyone 
involved," said Bero, "Like if 
Clarion Hospital decided 
that they didn't want to be 
involved, we wouldn't have 
had EMTs or any of the 
makeup or medical sup- 
plies." 

The accident was set up 
to look as real as possible. 
Two wrecked cars were set 
up to look as though they 
crashed and the members of 
Delta Zeta were inside the 
cars, adorned with bloody 
makeup to add to the effect 
and make it look as though 
they were seriously injured. 
Then. EMTs and a fire truck 
pulled up and the rescuers 
went to work. 

The girls were given 
blankets and checked on by 
the EMTs as the firefighters 
used the Jaws of Life to pry 
the doors open to get the 
girls out of the car. They 
were then put on stretchers 
and 'put in the back of the 
ambulance. The roof of one 
car was actually pried off in 
order to help the girls get 
out who were stuck in the 
back. 

Terria Dotson, a senior 
elementary and early child- 
hood education major, was 
one of the Delta Zetas taken 
out on a stretcher. 

"Even though it was 
fake, it was still nerve rack- 
ing." said Dotson, "It really 
gives you a reality check of 
everything that could hap- 
pen to you." 

Then, the state troopers 



took the driver of one car 
aside and proceeded to give 
her a field sobriety test. 
First, they had her follow a 
pen with her eyes. Then, 
they had her walk in a 
straight line and finally 
they had her stand on one 
foot. When it was deter- 
mined she was drunk, she 
was cuffed and put into the 
back of a squad car. 

During the mock acci- 
dent, a state trooper walked 
around and explained the 
procedures that the firemen 
and EMTs were doing. He 
also gave some DUI facts 
about Pennsylvania, one of 
which was that over 40,000 
people were arrested last 
year for driving under the 
influence in Pa. 

"As long as I am here 
[we'll hold the mock acci- 
dent]," said Bero. 




Terry Hook, an EMT, comes to "rescue" members of Delta Zeta h their mock car accident. It was 
held as a part of their "I Have a Choice: Educate, Encourage and Inspire" and National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week. (The Clarion Call/courtesy of Jamie Bero) 



ADVISING INFORMANT 

Have questions about making the most of vour education at Clarion'.' We'll find 



answer,-.. 



How long do I have to withdraw from 



n i-hH-'' What (h.n'< this entail'.' 



You have until Oct. 26 (Friday) to withdraw from a class. To do this, you 
must fill out a Class Withdrawal form. You can nvi this from thi' Advisinu 
Office. Your advisor must sign it bctorc taking it to the Reiiistrars OIIkv. 

Here are some things to keep m mmd before withdrawing: 



■ You are only allowed five withdrawals while at Clarion. 

■ Be sure that your remaining credits will not affect your t-lioibilitv for finan- 
cial aid. insurance, athletics, scholarshii).-. ,ir. l^uallv ytiu haM- lu be full-time. 
which means having 12 credits. 

■ A class withdrawal will appear it> a -'W on voiu' trnnscript and will not affect 
vour GPA. 



Advi,sing Informant is a service ol Ciiui ii, I' 



• II iiinc ai 



mail the office stall' at advising'Kclanon.cdii. 




October 25. 2007 



THE CLARION CALL 



Pages 



Pumpkins get a painted 
Halloween makeover 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nawatts®clarion.edu 

Clarion Students got in 
the Halloween spirit by 
painting their own individ- 
ual pumpkins Oct. 22 in the 
Gemmell Multi- Purpose 
Room. 

At least 100 students 
showed up to the event, 
which lasted for 2 hours. 

During the event, people 
used their creativity td 
make their small pumpkin 
unique. With a variety of 
paint colors, people went to 
work to make their own cre- 
ation. Some made scary 
faces, while others made 
scenic cemeteries or haunt- 
ed houses. Most seemed 
happy that using pumpkins 
allowed them to wipe it 
clean and start over if they 
made a mistake. 

Leslie Moyer. a fresh- 
man, said "I wanted to have 
a pumpkin for my room so I 
decided to come. I really 
enjoy the crafts because I 
like to make things and it is 
a great way to socialize," she 
said. "Other students like 
the idea of painting pump- 
kins and it is a great decora- 
tion for Halloween. I like to 




ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 



Kristina Compton, a freshman criminal justice major paints a 
pumpkin at UAB's Craft Series. (The Clarion Call/ Jess Lasher) 

paint and I come to the craft been doing well among stu- 



series often for fun." 

The event is part of 
UAB monthly Craft Series, 
where students get to create 
simple projects, like jewelry 
and picture frames. 

The series was estab- 
lished two years ago by 
Esteban Brown, a senior 
musical theater major and 
the previous UAB Arts com- 
mittee chair. Its purpose is 
to entertain students on 
campus and create simple 
arts and crafts for fun. It's 



dents ever since. 

"It's been successful for 
the past few years. It gives 
people .something to deco- 
rate their dorms and apart- 
ments with," said Andrea 
Berger. the current UAB 
.Arts Committee chair. 

The craft series happens 
on .Mondays once a month 
and is free. In November, 
there will be an art show 
where students have a 
chance to submit their own 
artwork. 




Dear Dr. Eagle, 

My brother recently was in a serious acci- 
dent and needed blood. I've never given blood 
because I'd never really thought about it 
before. What's involved in this procedure? 

Signed, 

Blood Brother 




Philosophy Club enters 
a ''rebuilding year" 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbandzuh@clarion.edu 

This year, the 

Philosophy Club is in a 
"rebuilding year." The club 
is doing their best to 
regroup after losing their 
adviser of 11 years, Dr. Jean 
Ramsey and transitioning 
to a new president. Rumsey 
retired at the conclusion of 
the last academic year. 

The club has been 
around at Clarion 
University since the late 
1990s. There are about 20 
members involved with the 
club this year and they are 
hoping for more involve- 
ment so they can reach the 
end of their "growing 
phase." 

Members meet at least 
once a month outside of 



Founder's Hall on the front 
steps. They sit together and 
discuss aspects of philoso- 
phy, like philosophers 
(Plato, Aristotle. C.S. Lewis. 
etc.). modern day ethical 
issues, religious beliefs and 
the members' individual 
opinions. 

"We learn a lot from just 
talking to each other," said 
Ken Bonus, a sophomore 
business management 

major and president of the 
club. 

Students from all 
majors are invited to attend 
meetings. 

"The club is always open 
to new faces with new 
ideas," said Bonus. 

He encourages students 
to stop and listen to what 
the club is talking about if 
they walk by one of their 
meetings. They welcome 
others voicing their opin- 




ions, because they enjoy hs- 
tening to what other people 
have to talk about. The club 
prides itself on being able to 
talk freely with other people 
and they handle conflicts in 
a mature manner. It is a 
place for the students to 
start acting like philoso- 
phers. 

Currently the club is 
trying to schedule communi- 
ty .service and fundraising 
activities. They also are 
thinking about two possible 
trips. 



Dear Blood Brother, 



Often we don't recognize & need until it 
affects us on a personal level. Hopefully this 
information will answer some of your ques- 
tions and encourage you to become a regular 
donor. 

There is no substitute for human blood, it can not be manufactured and can only 
come from donors. Donating blood is completely safe and virtually painless. Although 
60 percent of the U.S. population meets the donor eligibility requirements, only 5 per- 
cent of those people give blood. Donations typically increase after disasters such as a 
hurricane or the 9/11 attacks. However, red blood cells must be used within 
42 days, so even if there is an increased awareness and occasional surge in donations, 
the shelf-life of this product is limited. During the summer months and winter hoh- 
days, there is typically a shortage of donations and thus supply is diminished. 

There is always a need for blood and supplies must be replenished constantly. 
Someone in the U.S. needs blood every two seconds, one out of seven people admitted 
to the hospital will need blood and 38,000 donations are needed every day. Blood is 
transfused to 4 million patients per year and can be broken down into several compo- 
nents. 

Transfusions of whole blood are used for newborns and open heart surgeries. Red 
blood cells replace blood lost from car accidents, trauma and anemia. Platelets pro- 
mote clotting and are used for patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer, trans- 
plants and sickle cell disease. Plasma aids those with clotting disorders and burn vic- 
tims. So, effectively, one donor's blood could be used for four different individuals! 
However, currently donations are not keeping pace with the demand needed for trans- 
fusions. 

While all eight blood types are needed, donors with type 0-negative are always in 
demand. As the "universal donor" (this type can be used by all people and is often used 
in emergencies before a patient's blood type is known), 0-negative makes up only 7 per- 
cent of the U.S. population. 

As part of the process to determine one's eligibility for donation, a mini-physical is 
performed (including temperature, blood pressure, pulse and red blood cell count 
level). After collection and before it is released for use by others, each unit of donated 
blood undergoes 13 tests to check for 11 infectious diseases. 

Blood cells develop in the bone marrow, seep into the blood in bones and onto the blood 
stream. The body replenishes the donated pint within two months. If a person begins 
donating blood when eligible at 17 and donates every 56 days until age 76, they will 
give 48 gallons of blood and potentially save 1,000 lives! 

Donators are comprised of 50 percent men and 50 percent women. And, interest- 
ingly, 94 percent of blood donors are registered voters. While you're enjoying winter 
break, consider doing something for others. Spend one hour of your month off donating 
blood. It will make you feel good and may help three other people. 

Dv. Eagle is written by Valerie Wonderling of the Keeling Health Center. For more informa- 
tion or to suggest a topic, e-mail her at s_vjwonderli@clarion.edu. 



One of the events is a 
trip to Cook Forest. They 
plan to rent a cabin so the 
members can get away and 
have some fun. 

The other is called 
"Treasures of Greece." Dr. 
Todd Lavin approached the 



group with an idea of a trip 
to Greece. If he gets enough 
students to go, he hopes to 
take a group to Athens for 
nine days to explore and 
learn. 

Lavin is joined by Dr. 
Jamie PhiUips as the 



group's advisers. The other 
officers include Elijah 
Daubenspek, treasurer, and 
Dave Durney, community 
service chair. 




■HI 



Page 4 



THE CLARION CALL 



October 25, 2007 



Feitms 



Halloween's history: old and new traditions 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_saclesmond(acl(,irion.edu 

Ghosts, goblins and 
goodies: it's that time of year 
again! Halloween is less 
than a week away and its 
time for Clarion to get in the 
spirit. 

Halloween history 

Halloween is the time of 
year that people come 
together in the pursuit of 
being scared. 

Halloween can be traced 
back 2,000 years to the 
Celtics" Samhain festival. 
They believed that on Oct. 
31. the ghosts of those who 
died returned to earth. They 
believed that the presence of 
these ghosts helped the 
Druids, their priests, predict 
the future. 

So the Celtic people 
gathered to burn crops and 
make animal sacrifices to 
commemorate the event. 
They wore costumes made of 
animal heads and skins. 

Today. Americans use 
the day to dress up as other 
people, creatures and 
things. IVpically. the chil- 
dren dress up to solicit 
candy from their neighbors 
while adults dress up to 
attend parties or other 
haunted places. 

The trick'or-treating 
and dressing up as we know 
it today dates back hun- 
dreds of years. When the 
ghosts were thought to have 
come out on Halloween, peo- 
ple wore masks when they 
jleft their homes so the 
ghosts didn't recognize 
them. They would leave 
bowls of food outside to 
make the ghosts happy and 



prevent them from tryuig to 
come in. 

Today, the idea is that 
families will avoid being the 
victims of "all-hallows eve" 
pranks if they give the chil- 
dren candy. Americans now 
spend nearly $7 million on 
Halloween, making it the 
second largest commercial 
holiday, after Christmas. 

Halloween in Clarion 

There are a number of 
activities going on across 
campus and in the sur- 
rounding area, including 
haunted houses, corn mazes 
and haunted hayrides. 

Cindy Welsh, a leader at 
a Haunted Barn in Corsica, 
said her favorite part of the 
experience is seeing "the 
screamers." 

One of the University's 
biggest activities is the 
ainuial "Chost Experience." 

Now in its fourth year, 
the presentation is a bit dif- 
ferent this time around. 
Because of the cold weather 
in the past, the walking tour 
of campus has been elimi- 
nated. Through speakers 
and multimedia, the cam- 
pus' ghost stories will be 
told in Hart Chapel. 

Dr. Todd Ffannestiel, a 
history professor and advi- 
.sor of the History Club, is 
also in talks with paranor- 
mal investigators from 
Northwest Pennsylvania 
Hauntings. He hopes they 
will come and use their 
equipment in Hart Chapel 
prior to the event and pres- 
ent their findings to the 
audience. 

Over the course of two 
nights, the History Club, 
who sponsors the event, 
hopes to see a turn-out like 
they have in past years. 



"It would be great to 
iell-out both nights and 
have 900 people attend." 
said Ffannestiel. 

The ghost tours started 
when the club was lodkuiu 
for something to do in 
October. They were shocked 
at the turnout the tirsi 
(about li")!) |)eopU'). siHonil 
(40U) and third (500) years, 

'it really has taken on a 
life of it's own," said 
Bi'aiuiestiel. 

He said that many c<uii 
munity membei's come in 
the event and students arc 
often interested because it 
involves the residence halU 
they live in. 

The stories told at the 
event include paranormal 
experiences from across 
campus, including Hart 
Chapel. Becht Hall and 
Wilkuison Hall. 

Most of the stories have 
been collected over the years 
since the event started. 
Some came from students, 
alumni and staff when the 
club first decided to hold the 
event. Since then. man\ 
people have come to 
Ffannestiel to tell their sto- 
ries, either from experience 
or handed down through the 
generations. He said al)out 
one-third of the stories come 
from actual expei-iences. 

Once Ffannestiel or the 
club receives a story. the>- 
check the facts behind them. 
For example, if the story 
involves a fire, the club 
members check old records 
to verify that there was a 
fire at that time. 

"1 sa> 'here's the facts." 
from that point it's a leap ol 
faith." said Ffannestiel. 

As for those who are 
skeptical of his stories. 
Ffannestiel said. "1 am too." 



M 



cweer 



Calencf 



enqar 




"Tt 



■^ 




lie eiii-()urai!es Uu- ciiiui 
ence to not take it t(j() seri" 
()usl\- and come for the 
entertainment. 

"1 have tn admit. \\v 



that lnakl'^ nie pause and 
think."" he said. 

For those interested in 
finding out more about 
ghost stories h'om Clai'ion. 



starling a group that inves- 
tigates the paranormal his- 
tory and tales of the univer- 
sit\- and countv. 



heard stufC nnd seen stuff Ffannestiel is interested in 



Delta Zeta holds mock accident to raise awareness 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 

The sounds of fire 
trucks and ambulances 
could be heard throughout 
the campus of Clarion yes- 
terday at noon as EMTs, 
state troopers and fire fight- 
ers raced to the scene of two 
mangled cars occupied by 
bloody passengers. It sounds 
like the beginning of a hor- 
rific car accident, but in 
actuality, it was Delta Zeta's 
mock car crash. 

The mock accident took 
place to support the 
National Collegiate Alcohol 
Awareness Week (NCMW). 

The event also is part of 
Delta Zeta's own campaign. 
"I Have a Choice^ Flducate. 
Encourage and Inspire."" All 
158 chapters of the sorority 
will be doing things this 
week to help raise aware- 
ness about drinking and 
driving, and the mock acci- 
dent was the Clarion chap- 
ter's way of contributing. 

This is the second year 
the event has taken place, 
and once again it was head- 
ed by Jamie Bero. A:5sisiant 
Director of Campus Life and 
a volunteer firefighter. 

"We were told tha* we 
had to do something for 
NCAAW at the National 
Delta Zeta meeting," said 
Bero, "so on the plane ride 
home from Arizona, we 
came up with the idea for a 
mock accident." 

The mock accident was 
put on by nine members of 
Delta Zeta. five firefighters. 



three student firefighters, 
two EMTs, three borough 
policemen, one jjublic safety 
officer and one state trooper. 

"It took a lot of coopera- 
tion from everyone 
involved."" said Bero, "[.,ike if 
Clarion Hospital decided 
that they didn"t want to be 
involved, we wouldn"t have 
had EMTs or any of the 
makeup or medical sup- 
plies." 

The accident was set up 
to look as real as possible. 
IVo wrecked cars were set 
up to look as though they 
crashed and the members of 
Delta Zeta were inside the 
cars, adorned with bloody 
makeup to add to the effect 
and make it look as though 
they were seriously injured. 
Then. EMTs and a fire truck 
l^ulled up and the rescuers 
went to work. 

The girls were given 
blankets and checked on by 
the EMTs as the fii'efighters 
used the Jaws of Life to pr\- 
the doors open to get the 
girls out of the car. They 
were then put on stretchers 
and 'put in the back of the 
ambulance. The roof of one 
car was actually pried off in 
order to help the girls get 
out who were stuck in the 
back. 

Terria Dotson, a .senior 
elementary and early child- 
hood education major, was 
one of the Delta Zetas taken 
out on a stretcher. 

"Even though it was 
fake, it was still nerve rack- 
ing." said Dotson, "It really 
gives you a reality check of 
everything that could hap- 
pen to you.'" 

Then, the state troopers 



took the driver of oni' car 
aside and proceeded to give 
her a field sobriety test. 
First, they had her follow a 
pen with her eyes. Then, 
they had her walk in a 
straight line and finally 
they had her stand on one 
foot. When it was deter- 
mined she was drunk, she 
was cuffetl and put into the 
back of a squad car. 

During the mock acci- 
dent, a state trooper walked 
around and explained the 
procedures that the fii'emen 
and EMTs were doing. He 
al.so gave some DUl facts 
about Fennsylvania. one of 
which was that over 40,000 
people were arrested last 
year for driving under the 
influence in Fa. 

"As long as 1 am here 
[we'll hold the mock acci- 
dent]." said Bero. 




Terry Hook, an EMT. comes to "rescue" members of Delta Zeta in their mock car accident. It was 
held as a part of their "I Have a Choice: Educate. Encourage and Inspire" and National Collegiate 
Alcohol Awareness Week. (The Clarion Call/courtesy of Jamie Bero) 



ADVISING INFORMANT 



Have questions about making the iih<-. -., >our educiinm ai Clarion'.' Wf 11 t 

answers! 

xlow long do I have to withdraw from a class'.' What does this entail? 

You have until Oct. 26 (Friday) to withdraw fi'om a class. To do this, you 
must fill out a Class Withdrawal furm. You can get this from the .Advising 
Office. Y(mr advisor must sign it before taking it to the Registrar's Office. 

Here are some things to keep in nimd l)efore withdrawing: 

■ You are only allowed five withdrawals while at Clarion. 

■ Be sure that your remaining credits will not affect your (.'ligil)ility for finan 
cial aid. insurance, athletics, scholarships, etc. Usually you have to be full-time, 
whit'h means having 12 credits. 

■ A class withdrawal will appear as a "W" on your transscript and will not affi 
your GFA. 

Advising Informant is a service of Clai'ion Univt-rsity".-; Advisiing Office. If you have any questimir- vmi wmiK 

mail the office .staff at advising'M'liU'ion.t'du. 




October 25, 2007 



THE CLARION CALL 



Pumpkins get a painted 
Hailoween malceover 



Pages 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

n,)watts®claf ion.edu 

Clarion Sludeiils got in 
the Halloween spirit In 
painting their own indi\iii 
ual pumi)kins Oct. 22 in the 
Cieminell .VIultiFurpose 
Hoom, 

At least 100 students 
showed up to the event, 
which lasted for 2 hours. 

During the event, people 
used their creativity to 
make their small pumpkin 
unique. With a variety of 
paint colors, people went to 
work to make their own cre- 
ation. Some made scary 
faces, while others made 
scenic cemeteries or haunt- 
ed houses. Most seemed 
happy that using pumpkins 
allowed them to wipe it 
clean and start over if they 
made a mistake. 

Leslie Moyer, a fresh- 
man, said "I wanted to have 
a pumpkin for my room so I 
decided to come. I really 
enjoy the crafts because I 
like to make things and it is 
a great way to socialize," she 
said. "Other students like 
the idea of painting pump- 
kins and it is a great decora- 
tion for Halloween. I like to 




Kristina Campion, a freshman criminal justice major paints a 
pumpkin at UAB's Craft Series. (The Clarion Ca///Jess Lasher) 

paint and 1 come to the craft been doing well among stir 
series often for fun. " 

The event is part of 
UAB monthly Craft Series, 
where students get to create 
simple projects, like jewelry 
and picture fi'ames. 

The series was estab- 



dents ever since. 

"It's been successful for 
the past few years. It gives 
p('o|)le something to deco- 
rate their dorms and apart- 
ments with," said .Andrea 
Berger. the current IJ.AB 



lished two years ago by Arts Committee chair. 
Esteban Ih-own, a scmor 
musical theater major and 
the previous L>.\B .Arts com- 
mittee chair. Its pur|)ose is 
to entertain studcMits on 
campus and create sim])le 
arts and crafts for fun. It's 



The craft series happens 
on Mondays once a montlt 
and is free. In November, 
there will be an art show 
where students ha\e a 
chance to submit their own 
artwork. 



Philosophy Club enters 
a "rebuilding year" 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s.gsbandzuhSclarion.edu 

This year, the 

Fhilosophy Club is in a 
"rebuilding year." The club 
is doing their best to 
regroup after losing their 
adviser of 1 1 years. Dr. Jean 
Rumsey. and transitioning 
to a new president. Rumsey 
retired at the conclusion of 
the last aciuU'mic year. 

The club has been 
around at Clarion 

University since the late 
]99()s. There are about 20 
members involved with the 
club this year and they are 
hoping for more involve- 
ment so they can reach the 
end of tlu'ir "growing 
phase," 

Members mi'et at least 
once a month outside of 



Founder's Hall on the front 
steps. They sit together ;ind 
discuss aspects of philoso- 
phy, like philosophers 
(f^lato. .Aristotle, C.S, Lewis. 
etc.). modern day ethical 
issues, religious beliefs and 
tile mombers' individual 
opinions. 

"We learn a lot fi'om just 
talking to each other," said 
Ken l)oiiii>. a sophomore 
business management 

major and president of the 
club. 

Stiuieiu.- from all 
majors are invited to attend 
meetings. 

"The club is always open 
to new faces with new 
ideas," said Bonus, 

He encourages students 
to stop and listen to what 
the club is talking about if 
they walk by (nte of their 
meetings, fhey welcome 
others voicing their o|)in- 



Organization 
Spotlight 



ions, becau.se they enjoy lis- 
tening to what other people 
have to talk about. The club 
prides itself on being able to 
talk freely with other people 
and they handle confiicts in 
a mature manner. It is a 
place for the students to 
start acting like philoso- 
phers. 

Currently the club is 
trying to schedule communi- 
ty service and fundraising 
activities. They also are 
thinking about two possible 
trips. 




u 



Andy Close, Junior 

Mass Media Arts, Journalism and 
Communication Studies 

"My landlord Pearl." 



Chad Micosky, Freshman 
Information Systems 

"Big, hairy spiders." 




Tim Michaels, junior 
Speech Communication 

■,My biggest fear is that one day I will come to 

realize that all I believe to exist is, in fact, just 

an illusion, and nothing I have experienced or 

done has meant diiything. Add needles." 

TT 



ASK DOCTOR EAGLE 




Dear Dr. Eagle, 

My brother recently was in a serious acci- 
dent and needed blood, I've never given blood 
because I'd never really thought about it 
before. What's involved in this procedure'.' 

Signed, 

Blood Brother 



Dear Blood Brother. 

Often we don't recognize a need until it 
affects us on a personal level. Hopefully this 
information will answer some of your ques- 
tions and encourage you to become a regular 
donor. 

There is no substitute for human blood, it can not be manufactured and can only 
come from donors. Donating blood is completely safe and virtually painless. Although 
(it) percent of the U.S. population meets the donor eligibility requirements, only 5 per- 
cent of those people give blood. Donations typically increase after disasters such as a 
hurricane or the 9/11 attacks. However, red blood cells must be used within 
42 days, so even if there is an increased awareness and occasional surge in donations, 
the shelf-life of this product is limited. During the summer months and winter holi- 
days, there is typically a shortage of donations and thus supply is diminished. 

There is always a need for blood and supplies must be replenished constantly. 
Someone in the U,S, needs blood every two seconds, one out of seven people admitted 
to the hospital will need blood and 38,000 donations are needed every day. Blood is 
transfused to 4 million patients per year and can be broken down into several compo- 
nents. 

Ti'ansfusions of whole blood are used for newborns and open heart surgeries. Red 
blood cells replace blood lost from car accidents, trauma and anemia. Platelets pro- 
mote clotting and are used for patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer, trans- 
plants and sickle cell disease. Plasma aids those with clotting disorders and burn vic- 
tims. So, effectively, one donor's blood could be used for four different individuals! 
However, currently donations are not keeping pace with the demand needed for trans- 
fusions. 

While all eight blood types are needed, donors with type Q-negative are always in 
demand. As the "universal donor" (this type can be used by all people and is often used 
in emergencies before a patient's blood type is known), 0-negative makes up only 7 per- 
cent of the U.S. population. 

As part of the process to determine one's eligibility for donation, a mini-physical is 
performed (including temperature, blood pressure, pulse and red blood cell count 
level). After collection and before it is released for use by others, each unit of donated 
blood undergoes 13 tests to check for 11 infectious diseases. 

Blood cells develop in the bone marrow, seep into the blood in bones and onto the blood 
stream. The body replenishes the donated pint within two months. If a person begins 
donating blood when eligible at 17 and donates every 56 days until age 7(3, they will 
give 48 gallons of blood and potentially save 1,000 lives! 

Donators are comprised of 50 percent men and 50 percent women. And, interest- 
ingly, 94 percent of blood donors are registered voters. While you're enjoying winter 
break, consider doing something for others. Spend one hour of your month off donating 
blood. It will make you feel good and may help three other people. 

Dr. E.i^'/e is written by Valerie Wonderlin^ of the Keeling Health Center. For more informa- 
tion or to suggest a topic, e-mail her at s_vjwonderU(i' cIarion.edu. 



One of the events is a 
trip to Cook Forest, They 
l)lan to rent a cabin so the 
members can get away and 
have some fun. 

The other is called 
"Treasures of Greece." Dr. 



group with an idea of a trip 
to Co'eece. If he gets enough 
students to go, he hopes to 
take a group to Athens for 
nine days to explore and 
learn. 

Lavin is joined by Dr. 



group's advisers. The other 
officers include Elijah 
Daubenspek, treasurer, and 
Dave Durney, community 
service chair. 



Todd Lavin approached the Jamie Phillips as the 




^\x m von 

by Sean Montgomery 



Colleen Reilly, Junior 
Elementary Education 

"Ketchup!" 






<^ 



Luke Bobnar, Sophomore 
Biology 

"David Lo Pan from 'Big Trouble in Little 
China' starring Kurt Russell." 



7. 



-ifMi^m 






Pa g e 6 



Tlffi CLARIOir CALL 



October 25, 2007 



StMimnt 

Second annual Hip-Hop Symposium attracts over 800 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers®clarion edu 



The 2nd Annual Hip- 
Hop Symposium took place 
on Oct. 18 in both the 
Gemmell Multi- Purpose 
Room and Marwick-Fioyd 
Auditorium. 

Hip- Hop: Roots. 

Relevance, Reaction was an 
all day event that was free 
and open to all students and 
the public. 

This years symposium 
had more than 800 atten- 



dees that were given tht 
back story of hip-hop. 

■'They were able to visu- 
ally see and hear different 
perspectives of hip-hop cul- 
ture from artists, producers, 
corporate owners and from 
young people who like hip- 
hop." said Dr. Joanne 
Washington, mass media 
arts, journalism and com- 
munication studies profes- 
sor and one of the organiz- 
ers of the event. 

The day's events began 
with students' poetry read- 
ings and a showing of the 
documentary "HipHop: 



Beyond Beats and Rhymes" 
from 9:30 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. 
This documentary, by Byron 
Hurt, focuses on exploring 
representations of gender 
roles in hip-hop and rap 
music. 

Hurt, a former college 
football player and a long- 
time gender violence pre- 
vention educator, takes a 
look at the masculinity of 
males and the demeaning 
images of women present in 
hip-hop music today in the 
documentary. 

The next session of the 
day was a forum moderated 




Brian Cook (left) and Yolanda "Yo-Yo" Wtiitaker took place in the keynote event of the Hip-Hop 
Symposium at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 18. The last forum that the two were featured in discussed how 
genders are represented and the portrayal of violence in hip-hop. (The Clarion Call/Jen Poblete) 



by T. Denean Sharpley- 
Whiting at 12:30 p.m. 
Sharpley- Whiting is a pro- 
fessor of African-American 
and Diaspora Studies and 
French at Vanderbilt 
University. She is also the 
author of the book "Pimps 
Up, Ho's Down: Hip-Hop's 
Hold on Young Black 
Women," which also 
addresses gender roles in 
hip-hop music. The forum 
was led by student panehsts 
Tracey Milchick, Paulete 
Ibeka and Amil Cook. 

Following the forum 
was another showing of the 
documentary, "Hip-Hop: 
Beyond Beats and Rhymes" 
from 2 p.m. to 3: 15 p.m. A 
Slam Poetry Workshop was 
then held from 3:30 p.m. to 
4:30 p.m. 

The keynote event of the 
symposium was the final 
session that began at 7:30 
p.m. It was a forum featur- 
ing Brian Cook and Yolanda 
"Yo-Yo" Whitaker. 

Cook is a Clarion 
University graduate and is 
currently a national news 
and sports reporter for the 
American Urban Radio 
Networks. 

Whitaker is a Grammy 
nominated artist and is con- 
sidered to be one of the first 
female rappers. 




From L to R: I Denean Sharpley- Whiting moderates the student 
panelists Amil Cook, Paulette Ibeka and Tracey Milchick for the 
image reality check discussion. (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



The forum again focused 
on how genders are repre- 
sented and the portrayal of 
violence in hip-hop music. 
Whitaker also discussed the 
affect hip-hop artists have 
on their audiences. 

Events that took place 
throughout the day included 
a Juried Art Exhibit on the 
first floor of Marwick-Boyd 
as well as a book signing, 
sales and live WCUC radio 
broadcast in Gemmell. 

This year's symposium 
gave students the opporuni- 
ty to take a deeper look into 
the roots of hip-hop and its 
affect of audiences in a more 
interactive format. 

"It was informative and 



entertaining," said junior 
Amy Blank. 

The symposium also 
provided students with an 
opportunity to get more 
involved and gain universi- 
ty co-curricular credit by 
volunteering to help with 
the events. 

Student volunteer Nina 
Gaitaniella said, "It was a 
good opportunity to get 
involved with the university 
and I also learned a lot of 
things about hip-hop cul- 
ture that I did not know 
before." 

A break-out discussion 
session took place on Oct. 22 
at 7 p.m. to wrap-up this 
year's .symposium. 



Open Mic N ight held in Gemmeii Newlv single liead of statp 

John Buffone Bluegras^s and Folk style to Cramer's style was more "^^"■J ^illgl^ IIVCIU Ul atCltC 

ioolcing for good woman 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_jdbuffone@clarion,edu 

Walking into a packed 
Gemmell Ritazza area 
Tuesday night at 8 p.m.. it 
was obviously Open Mic 
Night. 

Open Mic Night is 
where students express 
themselves and show off 
their talents in front of a 
group of enthusiastic sup- 
porters. 

Each artist gets 15 min- 
utes to perform whatever 
they like to a large group of 
on-lookers. The night con- 
sisted of many different gen- 
res, styles and interests that 
kept the event fresh. 

The evening started off 
with Eric Nebel's fervent 
singing along with an album 
by Disturbed and was fol- 
lowed by the well harmoniz- 
ing trio, Derv. 

The night took a lot of 
different turns as time went 
on. From Fred Theiss's 



Bluegrass and Folk style to 
the laid-back and self 
assured acoustic manner of 
Spencer Marshall, Open Mic 
Night had it all. 

Poppy and crowd involv- 
ing band. Misleading 
Manderson lead by talented 
guitarist. Mike Anderson, 
pleased the audience with 
favorites such as "What's 
My Age Again?" by Blink 
182 and "My Own Worst 
Enemy" by Lit. Devin 
Burda's performed his own 
version of Usher's "You 
Remind Me." Burda showed 
exceptional stage presence 
which complimented his on- 
the-mark vocals. 

The night wasn't all 
musical talent though. Two 
poets took the stage to 
express themselves through 
written words. The very 
open and sometimes graphic 
Ylynne Baskervie read her 
poems with passion and con- 
fidence before a very tuned 
in audience. Mason Cramer 
also read poetry later on in 
the night. 



Cramer's style was more 
humorous but was still pre 
sented in a well-prepared 
and professional manner. 
Cramer also promoted his 
newly put together poetry 
book that he's selling for 
"whatever the consumer 
thinks it's worth." Both 
poets did a very good job at 
delivering their material 
and were clearly a hit with 
the spectators. 

Overall, Open Mic Night 
was a most enjoyable time 
where students come 
together to show off their 
abilities. 

With a very comfortable 
and friendly atmosphere, 
everyone should be a part of 
Open Mic Night at least 
once in their college career. 
Even if you aren't perform- 
ing, just check out the local 
talent and appreciate all the 
gifted entertainers that 
Clarion University has to 
offer. 



Elisabeth Donate 
Department of Modern 
Languages & Cultures 



"The Roclcy Horror Picture Show" 




Dr. Frankenfurter (Jonathan Sherbine) struts his stuff for Brad (Dominic DeAngelo) and Janet 
(Tara Haupt) for the shadow casting of -The Rocky Horror Picture Show" Tuesday night in the 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. (The Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



Unless you have been 
living in a cave for the past 
week or so (and I am aware 
that most college students 
sort of do), you must know 
by now that French 
President Nicolas Sarkozy 
and his wife Cecilia have hit 
"Splitsville," and officially 
announced their divorce this 
on Oct. 18. This is some- 
thing that has not happened 
to a French head of state 
since Napoleon had canned 
the barren Josephine for the 
fertile Marie-Louise back in 
1809. 

That marriage had been 
a sham for quite a while, 
and I don't even know why 
Sarko and Cecilia even 
bothered to "reconcile" 
about a year ago. As you 
may or may not know, 
Cecilia had left Sarko for 
another man (Richard 
Attias, the Director of 
Publicis Events) from about 
May to the end of December 
2005. During the same peri- 
od, Sarko had allegedly had 
a relationship with Anne 
Fulda, a journalist for the 
right wing French daily, Le 
Figaro. According to an arti- 
cle published in Le Monde 
on Oct. 19, while he was 
desperately trying to woo 
his wife back to him, he was 
also commissioning opinion 
polls to find out if a divorced 
pohtician could be elected 
president (his presidential 
campaign was in full swing 
at the time). 

In an "exclusive" inter- 
view published by the 
French daily L'Est 
Republicain on Oct. 19, 
Cecilia claims that she had 
returned to her husband to 
try to rebuild something and 
that, as a couple, she and 
Sarko had tried to get over 
their marital crisis, but had 



not succeeded to do so 

Ceciha also claimed 
repeatedly (and still does) 
that she did not want to live 
in the public eye. In a May 
5, 2005 interview for the 
French Magazine Tele Star, 
she had said: "I do not see 
myself as a 'first lady' That 
role bores me. I am not polit- 
ically correct. I go around in 
jeans, camouflage pants, or 
cowboy boots. I do not fit the 
mold." 

Those remarks about 
her thorough dislike of 
being in the public eye and 
on divorcing her husband 
because she wants to live "in 
the shade," away from the 
spotlight, seems to be in 
contradiction with the enor- 
mous amount of media 
attention that this woman 
had managed to muster over 
the past year or so, and with 
her quasi pathological need 
to hobnob among the rich 
and famous. To quote Le 
Monde ("Nicolas Sarkozy, a 
I'Elysee sans Cecilia" 
["Nicolas Sarkozy, at the 
Elysee Palace without 
Ceciha"], 10/19/07): 

"She has, however, 
given, for a long time, this 
image of herself as one of 
those modern courtisans, 
living her life in the foot- 
path of very different men 
who had in common that 
they were always rich and 
always in the limelight." 

Heck, we cannot forget 
either that, back in 1984. 
she had married "the most 
famous man in France" - 
the comedian and TV per- 
sonality Jacques Martin, 
who passed away just a few 
weeks ago at the age of 74 
(he was considerably older 
than she was when they 
were married - she will turn 
50 on Nov. 12.) They had 
actually been married by 
Sarko himself, who was 
then mayor of Neuilly-sur- 
Seine. an affluent suburb of 
Paris. It is supposedly then 
that he had fallen madlv in 



love with Cecilia, and they 
were an item less than five 
short years later (they never 
married until Sarko's 
divorce from his first wife 
was finahzed, in 1996.) 

Do the French care 
about the demise of Sarko 
and Cecilia's marriage? I am 
not sure, but I would say 
that they probably don't ■ 
except for the momentary, 
and somewhat sadistic 
pleasure that they may 
derive from reading the 
inevitable juicy gossip 
columns published on their 
President's divorce in 
France's best tabloids, or the 
more heady analyses of the 
failure of the Sarkozys' very 
public marriage in more 
high brow publications like 
Le Monde or Le Nouvel 
Observateur. 

However, the fact that 
Sarko and Cecilia's divorce 
was announced at a time 
when France was being 
rocked by another wave of 
strikes and social unrest did 
not fail to be noticed by 
some. Annick Lepetit, the 
Socialist Party's national 
secretary, said in a commu- 
nique: 

"When rumors about the 
separation of Cecilia and 
Nicolas Sarkozy have been 
flying for the past six days, 
the Elysee Palace has cho- 
sen this Thursday, a day of 
strong social mobilization, 
to make the information 
official. We will leave it to 
the French people to judge if 
it's only a simple coinci- 
dence." 

I can only wish the best 
to both Sarko and Cecilia in 
their future private lives. I 
still don't care for him. 
though, and I keep on won- 
dering how any woman 
could ever be attracted to 
that man - a megalomaniac 
who is about as good-looking 
as a bulldog 

(Donato is a native of 
Lille, in northern France.) 



October 25, 2007 



T!ffi CLASIOJN GilLL 



Page? 



"Across the Universe" was 
both exceptional and weird 



Ainbei Slockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s alstcK khol#clarinn.e<Ju 




"Across the Universe" 
Columbia Pictures 
Rating; 3/5 



ifr!|n$r 



"Across the Universe" is 
a musical portrayal of the 
19()0s era. It entwines a love 
story and a revolution, all 
explained by popular 
Heath's' songs that defined 
that time. It's a powerful, 
emotional, musical that v ill 
captivate and astound view- 
ers. 

.Judc {-lim Sturgess) is a 
dock worker in Liverpool. 
Kngland. who punches the 
clock everyday wondering 
aboui his estranged father 
who lives in America. 
Eventually, he decides to 
embark on a journey to find 
his lather, and takes off for 
the I'mtcd States, with 
nothiiig. 

lie arrives in 

Connei'ticut only to find out 
his father never knew about 
him. :ind certainly didn't 
I' ; .< any interest in ever 
knowiiir him. With no 



his lite. fJude runs into free- 
spirit Max (Joe Anderson), 
and they immediately 
become inseparable. 

Max and Jude decide 
Connecticut isn't the place 
for their brilliant young 
minds, arid take off for New 
York City, the Big Apple, 
with no specific plans in 
mind. Luckily, they stumble 
into landlady Sadie (Dana 
Fuchis) who is just as free 
spirited as they are, and 
agrees to let them rent an 
apartment from her This is 
the beginning of the two 
boys developing a unique 
family, as strangers from 
random places Prudence 
(T.V Carpi vo) and JoJo 
(Martin Luther) wander in, 
and join them in their jour- 
ney through the early 60s. 

Lucy (Evan Rachael 
Wood) is the lady of the 
story, she is Max's sister and 
comes to New York to join 
her brother, as she mourns 
the death of her high school 
sweetheart who died in the 
Vietnam chaos. She quickly 
falls in love with Jude and 
joins the gang, as they all 
enjoy being young, restless, 
in love and having New York 
City in the palm of their 
hands. For awhile life was 
beautiful, there was no 
responsibility, no specific 
plan of action, and no one to 
answer to. 

The story completely 
changes as the gang is split 
up, Max is drafted into the 
war, Lucy joins the anti-war 
activists and Jude becomes 
a miserable hermit. Each of 
the characters begin to go 
into their own different 




grow into completely differ- 
ent people, and change with 
the times. 

I'm giving this movie 3 
leaves. The beginning and 
ending were exceptional, 
enabling audience members 
to get a powerful feel of 
what the 60s were like, and 
what it meant for everyone. 
Towards the middle of the 
movie things seemed to 
become somewhat weird 
and twisted at times, there 
were some parts that just 
were completely random 
and confusing. 

As characters become 
involved in the drug related 
part of the 60s, the scenes in 
the movie become more and 
more strange. There are a 
lot of vibrant colors, distort 
ed images and weird events. 
I wasn't quite sure what 
they stood for or why they 
were included. It took away 
from the overall purpose of 
the movie for a good portion 
of the movie, which is why I 
rated this film a little lower. 
I would definitely sug- 
gest renting it when it 
comes out, that way you can 
see the great parts, and 
maybe skip over the 
stranger ones. 



wliere to go at this point in directions, forcing them to 

Paramore is my new obsession 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s.sedent@clarion.edu 




"Riot!" 
Paramore 
Rating: 5/5 



The name Paramore has 
I)een throw !i ;u'()und in my 
life for the past couple of 
weeks hy numerous friends 
1)1" mine. It wasn't until 
I'ecentjv that 1 actually sat 
down and i^'ave the band a 
chance, and hoy am I glad 
that I did. 

Yhis past weekend, my 
hoylViend uploaded a couple 
new allunns onto my iPod 
ndcuihnu' SInny Toy Guns. 
The Ro(l<ei .Summer and 
last hut cerfanily not least, 
Pai'ainoi'e, 

1 think 1 must have a 
prohleni with these hands 
thiit 'liavi' uirls as .singers. 
Ala.\ lie il - hectiii.se I ran 
rehtle mot) tii the lyrics 
hecau;-.!' ilie\- ai'e written for 
woiiKMi to siiiii a^ opposed to 
sinii; ahont women. 

I will first and foremost 
^ddre^^ niv new favorite 
snnij "Misery Husiness." Yes. 
1 r< ai;/e I nat this is the new 
radii' hit and what not. but I 
(liHii i aie. There are a few 
liiH- tliat made me fall 



mail 



!v in love with this .song. 
"Seduul rliances they 
don't people never 

ehanir , -;„ . a whore you're 
noiliin;^ more, I'm sorry 
thai II |i' , . I I hantie." 



Those two lines are pret- 
ty much the only reason as 
to why I fell in love with 
Paramore. They are just so 
brutally honest. Overall, the 
song is about how she had a 
thing for this guy and a girl 
took him away from her. 
Then the girl broke up with 
him and she got him back. 

Lead vocalist Hayley 
Williams wrote this about a 
friend she knew that she felt 
was being manipulated by a 
girl. 

Yet another great line 
that she uses: "I watched his 
wildest dreams come true/ 
Not one of them involving 
you." Th&t part made me 
laugh out loud, although not 
as hard as the first one. 

I'll be honest, it's not the 
most creative storylihe for a 
song, but the way that she 
handles it makes it great. 

Another Bong that I am 
a big fan of it "For a 
Pessimist, I'm Pretty 
Optimistic." 

It's basically a relation- 
ship gone bad song. 

"Why don't you stand 
up, be a man about it?/ 
Fight with your bare hands 
about it now." 

Since I have informed 
you of a few songs, I thought 
I should tell you a little 
more about the band. 
Paramore formed in 
Franklin, Tenn. and consists 
of Williams, lead guitar and 
backing vocalist Josh Farro, 
bass guitarist Jeremy 
Davis, Zac Farro on drums 
and Taylor York on rhythm 
guitar for their tour York 
replaced Hunter Lamb, who 
left the band earlier this 
year to get married. 

"Riot!" was released on 
June 12, then "Misery 
Business" was released as 
the first single on June 2L 

Just recently on Oct. 11, 
"crushcrushcrush" was 
released as Paramore's sec- 
ond song off of "Riot!" 

With lines like, "Cause 
I'd rather waste my life pre- 




tending/ Then have to forget 
you for one whole minute," 
"crushcrushcrush" was a 
great choice as a second 
release. Not to mention the 
chorus, which is probably 
the most catchy part of the 
entire song. 

"Nothing compares to a 
quiet evening alone/ Just 
the one, two I was just 
counting on/ That never 
happens/ 1 guess I'm dream- 
ing again/ Let's be more 
than this." 

All in all, I think that 
Paramore's unique sound is 
what is making them such a 
hit in the U.S. I think that 
Williams' voice is mesmeriz- 
ing. It's one of those voices 
that you never get sick of. 
Her melody is so perfect for 
the type of music that she 
sings. 

Other good songs 
include "Hallelujah," "We 
Are Broken" and "Let the 
Flames Begin." Actually, 
every song on the entire 
album is amazing and I can 
listen to it over and over 
again without thinking 
twice about it. I can't really 
say one song is better than 
the other, with the exception 
of "Misery Business" 
because I just think that it 
is one of greatest songs I 
have heard this month. 

Don't worry, next month 
I will have a whole new 
obsession. I recommend 
Paramore to everyone. I also 
recommend the two bands I 
listed earlier in the article^ 
Shiny Toy Guns and The 
Rocket Summer 



A career se strong It survived ''Catwoman" 



Gina Piccalo 

Los Angeles Times 

Halle Berry breezed into 
the hotel restaurant beam- 
ing, her hair long and loose, 
her pregnant belly barely 
hidden under a snug black 
jersey dress, her glamour 
muted but still compelling 
enough to hush the jaded 
Four Seasons crowd and 
befuddle the waiter 

She joked easily, but a 
bit self-consciously, about 
her pregnancy weight and 
her abundant bosom and 
wondered aloud how hard it 
would be as a diabetic and 
at 41 to regain her famous 
figure after the baby. In that 
instant. Berry was just 
another anxious, first-time 
mom-to-be. But that candor 
gracefully gave way to the 
comfortable self-possession 
of one of Hollywood's high- 
est-paid actors, reportedly 
earning $14 million per pic- 
ture. On this Monday morn- 
ing, the eve of the L.A. pre- 
miere of her new film 
"Things We Lost in the 
Fire," Berry wasn't keen on 
girl talk. 

She was, however, eager 
to defend the detour into 
commercial and critical dis- 
appointments her career 
took after she earned an 
Oscar in 2002 for "Monster's 
Ball," from the horror film 
"Gothika" to her turn as 
"Catwoman." It was all part 
of her strategic plan, she 
said. 

"After 'Monster's Ball,' I 
really wanted to go in a dif- 
ferent direction," said Berry, 
her expression open and 
accessible. "Sometimes 
those things work really 
well. Sometimes they don't. 
But as a person, and as an 
actor, it worked well for me. 
I tried new things. I took 
risks. I faced certain fears. 
You don't win big by just 
making mediocre choices." 

Berry said she still bat- 
tles anxiety the day a film 
opens though. Usually, she 
said, she knocks back a cou- 
ple of cocktails to take the 
edge off the box-office antic- 
ipation - a crutch she obvi- 
ously c^n't employ while 
pregnant. The reality check 
doesn't come until two 
weeks later, she said, when 
she makes a point of walk- 
ing the streets to see what 
regular folks have to say 
about her film. 

"You have no real way of 



knowing until you go out in 
the world," she said. "People 
have the feeling that they 
can tell nu' what they like 
and what they didn't like. 
They'll come up and say. 
'Don't make movies like that 
anymore.' I get that a lot." 

"Things We Lost in the 
Fire," however, represents 
Berry's return to smaller, 
more earnest filmmaking, a 
project where "nobody's get- 
ting big paychecks" and 
there's no "diva stuff." 

"You're there because 
you love the material, you 
love what you do," she said. 
Berry plays Audrey a 
mother of two whose idyllic 
life is shattered when her 
husband (David Duchovny) 
is killed trying to rescue ;i 
woman from her violent 
husband. In her desperation 
and grief. Audrey forges a 
deep and unusual bond with 
his close friend, Jerry, a 
lawyerturned-heroin addict 
played by Benicio Del Toro, 
an actor with whom Berry 
had long wanted to work. 

The dynamic between 
their characters is layered 
and complicated, much like 
it might be in real life. And 
the film's rawness and hope- 
ful ending drew Berry to the 
role- from the moment she 
read Allan Loeb's script, 
long before Oscar-nominat- 
ed Danish director Susanne 
Bier was attached to the 
project. 

"It scared me to death, 
and usually, when that hap- 
pens, I'm like a moth to a 
flame," Berry said. "And it 
was something I haven't 
experienced in my own life, 
this kind of loss, the devas- 
tation of losing someone so 
close to you, so sudden, so 
tragically. That scared me, 
and I thought this would be 
an interesting challenge for 
me as an artist. But also as 
a human being." 

Bier, who favors inti- 
mate material that often 
grapples wiv.h familial 
issues, bonded with Berry 
over her insistence that the 
film avoid sentimentality. 
Instead, Bier said, they 
asked themselves^ "How 
much of a love story is it? 
How close can they get? 
When is that point where 
you actually realize that you 
love somebody?" 

"It was pretty firm in 
the script," Bier said. "But it 
was also very clear that that 
process has to be done little 
by little throughout the 



entire shooting. The devel- 
opment of that character 
was such a nuanced, such a 
sensitive thing." 

To prepare for the role, 
Berry read Joan Didion's 
Pulitzer Prize-winning 
niem.oir "The Year of 
Magical Thinking," about 
Didion's own struggle to 
recover from the sudden 
death of her husband, John 
Gregory Dunne. Berry also 
studied grief psychology. 
And then, she just drew on 
her own experiences with 
personal tragedy. 

"When you go through 
tragedy ... you never go back 
to the way you were," Berry 
said. "You don't go back to 
the same thing. You're forev- 
er changed. But it doesn't 
mean your life can't be as 
good. Or even better" 

As Berry and Bier dis- 
sected the themes of "Things 
We Lost in the Fire," the 
subject of unconditional love 
surfaced. Bier was explain- 
ing that Berry's character, 
Audrey, expressed her grief 
by lashing out at her chil- 
dren, a scene she felt 
revealed the true depth of 
love she felt for them. 

"Where love is not 
unconditional," Bier said, 
"you sort of restrain yourself 
and force yourself into some 
sort of unnatural pattern of 
feeling." 

Berry picked up the 
thought. 

"Because you have the 
feeling you're being judged 
for what you're doing," the 
actress said, with sentiment 
that seemed to echo her own 
experience. "And love might 
be taken away if you're less 
than perfect. If it's real love, 
even if it's in relationships 
with friends, you can be 
your real self because you 
know that the love isn't 
going anywhere." 

Berry has maintained 
her sense of humor about 
the response to some of her 
roles. When she earned the 
2005 Razzie for worst 
actress for "Catwoman," 
Berry accepted the award in 
person. 

"To be at the top," she 
said at the time, "you must 
experience rock-bottom." 

Berry makes no apolo- 
gies for her choices now. 

"I'm not the actor who's 
always going to give you the 
dramatic performances one 
after the other," she said. 
"That's not where I creative- 
ly live." 




Look in next week's issue for the answer! 




Last week: Field gun in park off 
of IVlain Street. 



Pages 



TM: CLAMOir CALL 



ClissifMs 



October 25, 2007 



M Ids, Traid, I'mplpent, For Rent, Persooals, and lipnrnil \t 




LAKEN APARTMENTS- 
fully furnished. Utilities 
kcludei Available Fall 
20()H/Spring 2009 for 1-3 
people. Houses available for 
2-8 people. Exceptionally 
nice and CLEAN. Call Patty 
at (814) 715-3121 or 229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
ments.com 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 

GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus, 
See them at vvww.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. H77-562-1020 



FOR RENT: 2008-2009 
school year. 2 bedroom 
house for females close to 
campus. 226-6867 

SILVER SPRING 
RENTALS • Apartments for 
2-4 people and houses for 2- 
8 people available for Fall 
2007/ Spring 2008 semes- 
ters. Call Barb at (814)-379- 
9721. 

2 Bedroom Apartment avail- 
able. Close, walk to campus. 
Private entrance, recently 
updated. Furnished. $1600 
a semester per student. 
Utilities included. Monthly 
negotiable. Call 814-316- 
6547 




Next to campus, various 
houses and apartments. 
Accommodating 1-4 stu- 
dents or groups of 3-4. Some 
include utilities. Rent starts 
at $1200 per semester. Visit 
us online at 

www.aceyrental.com or call 
Brian at 814-227-1238 

EAGLE PARK APART- 
MENTS, FULLY FUR- 
NISHED, INCLUDES 
UTILITIES 3 BLOCKS 
FROM CAMPUS. LEAS- 
ING FOR SPRING, SUM- 
MER, & FALL. SAFE, 
CLEAN, AND BEAUTI- 
FUL. (814)-226-4300 
www.eagle-park.net. 
Located at 301 Grand Ave, 
Clarion Pa. 

Now renting: Fall 08-Spring 
09. 1-2-3 & 4 person fur- 
nished apartments. Only 
one block from campus. 
Some with utilities includ- 
ed. Off street parking 227- 
2568 



iMiiiiiMii 



J 



Sprmg Break 2008 . rtt-ii 
Trips, Earn Cash and Go 
Free. Call for group dis- 
counts. Best Prices 
Guaranteed! Jamaica, 
Cancun, Acapulco, 

Bahamas, S. Padre, Florida. 
800-648-4849 or 

www.ststravel.com 



My precious son, 

Jesus always loves and 

cares for you. 

Congratulations Amy and 

Dom on your engagement! 

Love, 

Mom and Dad 



Aunt Pat, 

Thanks for the pumpkin 

roll! 

Love, 

The Clarion Call 

Brittnee- 

Whats another word for 

gangster? 

■ Lindsay 



GO PENS! 



Grandma & Pap, 
I love and miss you. 
Love, 
Staph 

Mom, 

Get well soon! 

Love, 

Steph 

Thanks for being the 
Clarion Call's #1 supporter 
Leslie Ann!! 



Go Red Socks! 



John Santa, 

I hereby declare war with 
you on this 25th of October 
through the classified page. 
You are not returning my 
phone calls and I do not 
appreciate it!! I'm sending 
the Spice Girls to find you... 
With love, 
G-Love 



Mel & Jamie. 

We miss your inspiration.. 

Please visit soon! 

Love, Linds & Shasta 



Dr Hilton, 

We miss you! Stop by the 

office! 

■ The Call staff 

If you've got time to lean, 
you've got time to clean!! 



Cousin Jonah, 

I hope you had fun in Sea 

World. I expect Shamu to 

arrive in the mail any day 

now. 



World Series Trivia 

How much do you know? 



ON rUESVAY, mVEMdEK 677^, V(97T. 

And> 



MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

; acemontana@ccybernet.com ^^ 

: (814)226-7316 

: - pArown m the cANvwAJt 




Take the Trivia Quiz 
Compiled by Lindsay GryBtar 

Who pitched the only perfect game in World Series history? 
A. Bob Feller B. Don Larsen 

C. Curt Schilling D. Babe Ruth 

Which team has won the most World Series titles? 
A. St. Louis Cardinals B. Boston Red Sox 

C. New York Yankees D. Pittsburgh Pirates 

What team won the first World Series? 

A. Boston Americans B. Boston Red Sox 

C. New York Yankees D. Pittsburgh Pirates 

Who holds the record for most hits in a single World Series game? 
A. Babe Ruth B. Bill Mazeroski 

C. Paul Molitor D. Reggie Jackson 

In what ballpark did Babe Ruth hit his famous "called shot" in the 1932 World Series'' 
A. Fenway Park B. Yankee Stadium 

C. Polo Grounds D. Wrigley Field 



'P'9'3t''B'e'0 2qi:saaMSuv 




Registration begins Monday, October 15 



Clarion University is offering a winter intersession between the fall 
and spring semesters. All courses offered in the session will be 
delivered on-line. Students do not need to be on campus to take a 
class. It IS expected there will be a variety of courses offered but the 
exact list of courses will not be available for a l^w weeks. This is a 
separate terai like the summer pre-session. There is a separate tuition 
charge but no additional financial aid will be available. Students are 
only permitted to take one class. Classes begin Monday, December 
17. after the last day of the fall semester examinations and run until 
Januarv 7, 2008. 



inter Intersession offerings 




Because most of the university will be closed for part of this session, no 
on-campus library or student services will be provided. Office services 
(registrar, bursar, financial aid. computing services, etc.) will be limited and 
not available for one week in the middle of the term. Credit/No Record will 
not be available during this term. Drop/Add period is December 17 ONLY. 

Students Ironi other universities and institutions interested in taking a winter 
intersession course should contact the Admissions office at 814-393-2306 
or e-mail at http:/M ww.cIarion.edu/admiss/ and click on 

http://www.clarion.edu/registrar/pdfs/VVinterIntersessionfonn.pdf 

to fill out a 'Quick Admit" form. 

Graduate applicants CANNOT use the quick admit forni. Click on 
wwvv.clarion.edii/graduatestudies/apply..siitml for more information. 



Class 

AE260W] 
ARTllOWl 
BIOL 224 Wl 
BSAD240W1 
CHEM2i] W1 
ECON 140 Wl 
ECON 221 Wl 
ED225W1 
ED 563 W1 
ED567W1 
ED575W1 
ELED327W] 
ELED329W1 
ESlll Wl 
HPE m Wl 
LS 576 Wl 
IS 576 W2 
MKTG491 Wl 
MMAJ 443 Wl 
PHIL 215 Wl 
PHIL 357 Wl 
PSY211 Wl 
SC 100 Wl 
SPED 418 Wl 
THE 253 Wl 
WS 100 Wl 



Description 

Career Exploration & Planning 

Visual Arts 

Human Biology 

Legal Environment I 

Science & Society 

Consumer Economics 

Econ-Bus Stat I 

Multicultural Education 

Reading Pedagogy 

Sec, Col! & Content Area Reading Instruction 

Seminar in Ctiildren's Literature 

Instructional Strategies & Management for Elementary 

Education Evaluation & Auttientic Assessment 

Basic Earth Science 

Health! Educotion ' 

Scholorly & Professional Communication & Publishing 

Intelligence Community & Information Management 

e-Marketing 

Promotional Writing 

Religions of ttie World 

Philosophy and FemlnisrVi 

Introduction to Psychology 

Introduction to Human Communication 

Exceptionalities Regular Classroom ID & SER 

Introduction to Theatre 

Sun/ey of Women's Studies 



Instructor 

Tedjeske 

Franchino 

Smith 

Shepard 

Bering 

R. Raehsler 

R Balough 

Goodmon 

Maguire 

Murphy 

Ellermyer 

L. Brown 

J. Brown 

Vega 

W, English 

Krueger 

Reid 

Huddleston 

Lingwoll 

Lovin 

J, Phillips 

Vilberg 

M. Xuehn 

Turner 

Michel 

Burghardt 



If you have any questions concerning winter jntersession, contact 
Lynne Fleisher at 814-393-2778 or Ifleisher@clarion.edu. 

NOTE: Fall 20()7 grading will not be completed until 12/20/07. Students 
seeking information on grade status before 12/20/07 should contact their 
instructor directly. 



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i. .Ill .itliiiiuniu .itiioii .^jii.il ,.()[k.!lu(iily snipliiycT 




CLARION 

UNIVERSITY 



<INCE no 



October 25. 2007 



CLARION 



sssm 



Harrison off to a successful start 



Page 9 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer®clarion.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 23 - In case 
you had not noticed, the 
Golden Eagle volleyball 
team ia having quite a sea- 
son. Recently picking up 
their school-record seventh 
consecutive 20-win season, 
Clarion is currently looking 
for their first PSAC playoff 
berth since 2004. 

There have been several 
key players, many of them 
returning from last season 
for the Golden Eagles dur- 
ing their march towards the 
playoffs. However, there 
has been one key new addi- 
tion that is not heralded as 
much. No, it is not a Golden 
Eagle player, but rather 
their coach. 

Coming from Maryland 
where she was previously 
an assistant with the 
University of Maryland- 
Baltimore County, Jennifer 
Harrison was named head 
coach for the Golden Eagle 
volleyball team last 
February. When asked why 
she wanted to come to 
Clarion, she said, "I truly 
enjoyed the small town 
atmosphere. It's a great 
place to raise a family while 
having a somewhat normal 
family life." 

Replacing interim coach 
Jodi Burns who had 
replaced Tracy Fluharty the 
previous season, Harrison 
became the third head coach 
for the volleyball team in 
the past three seasons. 

The continual coaching 
changes had shown on the 



Dt'spite winning 20 games 
each of the two seasons 
before Harrison's arrival. 
Clarion only had four sec- 
tion wins to show for its 
efforts. As Christina 
Steiner noted in response to 
the coaching changes, "We 
had had a lot of different 
coaches, so that was defi- 
nitely hard for us." 

With her new style of 
coaching though, Harrison 
has assuaged any doubts 
that her senior class may 
have had. "She's changed 
things for the better. She's 
made a huge impact, and it 
shows on the court," said 
outside hitter Sarah Fries. 

Fellow senior Vicky 
Gentile echoed similar sen- 
timents saying, "I think she 
(Harrison) has impacted us 
a lot. I've learned so much 
from her in a year." 

Besides improving the 
returning volleyball players. 
Coach Harrison was instru- 
mental in recruiting some 
key Golden Eagle pieces for 
the future. At the forefront 
of her recruiting efforts are 
middle hitters Sarah 
Sheffield and Nicole 
Andrusz. Going into their 
game against California on 
Tuesday, Andrusz and 
Sheffield were fourth and 
fifth respectively in kills for 
the Golden Eagles while 
also being first and second 
in blocks. 

In addition. Golden 
Eagle fans were given 
another look at the future of 
Golden Eagle volleyball last 
Friday Oct. 19 against 
Cheyney. Opting to give her 
starters the night off, 
Harrison used some of her 



setter Dani Hughes and out- 
side hitter Amanda 
Stefanov. The result was a 
3-0 win against the Owls. 

Asked about her recruit- 
ing efforts, Harrison said, "I 
feel that thus far, we are 
attracting the type of ath- 
lete that will help us in the 
future." 

On her younger players, 
she said, "Of course with 
having four underclassmen 
lAndrusz, Sheffield, Leeann 
Higgin-botham, and Katie 
Aurandl getting significant 
playing time Ithis seasonl, 
this will help them step into 
leadership roles next sea- 
son." 

Despite the early suc- 
cess of the team, Harrison 
realizes they have a long 
way to go but believes they 
can get there. 

"My goal is to be at the 
top of the PSAC. I think 
that this is a realistic goal I 
and with the current suc- 
cess of our team, recruiting 
obviously becomes an easier 
process," said Harrison. 

If the current Golden 
Eagle campaign is any indi- 
cation, then Clarion volley- 
ball fans have a lot to look 
forward to in the coming 
seasons. 

The Golden Eagles suf- 
fered a setback in their play- 
off hopes with a loss at 
California 3-0 Tuesday 
night. With the loss, the 
Golden Eagles are now 22-4 
with a 5-3 record in the 
PSAC-West. Clarion lost for 
the first time since Oct. 2. 
The Golden Eagles will next 
be in action Friday Oct. 26 
against Barton. Game time 
is at 7. 



Soccer shutout for seventh straight game 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_tckovalovs®cla non .ed u 

CLARION, Oct 20 - The 
Golden Eagles soccer team 
traveled to PSAC-West divi- 
sion leader Slippery Rock (7- 
1-1, 14-3-1) this past 
Thursday hoping to turn 
their luck around, but fell 2- 
0. The loss was the sixth 
consecutive shutout against 
the Golden Eagles. 

Meghan McGrath 

opened the scoring in the 
23rd minute off of a feed 
from Jaimi Wilson. It didn't 
take long for the Pride to 
score again. Danielle 
Cooper scored just six min- 
utes later off of a pass from 
teammate Courtney Hoover. 

Clarion was held to only 
two shots in the first half, 
ending the game with 12. 
Rachael Schmitz led the 



team with three shots. 
Caitlin Borden and Gina 
Shero each added two. 

Slippery Rock had 25 of 
their own shots, with 13 
coming in the first half. 
Cooper led the way with 
five, followed closely by 
McGrath who had four. Five 
more players had two shots 
each. Only four of Slippery 
Rock's 17 players were held 
without a shot. 

Following the disap- 
pointing loss to Slippery 
Rock, the Golden Eagles 
returned home to take on 
cross-division rival Bloom- 
sburg (7-5-4). The game 
ended in a M tie after two 
overtime periods. The tie 
gave Clarion an overall 
record of 4-10-3 

Clarion fell behind in 
the 18th minute when 
Ashley Brucker directed a 
shot into the back of the net. 
It wasn't until the 54th 



minute that Clarion tied it 
up. 

Borden notched her first 
goal of the season on a head- 
er into the corner. The goal 
was the first time since 
Sept. 30 that the Golden 
Eagles have scored a goal. 

Bloomsburg had a total 
of 20 shots on goal, nine in 
the first two halves and one 
in each overtime. Kelly 
Modes lead the Huskies 
with six shots. Brucker and 
Kelsey Stoka each had three 
shots. 

The Golden Eagles had 
put up 13 shots of their own. 
Schmitz and Alyssa Jacobs 
had a team high three shots 
each. Chelsea Wolff and 
Hillary Deiter each added 
twoof their own. 

Clarion wraps up its 
season Friday Oct. 26 at 
home against the 

Shippensburg Raiders (7-11) 
in a cross-division game. 



Clarion runner s looking forward to PSAC's 



Sports Information 

rtierman@cl3rion.edu 
crossetti@clarion.edu 



court for the Golden Eagles, younger players including 

Torre's tenure over in New York 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.edu 

As of right now, it seems 
99.9 percent certain that 
Joe Torre will not return to 
manage the New York 
Yankees next season. After 
12 seasons in the Bronx, 
Torre opted not to accept the 
Yankees one year contract 
offer to return to manage 
the team for the 2008 sea- 
son. According to various 
reports, the Yankees offered 
Torre a contract valued 
somewhere in the $5 million 
range, with the possibility to 
earn another $3 million in 
performance incentives. 



Love him or hate him, 
Joe Torre brought success 
back to a Yankee franchise 
that had not tasted it for 
quite some time. In his 
twelve seasons on the job, 
Torre led the Yankees to the 
playoffs for 12 straight sea- 
sons, 10 American League 
East championships, and 
four World Series wins in six 
appearances. Torre's first 
World Series win in 1996 
was the Yankees first since 
1978. 

Any way you look at it, 
Torre's long stay in New 
York is a rarity these days in 
professional baseball. 

Looking around through the 
major leagues, only six man- 
agers have been with their 



respective teams for at least 
five years: St. Louis's Tony 
LaRussa, Atlanta's Bobby 
Cox, Anaheim's Mike 
Scioscia, Colorado's Clint 
Hurdle, Cleveland's Eric 
Wedge and Milwaukee's 
Ned Yost. 

Besides Cox, who has 22 
seasons in Atlanta, and 
LaRussa, who will be going 
into his 13th season with 
the Cardinals, no other 
manager comes close to 
matching Torre in tenure 
and none even close to his 
results. 

The combined four titles 
of LaRussa, Cox and 
Scioscia can only match 
Torre's total championships. 

Torre's run of success. 



CLARION, Oct. 23 - The 
Clarion University cross 
country team led by senior 
Erin Richard is looking for- 
ward to the 2007 PSAC 
Championships Saturday 
Oct. 27 at Kutztown. 

"We are excited that the 
championship season is 
here," Clarion's second-year 
head coach Jayson Resch 
said. "This is what we have 
been training for all season. 
Based on how much we have 
continued to improve 
through the season and how 
hard the team has worked 
in current training, our goal 
for Saturday is to place in 
the top five." 

fflK>?d«' to achieve our 
goal of a top five finish, we 
will have to race well as a 
team," Resch said. "Our 
number two through num- 




ber five runners will have to 
run as a pack working 
together to beat their oppo- 
nents." 

Richardj Clarion's num- 
ber one runner, is expected 
to contend for a PSAC title 
this year after missing last 
year's championship with 
an injury. She returned for 
the cross country Regionals 
a year ago earning All- 
Region honors with an Uth- 
place finish and then had 
one of the best track season 
in school history. 

She was a three-time 
Ail-American in 2O07 taking 
seventh in the indoor 5,000, 
fourth in the outdoor 10,000 
and third in the outdoor 
5,000 while winning three 
PSAC Championships 
(indoor Mile, outdoor 3,000 
m^ 5,0^0) and was named 

„tJjeJJiwtftiSta^.^ck40d 
Field and Cross Country 
Association East Region 
Women's Indoor Track 
Athlete of the Year and the 
PSAC Outdoor Women's 



while not unique to the 
Yankee franchise, is unique 
in baseball. In a sporting 
world where dynasties are 
becoming rarer and rarer, 
the Yankees once again set 
themselves above the rest of 
the baseball world. 

To understand just how 
special their four World 
Series victories in five years 
actually is, consider this. 
Since 1990, the Blue Jays 
and Marlins are the only 




Field Goaf Contest Champ 




other teams besides the 
Yankees to have won multi- 
ple World Series. Both 
teams won two titles in that 
span, and the Blue Jays did 
it in consecutive years. 

Despite all the success, 
the Yankees appear ready 
for life without Joe Torre. 
Former Florida Marlins 
manager Joe Girardi has 
already interviewed for the 
job. Don Mattingly is also in 
the mix and according to 



TVack Athlete of the Year. 

"Erin's individual goal is 
to win the PSAC champi- 
onship," Resch said. "After 
missing last year's race, she 
is very focused on racing 
well this year. She has 
worked tremendously hard 
since the fall of last year, 
and she spent a lot of time 
this summer working on her 
strength in order to be more 
prepared for this portion of 
the season. She truly is the 
leader of the team and is 
prepared to accomplish her 
goals." 

Resch also believes that 
a pair of juniors, Molly 
Smathers and Caitlin Palko, 
could finish in the top 20. 

"Molly and Caitlin both 
have an excellent chance to 
place in the top 20 and earn 
All-PSAC honors [which go 
to the top 20 runnerslj' 
Resch said. 'They will work 
together to try and win the 
award." 

See "CROSS COUN- 
TRY" on page 10. 

ESPN he is considered the 
front runner. ESPN's 
Buster Olney has reported 
that the Yankees may 
announce their next manag- 
er as early as this Friday 

There is no telling how 
much of an impact a new 
manager will have on the 
Yankees. One thing is for 
certain, whoever follows 
Joe Torre will have one very 
hard act to follow. 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Doug Knepp - Intramural. Recreation, & Club Sport Director 393-1667 



Tennis Championshi 



Will Mowris - 45 yard Field Goal 



Flag Football Results 

D9 Destroyers 
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Goonles 37-33 
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Outdoor Soccer Champs 
Men's Division "St Elmo's Fire" 



Women - Megan Parsons 

(Megan Parsons beat Morgan Welsh 6-0) 




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Co-Rec Division "Dunlap*' 



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Indoor Soccer 

3 on 3 Basketball 

Tug of War 

Table Tennis 




Daniel Pajak, Mike Faaini, Alex Brecht, 
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Yeager, Ken Ramsey, Mike Goth, Nate 
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2*^° Place -"PorkChops" 



Men-Devin Burda 

fPevin Burda beat Robb Lawrence 6-2) 



Steve Spelcher, Drew Carpenter, 
Hauser. Jake Porter, Brian Dwer, Kyle 
Smith, Mac Luke, and Adam Skolnik 




Adam Skolnfck, Brian Dwyer, Brian Hocker, 
Drew Carpender, Laruen SlenoskI, Rachel, 
Dan Poyack. Mackenzie Lulee, Brad 
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Pafle 10 



TfflS CLMION CAUL 



October 21 2007 



Sfifts 



Todij: [m Cwit r? M fwm f wM trnfjn te at Fairmoyo t St. 



Corin and Devin Rombach finding success together in doubles 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s„ekbowser®clarion.eclu 

CLARION. Oct. 23 - Corin 
and Devin Rombach have 
been around the game oi 
tennis since before they 
could even hold a racquet. 
Now the two sisters are the 
Golden Eagles number one 
doubles team and competed 
together in the PSAC 
Individual Championships, 
Oct. 6 and 7. 

Corin, a senior and 
Devin, a sophomore, com- 
piled a 7-2 doubles record 
this season. In the PSAC 
Championships they lost 9- 
8, (9-7) in the tiebreaker, to 
Marie Kostaris and Rose 
Conwell of West Chester. 

The two didn't get a 
chance to play together com- 
petitively much before this 
season but have been mak- 
ing the most of their chance. 




# k*- 



The Rombacli sisters, Conn and Devin, are pictured above after 
their first doubles victory together against East Stroudsburg. 
They won their match 8-2 helping the Golden Eagles to a 5-4 vic- 
tory. fPhoto Courtesy of Lori Sabatose) 



"In high school you can 
only play singles or doubles 
but not both." said Corin, 
who played singles at 
Prattsburgh Central High 
School in Prattsburgh, NY. 
"So it's been really exciting 



this year to get that chance 
finally, because 1 always 
thought that we could be a 
strong team." 

It didn't take the 
Rombach sisters long to find 
success either. Thev won 



Football drops to 0-8 with tough 
21-14 loss at Fairmont State 



their first match of the sea- 
son, against East 
Stroudsburg's Shana Morris 
and Amanda Rutt in 
Bloomsburg, 8-2. That win 
helped the Golden Eagles 
beat East Stroudsburg 5-4 
and set the tone for a 4-2 fall 
season. 

Even though the two 
never got much competitive 
playing time together, all 
the practicing together 
through the years has 
helped Corin and Devin get 
a great understanding for 
each other's game. 

"I can always tell what 
she is going to do next," said 
Devin, who transferred to 
Clarion this year and is 
playing tennis at the colle- 
giate level for the first time. 
"We are definitely at an 
advantage because we have 
always played together. We 
both know the other's game 
by heart. This alone gives us 
great on-court chemistry, 



not to mention the fact that 
we are best friends." 

"I could probably close 
my eyes pre-shot and tell 
you what Devin is going to 
do with the ball and where 
she's going to be," said 
Corin. 

The two also know 
exactly how to push each 
other's buttons and get one 
another motivated at key 
times. 

"What's great about 
being sisters is that they 
know what gets each other 
going or what to say to 
pump each other up," said 
Lori Sabatose, Clarion 
University Tennis Coach. 
'They get along so well on 
and off the court." 

Corin, the elder of the 
two sisters, also enjoyed sin- 
gles success this season. She 
held the Golden Eagles 
number one singles position 
and advanced to the second 
round of the singles tourna- 



ment at the PSAC 
Championships. 

Corin said that playing 
with her sister and their 
aggressive mindset while 
playing together has helped 
her singles game as well. 
She also believes that Devin 
will be able to become a 
dominant singles player as 
well. 

"With Devin it's all 
about realizing how good 
she really is," said Corin. 
"As soon as she comes to 
terms with that, she can 
give any top player in the 
conference a run for their 
money. She's going to be 
dangerous and I can't wait 
to see it." 

For now, the two are just 
enjoying their success 
together in doubles. 

"Being able to play with 
Cori at this level is definite- 
ly the highlight of my 
career," said Devin. 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscritchf@clarion.edu 

FAIRMONT, Oct. 20 - On 
Saturday night at Duvall" 
Rosier Field, the Golden 
Eagles endured their most 
distressing loss of the sea- 
son, losing to Fairmont 
State 21-14. This loss 
dropped Clarion to 0-8 with 
only three games remain- 
ing. 

With 11:29 remaining in 
the first quarter, Fairmont 
quarterback Vic Bradford 
rushed for 12 yards and a 
touchdown to put the 
Falcons ahead 7-0. 

With 2^07 remaining. 
Clarion responded when 
quarterback Tyler Huether 
threw a 29-yard strike to 
Pierre Odom for a game- 
tying touchdown. 

Just before halftime the 
Golden Eagles scored again, 
when Eddie Emmanuel ran 
27 yards for a touchdown 
advancing the Clarion lead 
to 14-7 heading into the 
intermission. 

With just over a minute 
remaining in the third, 
Fairmont running back 
Doug Brazill ran for a one- 
yard touchdown, but the 
PAT was missed, so the 
Golden Eagles remained in 
the lead, 14-13. 

In the fourth quarter, 
Fairmont had a third down 
and 26 at its own four, but 



Brazill rushed for 21 yards, 
which brought up a fourth 
and five. On the ensuing 
punt. Clarion was penahzed 
for having twelve men on 
the field, giving the Falcons 
a first down. 

Brazill then had a 56- 
yard run all the way down 
to the Golden Eagle one- 
yard hne. 

On the next play, 
Bradford ran for one yard 
and the touchdown, on what 
turned out to be the game- 
winning score. The Falcons 
converted the two-point con- 
version, to take a 21-14 lead 
over the Golden Eagles with 
7:39 remaining. 

Clarion dominated vir- 
tually every offensive cate- 
gory. The Golden Eagles 
had 435 yards of total 
offense, including 230 pass- 
ing yards and 205 rushing 
yards. The Falcons had 361 
yards of offense, including 
281 rushing yards and 80 
passing yards. 

Clarion converted 23 
first downs, compared to 
Fairmont State's 20. 
Huether completed 17 of his 
38 passes for 230 yards and 
a touchdown, while 
Bradford went 3-11 for 80 
yards, but rushed for two 
touchdowns. 

Emmanuel rushed 15 
times for 103 yards and a 
touchdown, while the 
Falcons', Brazill rushed 33 
times for 219 yards and a 



touchdown. 

Odom also caught six 
passes for 77 yards and a 
score. 

However, the Golden 
Eagles continuously shot 
themselves in the foot on 
Saturday night, committing 
15 penalties for 140 yards, 
including the huge too many 
men on the field penalty on 
what turned out to be the 
game-winning drive. 

The Golden Eagles will 
try once again, to get their 
first win of the season this 
coming Saturday when they 
host visiting lUP on 
Saturday at 1 p.m. 



"CROSS COUNTRY" 
from page 9. 

Palko, who was 53rd at 
last year's PSAC's, is com- 
ing off a solid track season 
that saw her qualify for both 
the indoor and outdoor 
PSAC Championships in the 
5,000 placing 14th indoors 
and 11th outdoors, while 
Smathers is a transfer to 
Clarion this year who hadn't 
run cross country since high 
school. 

Junior Kate 

Ehrensberger gives Clarion 
some added experience at 
the PSAC's having fmidied 
49th last season, while 
sophomores Suzanne 

Schwerer and Lisa Nickel 
and freshmen Kate 
Reinhart, Annmarie Clifford 
and Rachel Slade will all be 



running in their first PSAC 
championship race. 

"This team has worked 
very hard throughout the 
year," Reach said. "They are 
a very dedicated group of 
student-athletes who per- 
form well in competition 
and in the classroom. I'm 
very proud of this team, and 
I believe they are prepared 
to have a great race this 
weekend." 

Clarion will be back in 
action Nov. 3 at the NCAA 
Regional meet at Lock 
Haven. Clarion had one of 
the best seasons in school 
history ih 5002 Wh^ it ftn- 
iabed third at PSAC'a, sec- 
ond at Regionals and 20th 
in the na^n under lonr 
time head coach Pat 
Mooney. 

The Golden Eagles' last 



All-PSAC runner was 
Melissa Terwilliger, who 
was ninth in 2004. 
Terwilliger has the highest 
finish in schrol history as 
well with a third-place end- 
ing in 2003. 

In addition to her on the 
track and course accom- 
plishments last season, 
Richard was also a 2007 
third-team ESPN The 
Magazine Women's Track 
and Field/Cross Country 
Academic All-America, a 
2007 first-team District 2 
College Division ESPN The 
Magazine Academic All- 
DiWrict Rejection and a 2006 
USTFCCA All-Academi« 
team member not to men- 
tion a Clarion and PSAC 
"Scholar-Athlete" 




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Clarion, Pennsylvania 16214 



CUP debate team hosts tournament 




Volume 94 Issue B 



Jamie Richard 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjmrlctiard@clanon.eclu 

CLARION, Oct. 30 - Mary 
Washington College 

emerged victorious in all 
three categories at the 
debate tournament Clarion 
hosted this past weekend. 

The tournament fea- 
tured approximately 40 
teams from 12 schools and 
was the first to be hosted by 
Clarion University since the 
American Debate 

Association National 

Tournament in 2001. 

Competition began 
Friday at 3:30 p.m. with 
venues in Still Hall, 
Founders Hall and Stevens 
Hall. 

The first day consisted 
of preliminary debates in all 
three levels of collegiate 
debate, novice, junior varsi- 
ty and varsity. 

The national topic for 
debate teams was The U.S. 
federal government's con- 
structive engagement with 
the governments of one or 
more of the following: Iran, 
Syria, Lebanon, 

Afghanistan, or Palestinian 
Authority, and its offer 
should include a security 
guarantee or a substantial 
increase in foreign assis- 
tance. 

A panel of judges award- 
ed points to individual 
speakers based on their per- 
formances which deter- 
mined the outcome of the 
debates. 

Two additional rounds 
took place later that 




Associate professor of mass media arts and journalism and communication studies and coach of the CUP debate team, Jim Lyie 
worked with the University to organize the tournament which he hopes will be an annual event. (The Clarion Call/Sean Montgomery) 



evening, where the last two 
rounds of preliminaries 
were conducted Saturday 
morning at 8:30 a.m. 

An awards banquet was 
held Saturday evening with 
scheduled remarks from 
Clarion University 

President Joseph 

Grunenwald. 

Awards were given to 
individual speakers who 
performed well in the pre- 
liminary rounds. The final 
rounds took place Sunday at 
8 a.m. and concluded with 



Mary Washington College of 
•Virginia winning all three 
categories. 

Mary Washington 

College placed four teams in 
the novice round, one in the 
junior varsity round and one 
in the varsity round. All of 
these teams went undefeat- 
ed once in the elimination 
round and were only elimi- 
nated when forced to go up 
against each other, resulting 
in an automatic win for the 
team with a higher seed 
ranking. 



Other finalist teams includ- 
ed: one team from Liberty 
College and three teams 
from George Mason 
University in the novice 
level, one team each from 
John Carroll University, 
University of Rochester and 
Wayne State University in 
the junior varsity level, and 
two teams from Wayne 
State University, one team 
from Boston College, one 
team from Liberty 
University and one team 
from University of 



Pittsburgh in the varsity 
level. Colleges participating 
in the tournament included 
the following: Capital 
University, James Madison 
University, Methodist 

University and West 
Virginia University. 

The Clarion debate 
team did participate in the 
debates but was not actually 
judged because they hosted 
the tournament. 

See "DEBATE" 
continued on page 2. 



Military Science 110 new senate allocates funds 
aiternative to HP 111 



Lacey Lichvar 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_lelictivar@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 30- Clarion 
University will be offering 
an alternative to HP 111 
beginning Spring '08. 

HP HI is mandatory for 
all students to fulfill general 
education requirements. 

Students will now have 
the option of taking Military 
Science 110 in the fall or 112 
in the spring. 

These courses are 
taught through the ROTC 
program however they are 
open to all students and 
require no commitment to 
join the military. 

First Liutenant (LT) 
Lawrence Fagen, Assistant 
Professor of Military 
Science said that these 
courses cover concepts of 
health such as first aid, 
nutrition, physical fitness 
and stress management. 

"Due to the fact that this 
course covers areas such as 
stress management, physi- 
cal fitness, and especially 
first aid, this makes it a 
very fitting course for a col- 
lege level," said elementary 
education and special edu- 
cation major and junior. 



Danielle DiPerna. "We went 
over most of the basics that 
are covered in a general 
health class in high school, 
so I think this course sounds 
like a great opportunity for 
CUP students." 

In addition, students 
enrolled in this course will 
be required to do physical 
training and will have an 
opportunity to take a lab 
that will get them out of the 
classroom and give them 
hands on experience. 

Senior mass media arts 
and journalism major, Ben 
Elliot said he beheves that 
the health courses are very 
valuable at the collegiate 
level. 

"I think any way that we 
can promote health and 
wellness is good, whether 
that be through education or 
excercise," Elliot said. 

The lab does not have to 
be taken in order to receive 
credit as an HP requirement 
but all students enrolled in 
MS 110 or 112 are welcome 
to take it. 

If a student elects to 
take the course but not the 
lab, LT Lawrence Fagen 
assures that they can be 
written into the course so 
that the lab will not be 
included in their schedule. 



Students taking this 
course can attend either 
Monday or Wednesday from 
9-9:50 a.m. and will have 
physical training every 
Wednesday from 7-7:50 a.m. 

The lab will take place 
every Tuesday. 

LT Lawrence Fagen 
encourages students to not 
shy away from this course 
just because it is military 
related. 

"The only requirement 
is the willingness to learn," 
Fagen said. "We will meet 
you where you are." 

The ROTC program is 
an elective and trains stu- 
dents for leadership posi- 
tions in the Army. National 
Guard or Reserves. 

The university offers 
basic courses for freshmen 
and sophomores and 
advanced courses for juniors 
and seniors. 

Students can try out the 
program during their fresh- 
men or sophomore years 
and do not have to make a 
commitment until their jun- 
ior year. 

The ROTC program pro- 
vides opportunities for full 
academic scholarships and 
the ability to hold a job out- 
side of ones service to the 
military. 



Ian Erickson 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJeerickson@clarion.edu 

The student senate met to 
discuss new allocations and 
upcoming events. 

The main topic of discus- 
sion was the new proposed 
allocations. The first alloca- 
tion was the Anthropology 
Club, which is taking a trip 
to Washington D.C. for the 
American Anthological 
Association Conference. 
The organization was 
requesting additional funds 
hotel and transportation 
costs. The organization was 
allocated $797 with a 20-0-0 
vote. 

Interhall Council was 
the next allocation topic. 
They are going to a confer- 
ence at Bowling Green. The 
conference deals with show- 
ing what Interhall Council 
has done and how they can 
compare to other councils in 
the country. In previous 
years at the conference 
Clarion has won regional 
awards for events such as 
Hall Olympics. The club 
also asked for assistance 
with paying for transporta- 
tion and hotel and received 
$1,244 with a 19-0-1. 

The National 

Communications 
Association (NCA) request- 
ed funds to go to the 
National Communications 



Association conference in 
Chicago. 

Last year the club went 
to the conference in San 
Antonio. The five executive 
board members are going to 
the conference and they 
asked for help with trans- 
portation and hotel costs 
and received $2527 with a 
19-0-1 vote. 

The final allocation was 
for the student senate exec- 
utive board. They are going 
to a conference in Dallas 
and received $3852 with a 
18-0-2 vote. 

"At this conference we 
will listen to different things 
concerning government, and 
we vdll try to use this infor- 
mation to improve our stu- 
dent senate," said student 
senate treasurer and 
Human Resources and 
Management major. 

Heather Puhalla. 

In the president's report, 
molecular biology/pre-med 
major Dustin McElhattan 
said the senate was in casu- 
al attire for the meeting 
because the senators had 
donated $83 to the Save 
Darfur charity 

Normally the senate 
wears business attire, but 
they gave money for charity 
so they could dress casually. 

See "SENATE" 
continued on page 2. 



November 1, 2007 



News 
Briefs 



■ A Promotion and 
Tenure Recognition 
Reception was held to 
honor the following facul- 
ty who received tenure 
and promotion this year: 
Marylyn Harhai, full pro- 
fessor: Todd Lavin, full 
professor; Marilouise 
Michel, full professor! 
Kevin Stemmler, full pro- 
fessor; Henry Alviani, 
associate professor; 
Debbie Ciesielka, associ- 
ate professor and tenure; 
Andrew Lingwall, associ- 
ate professor; Laurie 
Occhipinti, associate pro- 
fessor; Ishmael Doku, 
tenure; Melissa Downes, 
tenure; Kathleen Murphy, 
tenure; Uraina Pack, 
tenure; Brenda Ponsford, 
tenure; and Yun Shao, 
tenure. 

■ Eleven Clarion 
University students pro- 
duced a three-minute 
video, "Film Blanc," that 
will be entered in the 

2007 Insomnia Film 
Fesitval sponsored by 
Apple Inc, which can be 
voted on by visiting 
http://edcommunity.apple. 
com/insomnia_fall07/item 
.php?itemID=1306. 

■ CUP is now accepting 
applications for the 2007- 

2008 Clarion University 
International Scholar 
Awards and will accept 
applications until 
Thursday, Nov. 15. 

■ Clarion University was 
the recipient of a 
"Partnership Award for 
Innovative Energy 
Solutions," for the recent 
implementation of innvo- 
vative energy systems uti- 
lizing natural gas technol- 
ogy. 

■ The Clarion University 
Show Choir will perform a 
free concert on Friday, 
Nov. 2 at 7:30 p.m. in 
Marwick-Boyd 
Auditorium. 

■ Clarion University will 
host the 13th Annual 
Equity Week starting on 
Nov. 12-14, which will fea- 
ture keynote speaker, 
Farooka Guahari. 

■ Assistant professor of 
art at Clarion University, 
Melissa Kuntz, will have 
her paintings displayed as 
part of the Emission 
Theory showcase at La 
Vie in Lawrenceville, Pa., 
from Nov. 3 to Dec. 2. 

■Professors of Education, 
Greg Goodman, Marilyn 
Howe and Patricia 
Kolencik presented a 
round table session 
entitled "Teacher 

Effectiveness, Educational 
Reform, and Student 
Achievement" at the 36th 
annual Teacher Education 
Assembly in October, 



Page 2 



TOR CLARION CALL 



November 1. 2007 



Page 3 



Tlffi CLAHION CALL 



October 25. 2007 



lews 



Google in talks to equip cellphones with software 



Washington Post 

WASHINGTON -Google is 
in late stages of talks with 
various wireless carriers, 
including Sprint, Nextel 
and T-Mobile. about equip- 
ping cellphones with new 
software designed by the 
Internet giant, according to 
three people familiar with 
the discussions. 

It is one of several ven- 
tures Google is making into 
the wireless market as it 
tries to expand its Internet- 
advertising empire to cell- 
phones. 

In addition to forging 
partnerships with wireless 
carriers, Google is also talk- 
ing to software developers 
and handset makers, these 
people said. 

Official agreements 
could be reached during the 
next two weeks. 

Customizing handsets 
with a Google-powered oper- 
ating system would rewrite 
the traditional wireless 
business model. 

Today's wireless carri- 
ers and handset manufac- 
turers largely determine 
which applications con- 
sumers can access with 
their cellphones. 

Google aims to loosen 
those restraints by introduc- 
ing its own system that 
would be compatible with 
third-party features and 
services. 

In other words, software 
companies could design new 
features to work with 
Google's software. 

Opening up wireless 
networks has been Google's 
top agenda in Washington. 
It successfully lobbied the 
Federal Communications 
Commission to apply open- 
access rules to a major auc- 
tion of wireless spectrum. 



The move was hotly 
protested by the top two 
wireless carriers, AT&T and 
Verizon Wireless, who say 
opening up their networks 
can expose their customers 
to unwanted features and 
scams. 

Google has committed to 
spending at least $4.6 bil- 
lion to bid on the licenses for 
the new airwaves, potential- 
ly to build its own wireless 
network. 

The company has also 
forged other wireless part- 
nerships, most recently with 
Sprint to develop software 
for devices that will run on 
its new WiMax network. 

Some industry specula- 
tion indicates that Google 
may also be developing its 
own cellphone. 

"The notion is that if 
you had a more open sys- 
tem, we'd start seeing all 
kinds of new, innovative 
offerings on cellphones, like 
we see now on the Web," 
said Scott Ellison, vice pres- 
ident of mobile and wireless 
communications at IDC, a 
market-research firm. 

Google has made plain 
that it believes the future of 
the wireless industry is in 
advertising. "Your mobile 
phone should be free," paid 
for by ads, Google chief 
executive Eric Schmidt has 
said. 

Investors appear to 
have responded well to 
Google's strategy so far. 
Since going public in August 
2004, Google's stock price 
has increased almost 600 
percent, closing Wednesday 
at an all-time high of 
$694.77 a share. 

But the move into wire- 
less opens new territory for 
Google, which came to dom- 
inate the Web by perfecting 
one product — search — 
then moving into other 



areas, all through its own 
Web site. 

But now it must work 
with decades-old wireless 
carriers that hesitate to give 
up any control, a handful of 
headset manufacturers and 
the wireless industry's poor 
image among consumers. 

"When Google goes into 
wireless in a serious way, 
the expectations around the 
country will change," said 
John Gaunt, an analyst at 
eMarketer. "[Do] you ever go 
to Google technical sup- 
port?" 

Roger Entner, an ana- 
lyst with lAG Research, 
said that as Google rushes 
into the industry, it might 
not be able to duplicate the 
success it's found on the 
Web. 

For starters, he said, 
putting Google software on 
phones requires a great deal 
of complex coordination 
between Google, the carrier 
and the cellular phone mak- 
ers. 

"The challenge is they 
might not be able to repli- 
cate that Google magic on a 
two inch screen compared to 
a 20 inch screen," he said. 

But some industry ana- 
lysts said Google's entry 
into the mobile world is 
being hailed because cus- 
tomer satisfaction with the 
wireless industry is hitting 
all-time lows, giving Google 
— which is known for creat- 
ing easy-to-use, consumer- 
friendly products — a key 
opportunity to enter the 
market. Frustrations with 
long-term contracts, poor 
customer service and weak 
Web-surfing capabilities has 
created considerable enthu- 
siasm for Google's wireless 
strategy, they said. 

Google is also discussing 
various collaborations with 
Verizon Wireless, although 



it is unclear if the carrier 
would agree to tailor its cell- 
phones with Google's soft- 
ware, according to people 
familiar with the matter. 
Verizon Wireless has said it 
declined Apple's offer to 
carry its iPhone, which is 
now available only on 
AT&T's network. 

A deal with Sprint may 
have grown out of its WiMax 
partnership, some analysts 
said. 

Sprint's history of 
equipping its cellphones 
with a variety of mobile 
music and video features 
may be appealing to Google, 
as well as its aggressive 
push into WiMax, which 
will also provide a new busi- 
ness model that is less carri- 
er-controlled. 

Ultimately, some ana- 
lysts say Google's entry into 
mobile could alter the way 
consumers use their phones, 
and could reap huge 
rewards for the company. 

The introduction of 
Google phones would spur 
the kinds of mobile innova- 
tions seen abroad, in partic- 
ular in Asia, where people 
regularly watch television 
on their cell phones, swipe 
cell phones at vending 
machines and take a picture 
of a special bar code to get a 
download of more informa- 
tion, said Charles Golvin, an 
analyst at Forrester 
Research. 

New features might 
include video chat and GPS 
that takes advantage of 
Google Maps software, he 
said. 

"Google's trying to fig- 
ure out how to get more eye- 
balls on their pages," she 
said. "They have to go 
mobile to continue the 
growth curve they've been 
on." 




"DEBATE" continued 
from front page. 

Associate professor of mass 
media arts, journalism and 
communications studies and 
coach of Clarion's debate 
team Jim Lyle said he hopes 
to make the tournament an 
annual event. 

"We ve done really well 
in terms of squad success 
and we really want to get a 
permanent tournament 



established every year," said 
Lyle. "We hope it'll really 
put us on the map and will 
attract a lot of people to 
come here and join the 
team." 

Lyle hopes that the 
Clarion University's out- 
standing hospitality at the 
tournament would make a 
good impression on stu- 
dents. 

"It was really nice this 
year. We provided three 



meals for the teams and 
gave them engraved, wood- 
en clocks at the award cere- 
mony rather than the tradi- 
tional plaque," said Lyle. 
"We also had a permanent 
traveling trophy that will go 
to the winning team's school 
and will be brought back 
every year at the tourna- 
ment. I wouldn't be sur- 
prised if we double the num- 
ber of teams next year." 
Clarion University has 



already competed three 
times this year, most recent- 
ly at the Wayne College 
Tournament. The team also 
opened earlier this year at 
King's College with three 
novice teams and three jun- 
ior varsity teams. 

"Overall, the debate 
team is a great program 
which deserves campus- 
wide recognition and fund- 
ing to propel us to the num- 
ber one spot in the nation," 



The Clarion Call provides a synopsis of all crim- 
inal investigations as conducted by Clarion 
University Public Safety for the month of 
October 2CK)7. All information can be accessed on 
the Public Safety Web page, 
http7/www.clarion.edu/admin/public8afetyAoca- 
tion.shtml. 

■ Oct. 30, at 7:11 p.m., officers were dispatched to a 
report of suspected drug use on the sixth floor of Nair 
Hall. Offices seized suspected marijuana and related 
paraphernalia. Charges will be filed on suspects follow- 
ing lab analysis. 

■ Oct. 27, at 11:30 p.m., Kyle Walley, 19, of Sinking 
Spring, Pa., was cited for underage consumption at 
Laurel Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 27, at 11:30 p.m., Christine Frear, 18, of 
Sinking Spring, Pa., was cited for underage consump- 
tion at Laurel Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 27, at 11:30 p.m., Sarah Rowan, 18, of Monaca, 
Pa., was cited for underage consumption at Laurel 
Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 



■ Oct. 27, at 11:30 p.m.. Shannon McCreary, 19, of 
Monaca, Pa., was cited for underage consumption at 
Laurel Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 



■ Oct. 27, at 11:30 p.m., Stacey Carlisle, 19, of 
Swissvale, Pa., was cited for underage consumption at 
Laurel Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 27,/^t i|:|o^R.m,, Nltll'ola^' LaM:anna, 19, erf 
Lancaster, NY, was cjtea for uriderafge' consumption at 
Laurel Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 27, at 11:30 p.m., Michael Studeny, 18, of 
Valencia, Pa., was cited for underage consumption at 
Laurel Glen Court in Reinhard Villages. 

■ Oct. 24, at 9:40 p.m., University police investigated a 
report made by a resident of Becht hall. She reported 
having received numerous obscene telephone calls from 
the same number. University police were informed by 
resident on Oct. 25 that she found out the identity of 
the caller and it had been a joke nad was declining any 
further action on this incident. 



said sophomore real estate 
major and debate team 
member Tom Toner. "We 
[the debate team] travel all 
along the East Coast in 



tournaments and we always 
seem to come out on top of 
the best schools in the coun- 
try." 



"SENATE" continued 
from front page. 

McElhattan also said in his 
report that he would be 
attending the Board of 
Student Government 

Presidents meeting in 



Harrisburg. 

Puhalla said that the 
treasury had a meeting and 
discussed budgets, religious 
and political funding and if 
tee shirts are considered 
individual or for PR purpos- 
es. 

Dave Walsh, an 



Information Systems and 
Business Administration 
major said that the parlia- 
mentarians went to a parlia- 
mentarian procedure speech 
last week. The speech was a 
student leader empower- 
ment program. 

Student trustee senior 



history major, Amy Zellers 
announced that the next 
trustee meeting is on Nov. 
15. 

The Dining Concerns 
Committee said that there 
is no name for the new din- 
ing hall yet and also 
announced that there will 



be food vendors at Chandler 
Dining Hall on November 6. 
Interfraternity Council 
announced that Gamma 
Tau Kappa Epsilon and 
Student Senate will host 
speaker Greg Smith, as well 
as two bands and casino 
night on Nov. 1 from 6-8 



p.m. 

The senate also announced 
the following upcoming 
events: Dance at American 
Legion, five dollars on Nov. 
2 and a safety walk at 5 p.m. 
on campus on Nov. 8. 




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And my presidential endorsement goes to... 



Zach Hause 
Columnist 

s_hldalby®clarion.edu 



Stephen T. Colbert! 
That's right, after nearly fif- 
teen minutes of carefully 
considering the idea of run- 
ning for President of the 
United States, The Colbert 
Report's Stephen Colbert 
has announced that he is 
running for President of the 
United States as a 
Democrat and a 

Republican... but just in the 
South Carolina primary 
election. But that does not 
forbid us writing him in on 
the primary ticket here in 
Pennsylvania! 

Anyone who watched 
the Colbert Report on 
Tuesday last week saw the 
earth shattering announce- 
ment concerning Colbert. At 
first I wae a bit hesitant of 
voting for a man who was 
just known for his work on 
Strangers with Candy and 
lampooning of political hap- 
penings, but then, for my 
birthday I received a copy of 
Colbert's new book "I Am 
America (and so can you!)" 
from my parents. 

After reading the first 
few chapters, I was sold. 
Colbert, though often time 
perceived self centered and 
blatantly arrogant, has a 
number of great ideas for 
setting this country 
straight. Pretty much it is 
not about right or left any- 
more, it is all about straight 
forward progress. 

For example, when an 
eagle flies, how does it get 
fi>om California to the New 
'&rk Island, or from the red- 
wood forest, to the gulf 
stream waters? Well, it does 
not fly left or right, it flies 



straight. And if you're say- 
ing to yourself "well, actual- 
ly, it could go West to East," 
then just put down this 
paper, pick up a ball peen 
hammer and smack yourself 
in the side of the head with 
it a few times... and then 
continue to read. 

As Americans, it is our 
duty to elect someone that 
has the ability to remain 
convicted in their beliefs 
and rise above party politics 
no matter the cost. Stephen 
Colbert is my man, he is 
your man, he is our man. So 
this election, be sure to 
write in Stephen T. Colbert 
on your ballot. Let's be 
America together! 

But before deciding to 
become America with Dr. 
Stephen Colbert, D.F.A., I 
had to weigh my options 
with the Democratic candi- 
dates, as I am a registered 
Democrat (although some- 
times, well, most of the 
time, even the members of 
my own party make me 
question my own sanity... 
especially in figuring out 
how most of them got to be 
such prominent political fig- 
ures). 

Hillary Clinton, love her 
or hate her, pretty much has 
this election wrapped up. 
But not wrapped up in the 
traditional sense of the 
term. She has it wrapped up 
like a cheap condom found 
in the pants pocket of a suit 
coat bought from a Goodwill 
dollar bag sale. It might 
work, but chances are it will 
fail miserably. 

Hillary has a personaU- 
ty comparable to a typicalj^ 
bartender. Hillary, like most^ 
bar tenders, Works best 
when she gets what she 
wants, which is a low level 
of harassment about her 



performance and a good- 
sized tip. 

When Hillary was First 
Lady in the early nineties, 
she worked feverishly to get 
a universal health care cov- 
erage system (not one per- 
son exempted!) implement- 
ed into our country. She was 
spittin' and spattin' about 
the evil insurance compa- 
nies' grip on our checkbooks 
and the alarming increase of 
the costs of health insur- 
ance. Man, she was tough on 
that. But like the attempted 
privitization of Social 
Security, her plan was 
quickly forgotten. 

So here we are a few 
years later with health 
insurance companies 

endorsing her for president 
and donating thousands of 
dollars to her candidacy. 
Insurance costs are now ris- 
ing at record rates and the 
insurance lobbyists are 
trailing right by Hillary's 
side. Well, I have to ask, 
rhetorically of course, what 
the hell happened? 

The answer is really 
quite simple. She became a 
politician and saw how the 
system really works. She got 
herself elected senator of 
New York, started taking 
special interest money from 
the same companies that 
give to people she claims to 
disagree with "strongly" in 
the Senate, but most impor- 
tantly, she realized that it is 
not about striving for the 
good of the whole anymore, 
it is about campaign contri- 
butions from people who 
praise the work that she 
does. She then lets them 
plan her "new" health .care 
system. In other words, she 
is getting them their drinks, 
accepting their compliments 
and taking all of their tip 



money straight to the bank. 
She is America's next bar- 
tender, and I hope she can 
make a good White Russian. 

Next in line is Barack 
Obama. When I close my 
eyes and listen to Obama 
talk, all that I can hear is 
the Rock calling out Stone 
Cold Steve Austin. Barack 
starts talking about immi- 
gration reform and all that I 
can hear is the Rock going 
off about laying the smack 
down. Sorry Barack, either 
hire a new speech writer, or 
get a Brahma Bull tattooed 
on your shoulder and learn 
how to do the People's 
Eyebrow. 

Lagging around a stag- 
nant thirteen percent poll 
standing is charismatic 
John Edwards. Edwards, 
former Senator of North 
Carolina has almost every- 
thing it takes. He is bright, 
likable, well groomed ($400 
hair cut - worth every 
penny) and is a Good Old 
Boy from the South... but no 
one is listening to him. John 
Edwards has done every- 
thing that he could possibly 
do to steal attention from 
his opponents, but it just is 
not working. Maybe he 
could try a different kind of 
approach, perhaps setting 
his hair on fire and speaking 
only in Pig Latin. I think 
that I could comfortably 
vote for him if he did that. 

Now that those candi- 
dates are out of the way, we 
can have all of the money 
raised get donated to the 
best possible campaign pos- 
sibility: Stephen Colbert 
and Mike Gravel. Now if we 
could get the two of them to 
run together there would be 
no stopping it! 




During the past several 
years individuals and 
groups have expressed con- 
cerns about the direction 
Clarion University is taking 
into the future. Over the 
past five years class size has 
increased significantly. 
More emphasis has been 
placed on graduate pro- 
grams during the past two 
decades. Like many univer- 
sities and colleges around 
the United States, we seem 
to have forgotten that high- 
er education is a public 
good. 

In his letter to the editor 
to the Clarion Call - 
November 2, 2006 - Randy 
Potter argues that the busi- 
ness model is being applied 
to academic programs here 
at Clarion University. In 
February 2007 a forum was 
organized by the Provost to 
address concerns about 
large class size here at the 
university. At this meeting 
the issue of the business 
model emerged, both direct- 
ly and indirectly. In an ear- 
lier setting - fall faculty 
meeting 2005 - Provost 
Linda Nolan reported sur- 
veys indicate that year after 
year society is less and less 
willing to support public 
higher education with its 
tax dollars. Given that 
politicians in a democracy 
react to voters' wishes, it is 
not surprising that the busi- 
ness model is being appHed 
to Clarion University and to 
other institutions of higher 
learning as a way to cut 
costs. Currently, there is 
much debate concerning the 
application of this model to 



academic programs in high- 
er education. 

To have a better under- 
standing of the issues con- 
cerning class size, the appli- 
cation of the business 
model, and the allocation of 
resources to graduate pro- 
grams we must separate the 
factors the local administra- 
tion controls from the fac- 
tors that are controlled in 
Harrisburg. Without get- 
ting into the details of how 
money is allocated by the 
Pennsylvania State System 
of Higher Education to the 
14 campuses, all would 
agree that each campus 
must work with a limited 
budget in any given fiscal 
year. Again, without the 
details, each local adminis- 
tration has some discretion 
with some of the budget, 
and how it uses its faculty 
and other resources. For 
example, once the faculty 
complement is in place, 
there is more than one way 
to set the class schedule 
even though no more faculty 
can be employed because of 
the budget constraints set in 
Harrisburg. 

Clarion University is 
blessed with many years of 
experience in higher educa- 
tion by its faculty, and mem- 
bers of its administration. 
In his letter. Dr. Potter 
makes the case that smaller 
class sizes are preferred to 
larger ones. This point was 
also made by many faculty 
members at the February 
2007 forum. Perhaps some- 
one in the College of 
Education can provide 
empirical evidence to sup- 
port or to refute this con- 
tention. Indeed, by its 
actions, we can see that the 
Clarion University adminis- 
tration agrees with this con- 



clusion that small classes 
are preferred to larger ones. 
When recruiting students, 
the admissions office here 
promotes the relatively 
small classes at CUP, and 
the individual attention stu- 
dents will experience from 
their professors once they 
arrive on campus as fresh- 
men. At the recent fall fac- 
ulty meeting - September 6, 
2007 - President Joseph 
Grunenwald set small class 
size as one of four objectives 
for the university to achieve 
in the near future. 

The administrators at 
Clarion University must 
search for ways to reduce 
class size given the con- 
straints handed to them by 
the central administration 
in Harrisburg. Currently 
there is policy in place in the 
College of Business 
Administration which 

encourages large class size 
by combining sections 
together into one classroom 
meeting. This policy allows 
an instructor to spend less 
time in the classroom each 
week. It is not clear why 
this policy exists. It must be 
difficult for the administra- 
tion here at Clarion 
University to talk small 
class size when its policy 
encourages larger ones. 
How can we go to 
Harrisburg and argue for 
resources to support smaller 
classes with this kind of con- 
tradiction? 

Class size at an institu- 
tion of higher learning is 
closely related to the mis- 
sion of the university or col- 
lege. Typically, research 
universities have very large 
undergraduate classes com- 
pared to those colleges and 
universities whose missions 
are directed more toward 



teaching. A university such 
as Ohio State or the 
University of Michigan can 
withstand some criticism of 
their large classes in their 
undergraduate curriculum, 
because their missions are 
defined more toward 
research and graduate level 
education. Clarion 

University has never had 
this luxury in the past, it 
does not have this luxury 
now, and it will never have 
it in the future. 

Given that a trade-off 
exists between research and 
class size at the undergrad- 
uate level, we must recog- 
nize where Clarion 
University sits in Academe. 
Clark Kerr - the well-known 
administrator in the 
California system of higher 
education during the 1950s 
and the 1960s - is consid- 
ered to be the architect of 
the three-tier public higher 
education system we see 
throughout the United 
States today. The top tier 
universities in this struc- 
ture are the research uni- 
versities, e.g., UCLA in 
California, and Penn State, 
Temple, and the University 
of Pittsburgh. The middle 
tier schools are the teaching 
universities and colleges, 
e.g., Clarion University of 
Pennsylvania, and Chico 
State in California. The 
lower tier schools are the 
community colleges and jun- 
ior colleges which offer two- 
year associate degrees. 

Under the vision of 
Clark Kerr, California resi- 
dents who wanted a college 
education would be guaran- 
teed admission into the pub- 
lic higher education system 
in California, provided they 
had a diploma from a high 
school in California. 



Editoriiil. Mm lu Ihi' liliir iind Call on Ion 



THE CLARION CALL 

270 Gemmell Student Complex 

Clarion University of Pennsylvania 

Clarion, PA 16214 



Phone: 814-393-2380 
Web: clarion.edu/thecall 



Fax: 814-393-2557 
E-mail: cali@clarion.edu 



Executive Board 

2007-2008 

Lindsay Grystar, Amy Kaylor, 

Editor-ln-Chlef Business Manager 

Co-Managing Editor Co-Managing Editor 



Brittnee Koebler, 
News Editor 

Stephanie Desmond, 
Features Editor 

Eric Bowser, 
Sports Editor 

Ann Edwards, 
Online Editor 



Grace Regalado 
Ad Sales Manager 

Shasta Kurtz, 
Photos & Graphics Editor 

Sarah Dent, 
Entertainment Editor 

Dr. Mary Hlll-Wagner 
Adviser 



Staff 

HSHOL Lacey Lichvar, Ian Erickson, Jamie Richard 
Entertainment; Amy Powers, Amber Stockholm, Joey 
Pettine, John Buffone Sports: Travis Kovalousky, Kelsey 
Schroyer, Jordan Scitchfield, Denise Simons Features: Rob 
Miller, Gregg Bandzuh, Nina Watts PhOtOgaphy and 
fijDUdUiS Jenifer Poblete, Dominic DeAngelo, Adam Huff, 
Sean Montgomery, Stefanie Jula, Andy Lander, Daria 
Kumal, Jessica Lasher Circulation: Nate Laney, Eric Miller, 
Justin Hogue, Brian Picard, Craig Beary, Jessica Cornman 

Policies 

The Clarion Call is the student-run newspaper of Clarion 
University of Pennsylvania and the surrounding communities. The 
Call is published most Thursdays during the academic year. 

The Editors accept submissions from all sources, but reserve 
the right to edit for libel, grammar, length, punctuation and 
obscenity; the determination of which is the responsibility of the 
Editor-in-Chief. 

Submissions must be signed and include contact information. 
They must be received no later than 5 p.m. Mondays. If the author 
of a letter wishes to remain anonymous, they must attach a sepa- 
rate letter of explanation. 

Information boxes (including PSAs) are published only based 
on available space and at the discretion of the Executive Board. 
Publication is not guaranteed. 

Communication majors may earn a print co-curricular as a 
member of The Call staff. They should schedule their co-curricular 
v^hen scheduling classes. Only students who fulfill their responsi- 
bilities for the entire semester will be granted a co-curricular. 

The Clarion Call is funded by advertising revenue and the 
Clarion Students' Association. 

The Call is available on campus and throughout Clarion. One 
copy is free; additional copies are $1.00. 

■ Opinions expressed in this pubiication are 
ttiose oftlie writer or speal(er, and do not 
necessariiy reflect the opinions of the news- 
paper staff, student body, Ciarion University 
or the community. 



However, no one would be 
guaranteed admission into 
Cal-Berkley or into UCLA. 
In its obituary of Clark Kerr 
(Dec. 2, 2003), the New York 
Times reported that Kerr 
has been called "the Henry 
Ford of higher education." 
We must recognize that 
Henry Ford is best known 
for making a basic automo- 
bile - specifically the Model 
T - affordable to the mas- 
sive middle class. He is not 
remembered for engineering 
the best automobile on the 
road and making it avail- 
able to all in the middle 
class. 

Members of the Clarion 
University community must 
recognize that we are in the 
middle tier of institutions in 
the Kerr model. No matter 
what we do we cannot com- 
pete with the graduate pro- 
grams at Penn State or Pitt. 
Clark Kerr warned of turf 
battles emanating from 
institutions in each of the 
three tiers. Kerr saw these 
turf battles brought on by 
mission creep. 

Consequently, he advo- 
cated policy to hold the line 
on mission differentiation. 
If we follow Kerr's advice, 
and allocate our scarce 



resources with an eye on our 
mission, we can achieve 
wonders. Indeed, we can 
achieve objectives that 
UCLA and Penn State 
either are unable or are 
unwilling to achieve given 
their missions. 

The latest data indicate 
about 68 pei'cent of high 
school graduates in the U.S. 
go on to some form of higher 
education within five years 
after they graduate. Given 
that we are in the middle 
tier, we are going to have a 
good number of first genera- 
tion college students in our 
classes. 

Richard C. Levin, presi- 
dent of Yale University, said, 
"No university has the 
resources to be the best... in 
every area of study. We 
[Yale University] must 
strive for excellence in 
everything we do, but we 
cannot do everything." As 
members of the Clarion 
University community, like 
the wheat farmers of west- 
ern Kansas, we must take 
the advice of President 
Levin when we plan for the 
future. 

Lynn A. Smith 
Department of Economics 



Page 4 



TmcutMOircim 



November 1.2007 



Fsitms 



steps towards a more veggie-friendly Ciarion 



Stephanie Desmond 
Features Editor 

s_sadesmond®clarion edu 

With the recent debate 
about "going green" and the 
benefits of organic products, 
vegetarianism is a growing 
lifestyle in the U.S. 

Vegetarians represent 5 
to 15 percent of Americans 
(Health: The Basics, sev- 
enth edition) and 40 percent 
of students 

(httpV/www.dineoncampus.c 
cm). 

Reasons for becoming a 
vegetarian vary from person 
to person. Some do it for ani- 
mal rights, others to live a 
healthier life and others 
because of simple dislike of 
meat. 

"1 feel humans have no 
logical reason to eat meat. 
We can survive without it 
and are actually healthier 
without eating meat." said 



Elijah Daubenspeck, a jun- 
ior psychology major 

"I truly never liked meat 
and never wanted to eat it. 
My mom would always have 
to force me and when she 
wasn't looking I would feed 
it to the dog or give it to my 
friends," said Shannon 
Salak, a junior early child- 
hood education major. 

With all the emphasis 
on healthier living, it would 
seem that vegetarian- 
friendly food choices would 
be readily available both on 
and off campus. 

According to Jeff 
Ciauger, Director of Dining 
Services at Clarion, 
Chartwells offers students 
many options in the 
Chandler Dining Hall, 
Double Treat Bakery and 
Gemmell Student Complex. 

He said that although 
the options differ if you are 
a vegetarian or vegan, there 
are many to choose from. 




Atypical mes<l<at the GardeiiCafe on Sixth and Main: vegetarian 
and organic sandwich, salad, soup and iced tea. (The Clarion 
Call/Andy Lander) 



These include salads, fresh 
fruits and vegetables, 
cheese or peanut butter and 
jelly sandwiches, veggie 
wraps, the salad bar in 
Chandler and more. 

Vegetarian students on 
campus have differing opin- 
ions when it comes to their 
options on campus. 

Four of seven students 
rated the University's con- 
cerns about vegetarians and 
their options as moderate 
(one rated good and two 
bad). But, three of seven 
also said that the options on 
campus are adequate. 

"As far as healthy vege- 
tarian options, I don't think 
there's many, and as far as 
vegan options go, I haven't 
seen anything," said 
Daubenspeck. 

The students' main con- 
cern is the lack of variety 
when eating on-campus. 
They feel that there should 
be more solely vegetarian 
options offered and more 
diverse foods, like Indian or 
Asian. They would like to 
see an area specially 
designed to meet their 
nutritional needs. 

"Serving white rice and 
steamed vegetables hardly 
seems like a proactive 
stance towards healthy liv- 
ing," said Daubenspeck. 

"I can't be the only vege- 
tarian on campus, so they 
should definitely have more 
options," said Salak. 

Gauger said that there 
is not enough of a demand 
for the options on campus, 
though. He said dining serv- 
ices finds that many stu- 
dents want to practice a veg- 
etarian lifestyle, but when 
they are presented with 
other options they take 



them. 

"It's a balancing act," he 
said. "We can't just concen- 
trate on the vegetarians 
because we need to accom- 
modate everyone." 

Besides food options, 
Chandler also features a 
"food choices" icon system. 
One or more differently-col- 
ored icons are featured for 
each food choice. Among 
these options is a vegetarian 
icon. 

Using these icons both 
in Chandler and through 
their Web site, students can 
develop a nutrition plan to 
help them make decisions 
concerning their meals each 
day. 

There are few options 
off-campus for vegetarians. 
Some places offer veggie- 
burgers or other meat-free 
meals. Most require the cus- 
tomer to request his or her 
meal to be meat free. 

Students don't have to 
go too far anymore, though, 
because a vegetarian 
restaurant opened on Main 
Street the week before the 
Autumn Leaf Festival. 

The Garden Cafe on 
Sixth and Main is located 
inside of the organic food 
store Sage Meadow. In the 
front corner of the store, a 
bar- style counter and tables 
were added along with a 
meat-free menu. They offer 
sandwiches, salads, soups, a 
juice bar and other organic 
options. 

Pat McFarland opened 
the store 10 years ago. 
Being a vegetarian for 15 
years prior to the opening, 
she 'fbiind it difficult tb 
maintain the lifestyle 
because vegetarian stores 
weren't close to Clarion. 



';«.*#'#;«-*'-'''- ^«' 




•V 



es of Vegetarians^ 

Vegan: Avoid all foods of animaJ origin, including dairy product* and eggt 
i.«cto-vegetarians; Eat dairy products but avoid flesh tbod> 

Ovo-vegetarians: Add eggs to their diet 
LactO'Ovo-vegetarians: Eat both dairy products and eg^s 

Fesco-vegetarians: Eat fish, dairy products and eggs 
Semi-vegetarians; Eat chicken, fish, dairy products and eggs 




myjt^^y 



m 



#»;t#< 



With her own recipes, she 
developed a menu and 
opened the restaurant. 

She said that the mar- 
ket in Clarion is "slow, but 
growing" and university stu- 
dents and faculty support 
the restaurant and store 
well. 

McFarland recognizes 
that it's hard for vegetarian 
students because of the lim- 
ited selection on campus. 

In the future, she hopes 
that ' the food Served at the 
University JX) have a widfer 
selection be from more cre- 



ative recipes. 

"Get away from the 
'heat and serve,'" she said. 

Vegetarian students 
offer their own tips for their 
peers. Many suggest buying 
food to make on one's own 
and maintaining a varied 
diet by trying new things. 

"Don't live on pizza!" 
said Andrew Resch, a junior 
English major. 

*"student(s)" refers to a 
sampling- of , seven vegetarian 
ClarionUniversity studn^t^ 
who responded via e-mail 



Mime Team isn't wiiat you may tliinic 



Rob Miller 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_rpmiller@clarion.edu 

Usually. when one 
thinks of a mime, images of 
people standing on street 
corners pretending to pull a 
rope or stuck in a box are 
evoked. One thing that 
many people do not know is 
that there are different 
types of mime. An alternate 
type of mime is present at 
Clarion University, in the 
form of the Mime Team. 

Mime is an ancient form 
of art. dating back to the 
Greeks and Romans, and 
continuing to today. Mime 
was popular in many cul- 
tures and some consider it 
the first form of dancing. 



Basically, there are two 
forms of mime. One, being 
the literal form, is the most 
that everyone knows. The 
mime is usually in dark 
clothing with white make- 
up. This form is used to tell 
a story, mostly comedies, 
about a conflict that the 
main character is having. 
This form of mime was 
made famous in America by 
actors like Charlie Chaplin 
and Marcel Marceau. 

The other type of mime 
is the lesser known mime, 
called abstract. It is more of 
an art form or expression, 
usually done to music, used 
to convey or generate feel- 
ings. 

Clarion's mime team is 
part of the Lift Every Voice 
Gospel Family (LEV), which 



has been at Clarion 
University since 1991. 
Besides mime, the group 
features singing, step-danc- 
ing and other types of 
music. The LEV has been 
part of various events, 
including Gospel Fest, 
Autumn Leaf Cultural 
Night, the Community 
Prayer Breakfast. 

Sara Watkins, a fresh- 
man mass media arts, jour- 
nalism and communication 
studies major, is a first-year 
member of the mime team. 

Watkins said she initial- 
ly was interested in Mime 
Team because she is a praise 
dancer, which is a lot like 
miming. 

"It's more of a combina- 
tion of dance and Mime," 
explained Watkins. "It's 



Organization 
Spotlight 



kind of just creative move- 
ment." 

Practices for the mime 
team take place on 
Saturdays from 4 p.m. to 9 
p.m. in the Tippin Dance 
Studio. Watkins said that 
practice usually begins with 
a scripture reading, then a 
prayer and continues with 
practice of a routine. 

Watkins said that 
although they haven't had 



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formal meedngs yet or 
planned je\^ents for the 
futurM^ey will travel with 
LEVas much as possible. 

"We usually mime along 
to whatever song the gospel 



is performing," said 
Watkins. 

The Mime Team and 
LEV is open to anyone and 
members are always wel- 
comed. 



Dinner witli tiie president 




ADVISING INFORMANT 

Have questions about making the most of your education at Clarion? 
We'll find the answers! 



I can't get in to a class that I really need. What do I 



do? 



If you are able to show the professor that it is nee 
essary for you to be in the class at that specific 
time, you can see if he or she will let you in. 
Pick up a "Permission to Enter Closed 
Section" form from the Advising or depart- 
ment offices. Contact the instructor and tell 
them why you need to schedule the class. If the 
professor lets you in, fill out the form and have 
it signed by the department chair. The form must 
be submitted to the Registrar's office on the date it 
was approved. 



Advising Informant is a service of Clarion University's Advising Office. If you have any ques- 
tions you would like answered, e-mail the office staff at advising@clarion.edu. 




November 1.2007 



Tm CLARION CALL 



Page 5 



1' 



9 



V 



The procrastinator's best friend: caffeine 



Lindsay Grystar 
Editor-in-Chief 

s_llgrystar®clarion.edu 



With Starbucks popping 
up on every corner and cof- 
fee shops appearing on 
every college campus, it's 
easy to make the connection 
that many college students 
depend on caffeine to get 
through their busy lives. 

For many, caffeine 
dependency starts in their 
college years. Whether you 
are busy with activities and 
studying or just going out 
and partying, college stu- 
dents are notorious for get- 
ting Uttle sleep. Especially 
when it is time for midterms 
and finals, students find 
themselves reaching for caf- 
feine to make it through. 

According to a study 
released by The University 
of New Orleans, four out of 
five college students con- 
sume caffeine on a daily 
basis. 

Caffeine is now known 
as a drug, and it has been 



proven that more people are 
addicted to it than any other 
drug, including tobacco, 
alcohol and marijuana. 
Caffeine also produces with- 
drawal symptoms, including 
restlessness, nervousness, 
insomnia and more. These 
symptoms can last four to 
six hours after just one cup 
of coffee. 

Like any other college 
campus. Clarion has many 
coffee drinkers. According to 
Sioban McNeill, assistant 
director of retail operations 
at the Gemmell Ritazza 
Cafe coffee shop, they go 
through around 180 pots of 
coffee per week. Because it 
is mostly students visiting 
the cafe, the baristas at the 
Gemmell Ritazza usually 
see the same customers 
everyday 

"We tend to know [cus- 
tomers] as 'cappuccino girl' 
or 'espresso guy' based on 
what they get every day," 
said McNeill. 

In addition to regular 
coffee, the Gemmell Ritazza 
also uses three to four 



pounds of espresso beans in 
lattes and cappuccinos per 
week. Neither of those fig- 
ures include the coffee shops 
located in the library or the 
bakery by Chandler. 

With coffee shops so 
accessible and in multiple 
places on college campuses, 
students are able to stop on 
the way to class or grab a 
cup of coffee while studying 
at the library Outside of col- 
leges, Starbucks and other 
coffee shops are popping up 
everywhere, some with 
drive-thru's, making them 
accessible for people on the 
way to and from work. 

Michelle's Cafe, located 
on Main Street, is a local 
example of a popular coffee 
shop. According to Ashley 
Valone, a Michelle's Cafe 
worker and Clarion student, 
the cafe sells 12 pounds of 
brewed coffee per day, along 
with four pounds of espresso 
beans per day Michelle's 
Cafe also hosts events, 
including open mic night, 
attracting more college stu- 
dents. 



In addition to college 
students consuming caffeine 
regularly, what about dur- 
ing finals week? Students 
stay up later and get up 
earlier to finish that last 
minute studying. 

"We see a boost both in 
the morning from staying 
up late and at night to finish 
studying. The library would 
see the biggest amount of 
coffee drinkers during finals 
week however," said 
McNeill. 

According to a study 
done at Loyola University of 
New Orleans, "Caffeine is a 
powerful stimulant to the 
central nervous system and 
its main purpose is to pro- 
duce clear, rapid thought, 
and above all, keep fatigue 
at bay. Although caffeine is 
proven to increase the pro- 
duction of adrenaline and 
may speed up reaction time 
in simple arithmetic skills, 
it has been proven to worsen 
performance in longer, more 
complicated word prob- 
lems." 

Caffeinated products 



are heavily advertised, but 
the harmful side effects of 
caffeine are not known 
among college students. 
Other more serious side 
effects come from addictions 
to caffeine including birth 
defects, high blood pressure, 
heart disease, obesity and in 
rare cases cancer If you are 
having difficulty falling 
asleep, are easily irritated, 
suffer from frequent 
headaches or find yourself 
needing to start your day 
with caffeine, you may be 
addicted. Doctors recom- 
mend keeping track of how 
much caffeine you consume 
everyday as a way to moni- 
tor intake. 

Other than coffee, many 
other drinks consumed daily 
also contain caffeine. Teas, 
soft drinks and even some 
flavored smoothies can con- 
tain caffeine without you 
even realizing it. 

"We do sell decaffeinat- 
ed Pepsi, but it is the slow- 
est seller," said McNeill. 

But how much caffeine 
is really in products you con- 



sume every day? And how 
much is too much? 
According to 

ConsumerReports.com, 
Mountain Dew has 37 mil- 
ligrams of caffeine in an 8 
ounce serving, a Starbucks 
Coffee Frappuccino has 83 
milligrams and Red Bull 
has 70 milligrams. Other 
products that have caffeine 
include Cannon's Low Fat 
Coffee flavored yogurt, with 
36 milligrams, Starbuck's 
Java Chip ice cream with 28 
milligrams and a one-fourth 
cup of M&M's with 8 mil- 
ligrams. 

A moderate intake of 
caffeinated products, one to 
two a day, seem to be safe 
for most people. Consuming 
more can lead to an addic- 
tion to caffeine and the 
aforementioned health prob- 
lems. 

So next time you think 
about grabbing a cup of cof- 
fee to help you study, keep 
in mind that energy boost 
you think you need could 
end up not being healthy for 
you in the long run. 



Spreading breast cancer awareness at CUP 



Gregg Bandzuh 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_gsbanclzuh@clarlon.edu 

Every year during the 
fall, people become aware of 
things that are around 
them. The leaves are chang- 
ing different colors and the 
temperature is getting cold- 
er. 

But, one month in the 
fall raises awareness of 
something other than the 
weather; October is 
National Breast Cancer 
Awareness Month. 
''* ' Men and women across 
tft'e icbuntry get involved 
with different events that 
help raise money for breast 
cancer causes. College cam- 
puses also hold different 
events to raise money for 
breast cancer cures, includ- 
ing Clarion. This past 
month, there was plenty 
going on for the cause. 

Each year, Sigma Tau 
Delta and the English Club 
hold "Reading for the Cure" 
to benefit Susan G. Komen 
for the Cure, the world's 
largest network of breast 
cancer survivors and 
activists. 

There was a full house 
for this year's event, with at 
least 18 alumni who came 



back to participate in or 
support Reading for the 
Cure. 

A group of faculty and 
students from Slippery Rock 
University were also in 
attendance, along with two 
representatives from the 
Komen Pittsburgh Race for 
the Cure, Jo Ann Meier and 
Carolyn Oblak. Meier made 
the opening remarks for this 
year's event. 

There was also a two- 
week quilt raffle for breast 
cancer research and educa- 
tion. By the end of the raffle, 
the groups raised $5,500. 
Because of < this .fundraiser,; 
Ciarion University's 

Reading for the Cure will 
remain a sponsor of the 
Race for the Cure for an 
11th consecutive year. At 
the end of the evening Sally 
Byers, of Countryside Quilts 
in Knox, Pa., drew the win- 
ning raffle ticket. Since she 
has donated one of her very 
own quilts for the fundrais- 
er for all of the past 11 
events, she draws the win- 
ner every single year. 

Door prizes were also 
given away throughout the 
evening. All door prizes 
were donated from individu- 
als and businesses in the 
community. 

Clarion University 




Tf)^ yeomen's voileybqH^ team raised money for breast cancer 
research] ;^yfie///ng f-^hirts and ribtyons at "Dig for a Cause. " (The 
Clarion Call/Jess Lasher) 



acknowledged students, 
employees, organizations 
and community members 
for service during the 11th 
Annual "Excellence in 
Service" Recognition 

Reception. Clarion's 

Community Service- 

Learning Office sponsors 
the reception. 

Sigma Tau 

Delta/EngUsh Club was 
involved with fundraising 
for the Race for the Cure 
and the Komen 

Foundation's fight against 
cancer. Over $1,600 was 
raised in the reading event. 
Dr. Kevin Stemmler, a pro- 



fessor of English, is advisor 
of Sigma Tau Delta 
Fraternity and the English 
Club. He is very serious 
with his involvement with 
the Komen Foundation in 
fundraising for the Race for 
the Cure. Stemmler also 
received this award in 2000 
for all of his generosity and 
concerns. 

The Clarion University 
volleyball team helped con- 
tribute to the cause Oct. 26. 
They held an event called 
Dig for the Cure. Each team 
member took donations for 
about 20 pink ribbons. Pink 
T-shirts were also sold. 



Currently, they have about 
$500 that will go directly 
toward breast cancer 
research at UPMC in 
Pittsburgh. 

Zeta Tau Alpha regular- 
ly holds events to support 
breast cancer research. The 
cause has been their philan- 
thropy since 1994. In 
October, they went to 
Pittsburgh Steelers and 
Clarion University football 
games and gave out pink 
ribbons. They also held 
"Think Pink" on campus 
Oct. 27. They had a table in 
the Gemmell Student 
Complex where they sold 
baked goods and had infor- 
mation about breast cancer. 
Boxes were also at the table 
to collect pink lids as part of 
their ongoing competition 
with Indiana University of 
Pennsylvania for Yoplait's 
"Save Lids for Lives" cam- 
paign. They also tied pink 
ribbons around the trees 
and poles outside of 
Gemmell. 

On Mother's Day this 
past May, the Clarion Young 
Democrats (CYD) joined a 
record breaking crowd of 
36,000 in Pittsburgh's 
Schenley Park to participate 
in the annual Susan G. 
Komen Race for the Cure. 

Together, the CYD Team 



completed the 5K walk and 
raised $415 for breast can- 
cer screening, treatment, 
education and research. The 
members in attendance for 
the group were Ryan 
Souder, president; Aaron 
Fitzpatrick, web director; 
faculty advisor Dr. Kevan 
Yenerall, associate professor 
of political science; and his 
wife. Nee Yenerall. 

Komen for the Cure's 
mission is to end breast can- 
cer forever by (l) 
Empowering people to take 
charge of their health care 
through awareness and 
early detection and, if diag-* 
nosed, to survive, (2) 
Ensuring quality of care for 
all, regardless of race, eth- 
nic background, language, 
income or insurance status, 
and (3) Energizing science 
to find the causes and cures 
of breast cancer in the first 
place (http://www.komen. 
org). 

The Susan G. Komen 
Race for the Cure has 
invested nearly $1 billion 
for breast cancer screening, 
treatment, education and 
research, becoming the 
largest source of nonprofit 
funds dedicated to the fight 
against breast cancer in the 
world. 



Nina Watts 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_nawatts@clarion.edu 

Most students don't like 
when professors assign 
research projects for the end 
of the semester. James 
Laurelli has been doing his 
for three years. 

Laurelli is from Bucks 
County Pa, and graduated 
from Central Bucks High 
School East. He is currently 
a senior at Clarion and is a 
dual major in biology with 
concentration in ecology 
evolution and physics. He 
majored in biology because 
he is interested in fossils 
and remnant things. For 
physics, he noticed that his 
nanotech minor would fill 
requirements, so decided to 
be a dual major. 

Laurelli came to Clarion 
because he wanted a small 
college and it was good for 
him financially. 

'The schools I looked at 
were large, plus I don't like 
cities," he said. "People took 
the time to speak one on one 
with me to explain the pro- 
grams, so I decided to 
attend Clarion." 

Laurelli is an honors 



student and is involved with 
the Society of Physics 
Students (SPS). In his spare 
time he listens to music, 
plays video games and 
hangs out with friends. 

"I don't really have a 
hobby; I just like to do regu- 
lar things," he said. 

Laurelli is doing an on- 
going research project, 
"Increasing the 

Effectiveness of 

Photovoltaic Solar Cells 
[solar energy] Using 
Nanotechnological 
Methods." 

"I did this project 
because it was related to my 
major and was one of the 
projects he offered," he said. 

Under supervision of Dr. 
Joshua Pearce, he conduct- 
ed research on trying to 
reduce the cost of solar cells 
by using nanotechnology to 
develop a monolayer, mak- 
ing it more cheap and effi- 
cient. He is now in his third 
year of research. 

"Solar energy is expen- 
sive, about $10,000," he 
said. "We wanted to lower 
the cost so underdeveloped 
counties can afford solar 
panels." 

Some of the nanotechol- 
gical methods he uses are 



with common substances, 
like dishwashing liquid, 
that can increase the effi- 
ciency of the solar cells. 

Last month, Laurelli 
was selected to present the 
project for the 

"Undergraduate Research 
Day at the Capital" in 
Harrisburg on Oct. 2. The 
event shows legislatures the 
projects that are going on in 
public and private colleges 
in Pennsylvania. 

His project was selected 
from 44 projects that were 
presented in the Spring 
2007 Undergraduate 

Research Symposium at 
Clarion University. Dr. 
Steve Harris, a biology pro- 
fessor, and Dr. Brenda Dede, 
assistant vice president for 
academic affairs, chose his 
project because they 
believed it had statewide 
application. 

"Dr. Harris called me to 
see if I wanted to partici- 
pate. I accepted because this 
project is a big issue, also it 
would give me good presen- 
tation experience," Laurelli 
said. 

The event had two 
goals: to show that research 
is important to the develop- 
ment of college students and 




to show how students can 
produce valuable research 
that can support the com- 
munities. 

Forty posters were pre- 
sented at the conference. 
They focused on sciences, 
social sciences and humani- 
ties and were showcased in 
the Capitol Building. The 
students stood next to their 
posters and defended their 
research to legislators, lob- 



byists and Capital visitors. 

"It was very interesting. 
It was neat to find that 
there were other projects 
similar to mine," he said. 

During the summer, 
Laurelli participated at the 
Penn State University nan- 
otech program, which is 
required for his major. He 
said they have a good facili- 
ty and he had a good experi- 
ence with the program. 



Laurelli will graduate in 
the spring and will use his 
engineering experience to 
work in the industry field. 

'The nanotech field is 
very general in graduate 
school. I'm not sure which to 
concentrate on, so I will 
have to think it through 
before I start," he said. 



Page 6 



TM CLARION CALL 



November 1. 2007 



November 1, 2007 



im CLARION CALL 



Page 7 



MuHiimit 



Recycled Percussion rocks Clarion for a second time 



John Buffone 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sjdbuffone®clarion.edu 

For the second year in a 
row, a huge audience of both 
younger and older people 
poured into the Gemmell 
Multi-Purpose Room for a 
free concert featuring "junk 
rock" band, Recycled 
Percussion. 

The band was founded 
by lead drummer, Justin 
Spencer, in the New 
England area. They orginal- 
ly started playing through- 
out New Hampshire at local 
schools and throughout the 
Manchester area at local 
clubs. Eventually, they 
found their way into playing 



for colleges. 

Now, years later, 
Recycled Percussion has 
been guests for such events 
as NBC's "Today Show" and 
NBA playoff games, as well 
as during football games. 
They have also performed 
with such stars as LL Cool 
J, 311 and Godsmack. 

The group is currently 
traveling around the United 
States for their new "Man 
vs. Machine" tour. The 
band's sound makes it truly 
unique to other bands 
because they play their 
music on anything that will 
make a sound. 

The performance kicked 
off around 7:30 p.m. to the 
excitement of a highly 
enthusiastic crowd. The 



MPR truly had the concert 
environment with a profes- 
sional light show and a band 
merchandise stand selling 
posters and DVDs during 
the show. The group's per- 
formance had only one 
tempo: furious. The intensi- 
ty level was high from start 
to finish and the crowd 
reacted very positively. 

Spencer and fellow 
drummer Ryan Vezina fran- 
tically delivered the heavy 
beats from every day items 
such as buckets, garbage 
cans, metal pipe, and even 
ladders while Jim Magoon 
accented the songs with his 
electric guitar. DJ Pharaoh 
mixed the background 
music and added sound 
effects at fixed times during 





Recycled Percussion combines a mix between rap and rock to produce an extremely unique 
sound. The sound is a perfect blend between the two very different types of music. The band uses 
every day items like buckets, garbage cans, metal pipes, etc. in order to create this sound. (The 
Clarion Call/Andy Lander) 



Recycled Percussion performed in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room on Oct. 29 at 7:30 p.m. The 
band, which originates in the New England area, was founded by lead drummer Justin Spencer. 
(The Clarion Call/Andy Lander) 



the performance. The mix 
between playing on man- 
made instruments and the 
background music makes 
the perfect combination of 
rock and rap music. 

The band played their 
distinct beats along with 
such popular songs as 
"Living on a Prayer" by Bon 
Jovi and "Stairway to 
Heaven" by Led Zeppelin. 

In the middle of the 
show, Spencer performed a 
solo boasting that he was 
the "fastest drummer in the 
world" with an average of 20 
drum strokes per second as 
said by his fellow band 
members. 

Recycled Percussion 
had a distinctive stlM|pr{ 



ence about them as well. 
With such occurrences as 
band members sliding down 
ladders, Spencer's skilled 
drum stick tricks and drum- 
mers jumping from instru- 
ment to instrument, it was 
impossible for the show to 
go stale. 

At one point towards the 
end of the night, every band 
member had a power tool in 
his hand scraping it against 
the metal beams creating a 
shower of sparks that lit up 
the MPR. 

"They were here last 
year and we had to bring 
them back" said University 
Activities Board 

Chairperson Erica 

}^miraa<|^, 1,^'We fcookgd 



them as soon as we could 
last spring to ensure they 
could make it back." 
Hillebrande added that pre- 
vious success and atten- 
dance was a big factor in 
bringing Recycled 

Percussion for a second 
straight year. 

Since 2002, the band 
has played for more than 
half a million college stu- 
dents each year. 

Recycled Percussion is a 
one of a kind, award win- 
ning band that has had suc- 
cess all over the nation. If 
their material continues to 
progress, they may one day 
be a huge force in the music 
industry. 



Talent show brings in various contestants 



Amber Stockholm 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alstockhol@clarion.edu 

The Leadership 

Institute joined by Clarion 
University combined to host 
the 2007 Talent Show in 
Gemmell Multi-Purpose 
room on Oct. 26. 

The MPR was filled with 
enormous energy from excit- 
ed performers, friends and 
families all gathering for the 
show. Ten contestants made 
up the talent show curricu- 
lum, varying from singers, 
dancers, comedians, rappers 
and guitarists. There was 
something to interest every- 
one at the show and audi- 
ence members walked away 
with a great experience. 

The night's MC's Bonita 
Mullen and Adrian White 
got the night rolling by get- 
ting the audience excited for 
the upcoming talents. The 



talented performances 
included Spencer Marshall 
offering a singing and guitar 
act that opened the show, 
followed by Ashley Super 
who sang and rapped her 
own lyrics in both English 
and Spanish and choreo- 
graphed her entire routine. 

Other performances 
throughout the night includ- 
ed the Clarion Hip-Hop 
team, numerous singers and 
rappers, the dance group 
Impulse, and Andrew Smith 
with a comedic performance, 
not to mention an intermis- 
sion act. During the inter- 
mission act, people per- 
formed, but they were not 
actually competing the tal- 
ent show. 

The performers compet- 
ed for 1st, 2nd and 3rd 
prizes consisting of $150, 
$50 and movie tickets. 

After all the great per- 
formances it was time for 
the three judges to deliber- 




Andrew Smith puts on a comedic performance at this year's tal- 
ent show on Oct. 26 in the Gemmell Multi-Purpose Room. (The 
Clarion Call/Jess Lasher) 



ate and choose three lucky 
winners. Winners of the 
night in first place was 
Impulse members, Chris 
McCarthy, Michael Smalls, 
Sonia Spears and Shanai 



Walker. Second place was 
won by a dance routine per- 
formed by Khaleena Yates 
and Chantelle Wilson, leav- 
ing the comedian who kept 
everyone laughing Andrew 



Smith in third place. The 
crowd for the evening was 
energetic and helped give all 
the performers a boost. 
Clarion Hip-Hop dance 
team member Heather Nale 
felt the energy. For her, the 
best part of the performance 
was "the adrenaline rush 
when you get up there! it's 
an amazing feeling." Nale 
stressed that anyone who 
has something to offer the 
show should definitely con- 
sider participating next 
year. 

One of the three judges 
of the evening, Emmanuel 
Jones, felt it was extremely 
hard to judge the show 
"because everyone did so 
well." Jones also felt the 
show "let the University 
know that their students 
are creative, talented and 
diverse." The differences in 
each act helped to keep the 
show interesting enjoyable 
for all. Leadership Institute 



president Fadzai Mudzinea 
was very pleased with what 
the organization accom- 
plished with the talent show 
stating "We expected a lot, 
but overall we exceeded our 
expectations and I couldn't 
be more proud of everyone." 
If you didn't get to catch 
this years talent show, then 
you definitely missed out. It 
was a great time for those 
who performed, the specta- 
tors and those who helped 
organize the event. There 
certainly is an immense 
amount of impressive talent 
walking around Clarion 
University, and the 2007 tal- 
ent show, did a great job 
showcasing it. Those who 
performed should be proud 
of their performances. It 
was a huge hit with the stu- 
dent body and for all those 
who attended. 



Five students compete in Insomnia Film Festival 



Amy Powers 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

s_alpowers§clarion.edu 

A team of five Clarion 
University students took on 
the challenge of making a 
three-minute film in only 24 
hours to compete in the 
2007 Insomnia Film 
Festival, sponsored by Apple 
Inc. 

The competing team 
consisted of Mark Peelman, 
who was the captain, Liz 
McNamera, Liz Fisher, Nick 
Bigatel and Andrew Resch. 

The idea for competeing 
in this years Insomnia Film 
Festival was presented to 
Peelman by Technical 



Director Ed Powers and 
Assistant Technical Director 
Rob Hoover, both of the 
University Theatre 

Department. Peelman, who 
was very interested in the 
project, assembled the team 
based on who he thought 
would be the best. Each of 
the team members had a 
particular specialty in the 
filming process. 

Participating teams in 
the film festival were e- 
mailed a list of 10 elements, 
from which each team must 
choose three to incorporate 
in their film. Each team had 
only 24 hours to cast, write 
film, edit, underscore and 
upload a three-minute film. 
The editing process for the 



film was completed using 
iMovie and the music was 
composed using 

Garageband. 

Once Team Powers, the 
name that is representing 
Clarion University, received 
the list of 10 elements, the 
brainstorming began. 

Resch, who was the desig- 
nated writer, came up with 
the idea to do a Film Noir 
satire which cast and cos- 
tumed in period style attire, 
hair and make-up by 
McNamera. The actors for 
"Film Blanc" were students 
Dominic DeAngelo, Jamie 
Richard, Amy Sikora, Drew 
Leigh Williams, Stacy 
Solack and Joey Pettine. 

With casting complete, 



Bigatel began filming. 

"There were no 
rehearsals which was weird 
for me because I'm used to 
rehearsing for shows, but 
that made it even more 
exciting," said Sikora of the 
time contraints. 

The film was shot in 
three to five hours, using 
two different locations on 
campus. 

The editing process then 
commenced in the Tech 
Theatre lab. While editing 
the film, the team was 
plagued with difficulties 
with the computers. 

"Computers froze up 
randomly, sound clips 
moved themselves around 
and to the very last second 



computers were breaking 
down on us," said Bigatel. 

Once the film was suc- 
cessfully edited, Fisher cre- 
ated underscoring to com- 
pete the work on "Film 
Blanc." Garageband was 
used to create jazz styled 
music for the background. 
Fished also added in the 
voiceovers for the film. 

The finished product 
was then uploaded to 
Apple's Web site. 

Fisher said, "Overall, 
the acting, storyline, film- 
ing, lighting and editing 
turned out wonderfully con- 
sidering all of the challenges 
we faced." 

There are two categories 
in which competing teams 



can win. The categories are 
a peer review and a judges 
review. The winner of the 
peer review, which is based 
on votes, will receive a free 
MacBook Pro as well as 
Final Cut Studio 2, Logic 
Studio and Shake. The top 
25 films after a month of 
peer voting are then 
reviewed by some of the top 
professionals in the film 
industry. 

"Film Blanc" can be 
viewed and voted for at 
http://edcommunity.apple.co 
m/insomnia_fall07/item.php 
?itemID=1306. 

Peer voting continues 
until midnight on Nov. 9. 



The horrific scenes never | seniors host recltal in Marwlck- Boyd 

stop In ''30 Days of Night" 



Joey Pettine 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJmpettineOclarlon.edu 




"30 Days of Night" 
Director: David Slade 
Rating: 4/5 

In every horror movie 
there is what one might call 
a "saving grace." A loophole 
which every scared little 
child might find and upon 
which they might feel safe 
at night. 

In "A Nightmare on Elm 
Street," there is the simple 
fact that Freddy couldn't get 
you unless you dreamt of 
him. In the "Wolfman," 
there had to be a full moon 
for the beast to appear. Also, 
in "Dracula," "The Lost 
Boys," "Fright Night" and 
every other vampire movie, 
there has always been the 
promise of sunlight, that 
bright ball of pure flame 
which rises over the horizon 
every morning to scare away 
the dark and the monsters. 

In "30 Days Of Night," 
based on the award winning 
graphic novel, there is no 



such "saving grace," for 
above the arctic circle, for 
one full month, the mon- 
sters shall play. 

In "30 Days Of Night," 
directed by David Slade, 
vampires travel to the iso- 
lated town of Barrow, 
Alaska and as the sun sets 
for an entire month they 
ravage the town, unhin- 
dered. But there are those 
who refuse to go quietly into 
that good night. 

Led by Josh Hartnett 
("Sin City," 'The Faculty") 
and Melissa George ("Dark 
City"), a band of humans 
make a stand against the 
vampires. Even the human 
servant to the dastardly 
undead, played by Ben 
Foster ("The Laramie 
Project"), can't put an end to 
the rebellious humans. 

The truly interesting 
thing about "30 Days Of 
Night" is the speed of the 
film. It is not an action 
packed vampire slaughter- 
house Evil Dead-esque 
movie, though it was pro- 
duced by Sam Raimi. It is 
instead a slow-paced movie 
where the gradual transi- 
tion from one horrific scene 
to the next leaves the audi- 
ence more and more anx- 
ious. 

While "30 Days Of 
Night" is filled with some 
pretty awesome scenes, 
such as driving a thresher 
into a sea of vampires, it is 
the acting and atmosphere 
of the movie that keesp the 
audience intrigued. 

Combined with brilliant 
visuals from the eerie shark 




like make up of the vamps, 
their images were taken 
directly from the panels of 
the graphic novel, to scenes 
so visually stunning they 
take your frozen breath 
away. 

The only true downfall 
of "30 Days Of Night" lies 
within the vampires them- 
selves. While the unholy 
spawn are still ungodly fast, 
able to leap across roofs 
with a single bound, and 
capable of ripping open your 
throat with one canine filled 
bite they are portrayed ani- 
malistically while at the 
same time organized. The 
vampires are led by a vam- 
pire named Marlow, who 
looks more like a middle 
aged lawyer than a blood- 
thirsty plasmavore. 

Add in the fact that the 
vampires talk in a strange 
made up language that only 
they can understand, some- 
thing that sounds more like 
Inuit, ironically, and it is 
almost as if the human 
qualities, the idea that this 
beast was once your friend 
or neighbor, is taken away 
and it unfortunately brings 
the film down. But only a 
little. 



Sean Kingston makes me 
want to get up and dance 



Sarah Dent 
Entertainment Editor 

s sedent@clarion.edu 




"Sean Kingston" 
Sean Kingston 
Rating: 4.5/5 



The first time that I 
heard Sean Kingston's 
"Beautiful Girls." I literally 
almost wrecked my car 
because I was more con- 
cerned with the music than 
what I was actually doing. I 
was probably obsessed with 
this song for over a month 
and would blast it every 
time it came over the radio. 

Kingston, who's real 
name is Kisean Anderson, 
was 'raised in Kingston, 
Jamaica. He uses the name 
Kingston to represent where 
is he from. The most sur- 
prising fact about Kingston 
is the fact that he is only 17. 

I just think his music is 
so happy-go-lucky and its 
definitely a feel-good kind of 
music. He has been classi- 
fied as bdth pop and rap, 
although I personally think 
he sounds more like a mix- 
ture between rap and rag- 
gae. 

I thought it was so 
weird that I fell in love with 
Kingston's songs. I am defi- 
nitely more of a rock/punk- 
rock kind of girl. I just think 
that it's the beat of the 
music and the kind of mood 



it puts me in. 

Just when I was getting 
sick of "Beautiful Girls," 
wouldn't you know that he 
put out his second single 
"Me Love." 

I think that "Me Love" is 
probably the most fun song 
on the entire album. It's one 
of those songs that you can- 
not help but dance to. The 
song is about a girl he has 
been dating for awhile who 
moves away. 

"Why'd you have to go- 
oh/ away from home/ me 
love." 

After obtaining the 
whole album, I was a little 
hesitant to listen to it. I was 
afraid it was going to be one 
of those albums where all 
the good songs are released 
as singles as soon as it 
comes out. I was wrong. 
Once I listened to the entire 
album, I realized that there 
were only two or three songs 
that I didn't like. 

"Kingston" is definitely 
one of my favorite ones. I 
can often be seen singing 
this in my car. This song is 
why I classify him as both 
rap and raggae. The chorus 
is more raggae, where the 
rest of the song is mainly 
rap. 

"I see them coming from 
afar/ 1 got my eyes open I'm 
ready for war/ When I fight 
'mon they know who we are/ 
A Kingston they come from, 
A Kingston they come from." 

Another one I like is 
"Got No Shorty." However, I 
find the irony of this song 
hilarious. Earlier in the 
album, during "Me Love," he 
sings of how he loves his girl 
and wants to be with her. 
Although, in "Got No 
Shorty" he talks about how 
he doesn't have a girl and 
that, in fact, he has numer- 
ous girls in his life. 

"I am the man/ 1 am the 
business/ I'm telling you all 




with God as my witness/ I'm 
really a youth but I'm telhng 
the truth/ 1 am a pimp I got 
them sexy girls/ Got so plen- 
ty don't know who to 
choose." 

"There's Nothing" is a 
duet with Kingston and 
Paula Deanda. In this song, 
they sing about meeting and 
how their relationship has 
progressed since they first 
met. 

"Coz me love's life so 
right/ When she hold me so 
tight, how she kiss me good- 
night." 

Then Deanda responds 
by singing, "Cos he fills up 
my life/ Like the sun, he 
shines bright/ Boy, come 
with me now." 

After first listening to 
this song, I thought it had a 
lot of potential to be a big hit 
for both Deanda and 
Kingston. 

I also love "I Can Feel 
It." It takes that line from 
"In the Air Tonight" by Phil 
Collins. 

Other songs I really hke 
are "Change," "Your Sister" 
and 'That Ain't Right." 

Overall I recommend 
Kingston's music to every- 
one. I don't think that in 
order to like Kingston's 
album you have to like a cer- 
tain type of music. Anyone 
who likes to have a good 
time while listening to 
music would most definitely 
enjoy this album. 




Me//ssa Elmers performs during a senior recital on Oct. 28, accompanied by Bonnie Ferguson 
on the piano. Elmers and Lindsey Allison, both music education majors, performed. (The 
Clarion Call/Shasta Kurtz) 



Gangster's only enemy is Seinfeld 



Chris Lee 

Los Angeles Times 

As anyone acquainted 
with 2005's indie movie sen- 
sation "Hustle & Flow" - 
and its Oscarwinning hip- 
hop anthem - will tell you, 
it's hard out here for a pimp. 
But for a heavily armed, 
cool-as-ice international 
heroin trafficker? Totally 
different story. 

Heading into multiplex- 
es in wide release this week- 
end, Ridley Scott's gritty 
'70s drug-dealer epic, 
"American Gangster," is on 
point to dominate the box 
office, according to pre- 
polling known as "tracking" 
and various industry 
sources. 

The film stars Denzel 
Washington as real-life 
crime kingpin Frank Lucas - 

- presented in "Gangster" as 
a Mafia-style don who 
amassed a huge fortune 
during the Vietnam War 
smuggling heroin from East 
Asia to the Eastern 
Seaboard in soldiers' coffins 

- and Russell Crowe as the 
embattled narc who braves 
widespread police depart- 
mental corruption to bring 
him down. Early inteUi- 
gence indicates the movie 
already has gotten the 
attention of male viewers 
and action-movie fans. But 
its box-office mojo ultimate- 
ly might come from a broad- 
er part of the moviegoing 
population. 

'The word around town 
is the film is tracking 



through the roof with urban 
audiences," said Paul 
Dergarabedian, president of 
the movie tracking company 
Media by Numbers. "And 
urban audiences hold 
tremendous clout at the box 
office." 

To be sure, the movie 
fits squarely into a tradition 
of classic gangster fare, such 
as "The Godfather" trilogy, 
"GoodFellas" and 

"Scarface," that has become 
a cherished cultural touch- 
stone in the hip-hop commu- 
nity - movies that have 
been shouted out and lyri- 
cally venerated in numerous 
rap songs. Toward that end, 
"Gangster" is getting an out- 
side promotional push from 
rapper Jay-Z, one of the 
most dominant figures in 
hip-hop, who is releasing an 
album called "American 
Gangster," inspired by the 
movie. In the past three 
weeks, he has kept busy 
proselytizing for both his 
CD and the film on rap 
radio, hip-hop Web sites, 
MTV and Black 

Entertainment Television. 

According to Chuck 
Creekmur, chief executive of 
Allhiphop.com, the film 
already has been widely 
bootlegged - one of the most 
accurate ways to gauge hype 
in hip -hop circles - although 
the jury is still out on how 
much it could affect the 
film's financial perform- 
ance. 

"As far as interest level 
goes, 'American Gangster' is 
incredibly high. It's remark- 
able," Creekmur said. 



"Everyone's talking about it. 
It's all over the Net. It's all 
over the file-sharing Web 
sites. Everybody wants to 
see this movie." 

(In a strange life-imitat- 
ing-art twist, one of 
"Gangster's" supporting cast 
members, Atlanta rapper 
T.I., was arrested in October 
for allegedly possessing an 
arsenal of machine guns 
and two silencers.) 

Several movie industry 
sources said "Gangster" is 
on track to take in $40 mil- 
lion in its opening weekend- 
which would come as a relief 
to Universal, which sunk 
$30 million into an earlier 
incarnation of the film, 
before shutting it down - 
even with strong competi- 
tion from the Jerry Seinfeld 
animated kid flick "Bee 
Movie." That film has been 
tracking strongly with the 
family audience while rack- 
ing up overwhelmingly posi- 
tive early reviews. "These 
are two movies that could 
help us get out of the six' 
week downtrend at the box 
office," Dergarabedian said. 

A $40-million weekend 
also would represent both 
Washington's and Crowe's 
strongest opening to date. 
Last year, Washington 
established his personal 
best, $29 milhon, with Spike 
Lee's thriller "Inside Man." 
And none of Crowe's films 
has opened to more than 
$35 million since 

"Gladiator" in 2000. 



"Unbreakable" is Just so-so 



Glenn Gamboa 
Newsday 



The Backstreet Boys " 
unlike most of their late '90s 
bubble-gum pop contempo- 
raries, including Britney 
Spears - have gamely decid- 
ed to face the reality of their 
pecuUar situation. 

They know boy bands 
always trump "man bands." 
Nonetheless, the Backstreet 
Boys have opted to trot out 
age-appropriate songs on 
the new "Unbreakable" 
(Jive) album, trying to make 



it work on the strength of 
their strong (and still- 
improving) voices instead of 
up-to-the-moment produc- 
tion. 

It's a noble enough 
ambition, but the execution 
is a bit lacking. The 
Backstreet Boys, who have 
found a home on adult con- 
temporary radio in recent 
years with big power ballads 
such as 2000's "The Shape of 
My Heart" and 2005's 
"Incomplete," offer up lots 
more to choose from on 
"Unbreakable." The problem 
is there's very little separat- 



ing the new single 
"Inconsolable," a piano-driv- 
en, sorta-rock, sorta-R&B 
ballad, from "Incomplete," 
or from the new songs 
"Unmistakable" and 

"Unsuspecting Sunday 
Afternoon," for that matter. 
And aside from the 
dance-oriented "Everything 
but Mine" and the 
"Backstreet's Back" update 
"Panic," the Boys are pretty 
much stuck in the same 
gear for the rest of the 
album. "Unbreakable?" 
Maybe. But 

"Unimaginative," too. 



Underwood rides to the top in sales 



Todd Martens 
Los Angeles Times 

The top of the U.S. pop 
album chart gets a country 
makeover this week, a 
charge led by Carrie 
Underwood. 

The country-pop star 
and "American Idol" winner 
follows up her 6-million-sell- 
ing debut album, "Some 
Hearts," with a No. 1 bow. 
Her "Carnival Ride," one of 
six debuts in the Top 10, 
sold 527,000 copies, accord- 
ing to Nielsen SoundScan, 



in its first week in stores. 

"Some Hearts" peaked 
at No. 2, and it's still in the 
Top 100 in its 102nd week. 

The collaboration 

between Robert Plant and 
Alison Krauss, "Raising 
Sand," lands at No. 2. The 
pair are expected to tour in 
2008 in support of the 
album, a collection of coun- 
try-inflected covers pro- 
duced by T-Bone Burnett. 

Country singer Gary 
Allan enters at No. 3 , his 
"Living Hard" selling 69,000 
copies. It's his third consec- 
utive Top 5 debut. 



Breaking up the string 
of country debuts is the first 
solo offering from System of 
a Down vocalist Serj 
Tankian. His "Elect the 
Dead" arrives at No. 4. 

The string of new debuts 
knocks Bruce Springsteen & 
the E Street Band's "Magic" 
out of the Top 10. The album 
tumbles from the top spot 
last week to No. 12. 

Look for Britney Spears 
to make some headlines for 
her music next week, as her 
latest. "Blackout," will vie 
for the No. 1 spot 



Pages 



Tlffi CUkRlOH CALL 



November t 2007 



lllissilifis 



November 1. 2007 



Tiffi CLARION CALL 



Page 9 



Greek Ms, Travel, Employ menl, For Rent, Personals, and (leneral ids 




LAKEN APARTMENTS- 
fully furnished, IMitififi 
IncilifijL Available Fall 
2008/Spring 2009 for 1-3 
people. Houses available for 
2-8 people. Exceptionally 
nice and CLEAN. Call Patty 
at (814) 745-3121 or 229- 
1683. www.lakenapart- 
ments.com 

ROLL OUT OF BED AND 
GO TO CLASS! Houses and 
apartments next to campus. 
See them at www.grayand- 
company.net or call FREE 
Gray and Co. 877-562-1020 

Next to campus, various 
houses and apartments. 
Accommodating 1-4 stu- 
dents or groups of 3-4. Some 
include utilities. Rent starts 
at $1200 per semester. Visit 
us online at 

www.aceyrental.com or call 
Brian at 814-227-1238 

EAGLE PARK APART- 
MENTS, FULLY FUR- 
NISHED, INCLUDES 
UTILITIES 3 BLOCKS 
FROM CAMPUS. LEASING 
FOR SPRING, SUMMER, & 
FALL. SAFE, CLEAN, AND 
BEAUTIFUL. (814)-226- 
4300 www.eagle-park.net. 
Located at 301 Grand Ave, 
Clarion Pa. 

Now renting: Fall 08-Spring 
09. 1-2-3 & 4 person fur- 
nished apartments. Only 
one block from campus. 
Some with utilities includ- 
ed. Off street parking 227- 
2568 

FOR RENT: 2008-2009 
school year. 2 bedroom 
house for females close to 
campus. 226-6867 

SILVER SPRING 
RENTALS ■ Apartments for 
2-4 people and houses for 2- 
8 people available for Fall 
2007/ Spring 2008 semes- 
ters. Call Barb at (814)-379- 
9721. 

2 Bedroom Apartment avail- 
able. Close, walk to campus. 
Private entrance, recently 
updated. Furnished, $1600 
a semester per student. 
Utilities included. Monthly 
negotiable. Call 814-316- 
6547 

Apartments for rent - Fall 
08-Spring 09. 2,3,4 bed- 
rooms available. All utilities 
included, close to campus. 
Call Scott for appointment 
at 434-589-8637 

Student rental: i bedroom 
with shared kitchen / living 
room. Fully furnished. Air 



conditioning, private bath, 
washer and dryer. Smoke- 
free. Walking distancie from 
the University Available for 
Spring semester. 

$375/month. Includes utili- 
ties. Call 226-5203 




Spring Break 2008 . Sell 
Trips, Earn Cash and Go 
Free. Call for group dis- 
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Guaranteed! Jamaica, 
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800-648-4849 or 

www.ststravel.com 




My precious son, 

Jesus always loves and 

cares for you. 




By 
Darla Kumal 

'What do you think 

about the construction 

on campus?" 



Congrats Red Socks! 
Boo Rockies! 



Happy 1 year babe I love 

you! 

Love, 

Sarah 



Eric sucks, 

Love, 

Brittnee 



The Red socks suck, Rockies 
felt bad for them and will 
forever reign over the Red 
socks. The end! 



Stephanie, 

Thank you for being a good 

friend and sneaking me out 

of jail in, a suitcas^. . 

Love, 

German Girl 

Shasta, 

Road trip soon! 

Gstar 

bk! 



"%•"""** 




Public Belatjons 
Student Society 
of America 



Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m. 
in Founders 107 

Guest Speaker: 

Jared Myers 

of Ketchum, Inc. 

All PRSSA members are 
encouraged to attend. 

All students welcome! 




Amber Makokele 

Freshman, Finance 

"It's an inconvenience, but 

I'm looking forward to the 

outcome." 



Stefanie Parker 

Sophomore, Mass 

Media Arts, 

Journalism & 

Communication 

Studies 

"I think that there should 

only be one project going 

on at a time." 




Angela Snyder 
Freshman, Art 

"It's frustrating to walk 
down and around the hill." 



Molly Reckner 

Sophomore, 

Secondary 

Education English 

"There's nothing better 

than waking up to a 2,000 

ton alarm clock." 




Neighbor, 

Just checking to make sure 
you are reading the newspa- 
per from cover to cover. 
Love, 
Neighbor 

GO STEELERS! 



GO PENS! 



ON rUESVAY, M(9VEMBEK 6TH> V0TI , 

MONTANA 

FOR 

Clarion County 

AUDITOR 

acemontana(g)ccybernet.com 

(814)226-7316 

PAW fon v>Ymi CA ^vwa ri 



Bring on 
the Winter 



wi/li Millersville Universilys Winter Session 



Classes are in session from 
December 17 -January 13 

Registration begins October 24 





Winter 

session 




Enroll Today! 

» Most Millersville courses are transferable. 



» 



» 



Take a course while at home for winter break 
- attend a class on-campus or online. 

Earn credit in an accelerated format. 



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^ V[i]lersvi]le University 



SEIZE THE OPPORTUNITY 



2540a Clarion, 3 col x 10.5, November 2007 



Football keeps it close to the end, but falls to #20 lUP 38-31 



Jordan Scritchfield 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

sjsscritchf®clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct 27 - On 
Saturday afternoon at 
Memorial Stadium, our 
Golden Eagles gave lUP all 
they could handle, but 
ended up on the wrong side 
of the stick once again, los- 
ing to the Crimson Hawks 
38-31. 

Memorial Stadium was 
electric on Saturday after- 
noon, as the Clarion faithful 
were elated by the Golden 
Eagles performance. They 
were cheered every play, 
until the clock read 0^00. 

There was not much 
scoring in the first quarter, 
with the only touchdown 
courtesy of Clarion running 
back Eddie Emmanuel, as 
he rushed for 11 yards with 
9:55 remaining to give the 
Golden Eagles a 7-0 lead. 

In the second quarter, 
with 13:311eft, lUP running 



back Poohbear McNeal had 
a six-yard touchdown run to 
break the Crimson Hawks 
even with the Golden Eagles 
7-7. 

Not much later, wide 
receiver Pierre Odom 
caught a 44-yard touchdown 
pass from Tyler Huether to 
give Clarion a 14-7 lead 
with 10:32 remaining. 

lUP's Matt McNeils 
booted a 25-yard field goal 
to pull I UP within four at 
14-10 at the 7:36 mark. 
That is how the score would 
remain until halftime, and 
the Golden Eagles took that 
lead into the break. 

After halftime, the 
Golden Eagles took advan- 
tage of a third quarter fum- 
ble by lUP on the second 
half kickoff that was recov- 
ered by Quintyn Brazil at 
the lUP 19. After Huether 
rushed for 16 yards to the 
four, Emmanuel rushed four 
yards for his second touch- 
down of the game to extend 
the Clarion lead to 21-10 




The Golden Eagles football team 
recent game. Clarion dropped to 
PSAC West play with their 38-31 
(The Clarion Ca///Shasta Kurtz) 

with 12:50 remaining in the 
third. 

lUP stormed back, as 



is seen in action during a 
0-9 overall this season 0-4 in 
loss to lUP on Saturday Oct. 27. 

quarterback Andrew 

Krewatch threw a 34-yard 
touchdown pass to Garrett 



Lestochi to cut the Clarion 
lead to 21-17 with 10:50 
remaining in the third. The 
Crimson Hawks scored 
again with 0:48 seconds left 
in the third when Krewatch 
threw another touchdown 
pass to Anthony Cellitti to 
put lUP ahead for the first 
time in the game, 24-21. 

In the fourth quarter, 
with 12:03 remaining, lUP 
scored again, this time with 
Krewatch hooking up with 
Dan Pickens in the end zone 
for a 3-yard touchdown to 
extend the Crimson Hawk 
lead to 31-21, giving them 
21 unanswered points. 

Clarion then drove 67 
yards in ten plays after the 
lUP score, capped with a 12- 
yard touchdown pass from 
Huether to Alfonso Hoggard 
with 9:27 left in the fourth, 
lessening the lUP lead to 
31-28. The game seemed to 
be out of reach when the 
Crimson Hawks scored on a 
33-yard touchdown run by 
McNeal, his second of the 



game, to expand the lead to 
38-28. 

The Golden Eagles 
would not fold, however, as 
they then drove 51 yards to 
the lUP nine yard line, 
where Nick Sipes kicked a 
28-yard field goal with 1:42 
remaining, making the 
score 38-31. The attempted 
onside kick from the Golden 
Eagles was recovered by 
lUP at their 41 yard Hne, 
and they were able to run 
out the clock. 

Clarion quarterback 
T>'ler Huether completed 24 
of 45 passes for 260 yards 
and two touchdowns. Eddie 
Emmanuel rushed 12 times 
for 26 yards and two touch- 
downs. Alfonso Hoggard 
caught nine balls for 81 
yards and a touchdown, and 
Pierre Odom hauled in 
seven passes for 119 yards 
and a score. 

Clarion will now travel 
to 6-3 Edinboro to take on 
the Fighting Scots this 
Saturday at 2 pm. 



Clarion announces the addition 
Of women's golf for fall 2008 



Swim and dive teams finding eariy success 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 31 - Clarion 
University officially 

announced the addition of a 
women's golf team for the 
fall 2008 season on Tuesday, 
Oct. 30. 

Clarion also announced 
Marie Gritzer as the 
women's golf coach. Gritzer 
served as an assistant on 
Clarion's cross country and 
track and field teams for the 
past eight seasons. 
L..Even though Gritzer 
waT*"**"*' jiist officially 
announced as the coach on 
Tuesday she has been hard 
at work for quite some time. 

"I spent all summer on a 
lot of the logistics," Gritzer 
said. "Continuing work on 
all the administrative 
things, working with the 
NCAA, and doing budget- 
ing, scheduling and recruti- 

hg." 

Recruiting will be the 
biggest challenge to the job. 
Most coaches only have to 
recruit a few athletes per 
year, while Gritzer is given 
the task of trying to field an 
entire team in just one off- 



season. 

"Women's golf is becom- 
ing more and more popular, 
but there is still a lot of 
places where the girls don't 
have full teams and have to 
play on the men's teams'. 
Some of these girls are 
falling through the cracks 
because you don't get to 
hear much about them," 
Gritzer said. 

Gritzer isn't just looking 
for incoming freshman to fill 
the team. She hopes that 
the program could spark 
interest with current 
Clarion University students 
who would be interested in 
joining the' team. Gntzef 
said she encourages anyone 
interested in joining the 
team to call or stop by her 
office. 

"Ideally I'd like to have 
12 to 15 golfers. I'd like to 
have an 'A' team and a 'B' 
team and then alternates," 
Gritzer said. 

Coach Gritzer still 
expects the team to be fairly 
young and having to get 
used to college life when the 
fall season starts. 

"The first year we are 
going to take it light around 
here. We will have a young 
team and the freshman will 



be adjusting to college life, ' 
Gritzer said. "I don't want 
them to have to be on the 
road every week in the fall." 

The women's golf team 
will join the Pennsylvania 
State Athletic Conference 
(PSAC). This season the 
PSAC had three women's 
golf programs, California, 
Kutztown and West Chester. 

Next year's PSAC will 
also see Mercyhurst and 
Gannon join, to total six 
women's golf programs. 

With six women's golf 
programs the conference 
should be able to have it's 
..Otwu-.womea's championship 
''a^t''"t"K'e*'encf'of the season. 
This season the women and 
men played together in the 
PSAC Championships held 
Oct. 20 and 21 at Wren Dale 
Golf Club. 

California's women's 
team finished second overall 
beating our four men's 
teams finishing eight shots 
off the lead. 

"I'm always willing to 
learn and this is a new chal- 
lenge," said Gritzer. 
"Recruiting is the name of 
the game right now. It's 
exciting to be starting some- 
thing new." 



Eric Bowser 

Clarion Call Sports Editor 

s_ekbowser@clarion.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 30 - The 
Clarion University swim 
and dive teams traveled to 
Carnegie Mellon on Oct. 27. 

The women's team (2-0) 
set two pool records in their 
180-120 win over the CMU. 

Lori Leitzinger set one 
in the lOQ-yard backstroke 
with a time of 58.12. 

The other pool record 
came courtesy of the 
women's 200-yard freestyle 
relay team of Leitzinger, 
Gina Mattucci, Kelly 
Connolly and Kaitlyn 
Johnson. 

Leitzinger also made 
her national qualifiers in 
both the 100 and 200-yard 
backstroke event. 

Swimming coach Mark 
Van Dyke said the women's 
team will be very competi- 
tive this season despite 
graduating 13 girls last 
year. 

The men's team (M) 
lost their match 155-135. 

Sophomore Ryan Thiel 
won two individual events, 
the 50 and 100-yard 
freestyle events, and was on 
two relay winning events, 
the 200-yard medlay relay 
and the 200-yard freestyle 
relay. 

"Our men have been 



much better, but Carnegie 
just had too much depth," 
Van Dyke said. 

The dive team has also 
seen success this year and 
so far has had four divers, 
Teagan Riggs, Ginny Saras, 
Jena Gardone and Kayla 
Kelosky, qualify for the 
NCAA Championships. 

"Everyone has been 



working hard and improv- 
ing everyday," said diving 
coach Dave Hrovat. 

The swim and dive 
teams will travel to 
Shippensburg on Nov 3 and 
host Duquesne on Nov 10. 

"We're really starting to 
gear up with some very hard 
and intense workouts," Van 
Dyke said. 



Richard wins PSAC's, 
Clarion finishes eighth 



Denise Simens 

Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_dnsimens@clarion.edu 



KtlTSffOWN, Oct. 27 -On 
Saturday Oct. 27, Golden 
Eagle Erin Richard won the 
PSAC women's cross coun- 
try championship at 
Kutztown. Richard is the 
first female Clarion cross 
country runner to win a 
PSAC championship title in 
school history. 

Richard, who is seeded 
first for this weekend's 
NCAA Regionals in Lock 
Haven, finished with a time 
of 23:02.1 and was 16 sec- 
onds faster than Edinboro's 
second-piace winner and 
last year's defending PSAC 
champion Rachel Lanzel, 
and 47 seconds faster than 



SUppery Rock's third place 
winner Jamie Wright. 

Overall Clarion placed 
eighth out of fourteen teams 
with a score of 168 points. 
Bloomsbuirg 'won « the mesi 
wi«h-66't>oifttt.'^^ ¥ah weU> 
as a team at Kutztown but 
are looking to improve upon 
the eighth place finish," said 
head coach Jayson Resch. 
"We are looking for a top six 
finish this week at Lock 
Haven." 

NCAA Regionals will be 
held Saturday Nov. 3 on the 
course in Lock Haven that 
the Golden Eagles were able 
to compete on earlier this 
season. PSAC athletes 
shape the top ten seeds for 
the meet, and "we are hop- 
ing to have two to four run- 
ners place in the top 30 this 
weekend," said Resch. 




INTRAMURAL NEWS 



Dou| Knipp « Iniiamuraf. Recr<»t^n, & Cbb Sport Dlr«<tor 3934667 



1 1/1/07 




Flag Football Flay-off R^ults 
t<y30/7 Rrst RotMHl B\\m Division 
ffylalt Hean Machine 4 1 '24 

W« Cant B T KSAC 4UB 

C kmikm UntouchaWti 4S42 OT 
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Gar<tenGr>o FNR 4128 

Inckets poi«<l at RIC and OfAim 
Th«re were «vera! jgreat fim round 
prtm in tte Bhie Oiviwon. "We Can't 
B^t Them" e^^ out "KSAC on the 
bst play of tfie game mth a toochdovm 
and extra point to win! "Cauasta^ 
Invasion" intercepted a pais for 3 points 
on the first pky of the ov^me perbd!! 



That Team 
Lodcdown 
l^htsOut 
Your Horn 
3^5 
Hmi M^h 



CHdki CMcka 40-23 
tfdhn was halo... SM 
Pen Pushers 42-17 
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Ry Bait 34-^ 

KSAC 44-14 



Sign-up NOW..* 

Indoor Soccer 

3 on 3 Ba$keti)all 

Tug of War 

Table Tennis 



Singles Racquetball 

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•Students on!/' 
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Doisbie Bin^nation Tournament 
Walk-in registrations acc^ted 

3 on 3 Ba$ketii>all Resiits 

ProtaWy Gonna Win Hard Knocks F 
WHN©<ficl(20.|7 
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Super Stars 100% Pure... 2 1 -20 

♦We will take more teams! 

Intramuiai's on tfie Web 
clarion.edu/intramurals 

kicltKftni all TEAM photos for each 
sport Download your copy todiy! 



Intnmuni All-Star Soccer 



T 




Volleyball Play-off Results 



iO/lMI 
h your Face 
CU Staff 
We Love B 
Yes or No 



•Fajak to Davb for g&al* 
CUP Aii-Stars defeated the lUP Cbb team 
on Simdiy 2-0. fkycM Davis scored the 
first goal early m die gime off an assist fay 
Dan i^iak. Mickenzie Luke scored ^e 
second goal unasststtd, later in the first 
half. Both c«ms tightened up the defense 
in (he second half and no ad<^^ttl goals 
wert scored Great job guys! 

VoNeybaJl Final Reg Season Ranldngs 
Ca*Rt€ DhflskMi 

CI We Love Banner 9-0 

C4. Yes or No M 

CIO. CU Staff 6-4- 1 

Cl.l^rtm 52.1 

C3.h Your Face 54-1 

C5.AthletChalef^W SS 

C^ The Ugly Sifck 4^1 

C7. The Wolverines 2-7-1 

C9. No Names J-M 



Martin 21-14, 14-21. IS-H 
AthChalHIl *(Replay) 
NoNames 21-18.21-12 
Ugly Stick 24-21 2I.(S 
* This game is being rep&yed 6m to a 
concent over flayer eligibility. 
VoNtybiiH Finat Rtg Stison Rmkingi 
Women*! Division 
WI.ZTA 6*1 

W3. CU Girls 42 

W2.CU*$Rnest 54 

W6.D^Zeta 3-3-2 

W7. Bailers 3-5 

W4. Tttee«iaamnini2 1-7 

CLUB SPORT CORNER 

in>Une Hock»!y Cluto - lou tast game to RHU 
(fed) 5-1 Jake BuchdS had boih gosfs and titer S 
pmci they arc 3-2. hm Mhion n Mth m ihc 
lague in icorwjs w«h 9 points on 3 goal* and i 
assios. Hn ^ nmu put h«m in th#d m tfm 
ategory. The next gime ts li/l j^ 9:30 j^«nsc 
RMUlbkic), They arc S-O. 
Women's Ru|^ Club - Finwhcd Ow season 
wwh a wn agimst Ohio Northern lht» record 
fcr the season was 3-4, good for fifth pfcKe m 
ttM Me^eny Ru|by Uiioa 
Miii's Ri^y 0\A •> Lok to Frenctsom 
University hn SKurday. The fmsl record was 4- 
4, whKh {>t)ccd them «xth m the ARU. 



W:M^ 






' mstM f«iMlfc:«si' 



Page 10 



Tffl CLARION CJkLL 



November 1.2007 



Sfirts 



My. FmUhII loses to II1P?8-?I Oarioo adds Homeii's pl( l«a 



Volleyball seniors prepare for final home game of their careers 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer®clarlon.edu 

CLARION, Oct. 30 - It's an 
overused cliche, but time 
really does fly. It seems like 
just yesterday the class of 
2008 was coming into 
Clarion and before you 
know it, it will soon be time 
to step up and receive your 
diploma. In the case of the 
Golden Eagle volleyball sen- 
iors, their "graduation" 
comes this Saturday with 
their final home game 
against Edinboro. 

This year's group of 
Golden Eagles came to cam- 
pus amidst a winning tradi- 
tion in the fall of 2004. A 
rather large recruiting 
class, tallying nine in all: 
Amanda Angermeier, Tressa 
Dvorsky, Kristi Fiorillo, 
Sarah Fries, Vicky Gentile, 
Nicole Harrison, Christina 
Steiner, Lauren Wiefling 
and Lindsay Wiefling. 

With the exception of 
Harrison, who left Clarion 
after her sophomore year, 
the entire group stayed 
intact for their entire four 
year run. As a result. 
Clarion volleyball will lose 




Pictured above are the seniors of the Clarion University volleyball team. This season the seniors 
have helped lead the team to a 24-4 overall record this season and are currently tied for second 
in the PSAC west at 6-3 with Edinboro, who they host Nov, 3. (The Clarion Ca///Jess Lasher) 



eight seniors to graduation 
after this season. While 
excited to be moving on, 
many of the seniors will be 
sad to play at home for the 
final time. 

"I'm pretty nervous," 
said outside hitter Fries. 
"I've been trying not to 
think about it. There a lot of 



memories here and I don't 
want it to end." 

The volleyball class of 
2008's freshman season 
would be one of triumph as 
the team went 29-9 overall 
with a season-ending loss to 
Lees-McRae in the NCAA 
playoffs. Besides the rela- 
tionship on the court, the 



Baseball season over but still making news 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clarion.eclu 

Baseball season is now 
officially over, though I have 
no doubt that the fans of 
Red Sox Nation are still 
toasting their World Series 
victory. 

With their second World 
Series win in four years, the 
Red Sox seem pretty devoid 
of the curse that plagued 
them for the better part of 
the 20th century. 

Congratulations to the Red 
Sox, the 2007 World Series 
champions. 

Also, congratulations to 
the Colorado Rockies. 
Despite the sweep in the 
World Series, the Rockies 
turn-around is nothing 
short of amazing. 
Remember that this is a 
team that finished in last 
place in the National 
League West last season. 
Also remember that this 
team won on a shoe-string 
budget. The only player on 
the roster to make more 
than $5 million was first 
baseman Todd Helton. 

On the other side of that 
spectrum is the Red Sox. 
With a seemingly endless 



amount of money to spend, 
Boston compiled a large 
stockpile of bought talent. 
That being said, kudos to 
the Red Sox for compiling a 
key core of young players 
that included World Series 
contributors Dustin 

Pedroia, Jacoby Ellsbury 
and Jon Lester. With this 
core of young players as well 
as most of their team signed 
until at least 2008, the Red 
Sox are set to compete for 
next season and beyond. 

Despite the Red Sox 
winning the World Series, 
the Yankees still managed 
to grab headlines. Former 
Yankees player Joe Girardi 
has accepted a three-year 
offer to become manager of 
the Yankees. The 2006 
National League Manager 
of the Year with the Florida 
Marlins, Girardi beat out 
Yankee coaches Don 
Mattingly and Tony Pena. 

Deciding to trade in his 
pinstripes for Dodger blue, 
former Yankees manager 
Joe Torre appears set to 
become the new manager in 
Los Angeles. After Grady 
Little's resignation, it 
appears that the path is 
clear for the 67 year old 
Torre to manage the 
Dodgers. 



Also on his way out of 
the Bronx is Alex Rodriguez. 
Announcing his intention to 
opt out of his contract, he is 
now a free agent. 
Rodriguez's announcement 
sent shock waves through- 
out the baseball world, 
sending many general man- 
agers scurrying to check 
their pocket books. 

However, the timing of 
his announcement has 
angered many baseball offi- 
cials who felt that 
Rodriguez's decision should 
have waited until after the 
World Series. 

Rodriguez tops the list 
of what should be a star- 
studded 2007 free agent 
class. In addition to 
Rodriguez, Curt Schilling, 
Mike Lowell, Torii Hunter, 
Barry Bonds, Andruw 
Jones, Mariano Rivera and 
Jorge Posada are all expect- 
ed to end up on the free- 
agent market. Long story 
short, these guys are going 
to make their agents very 
happy men for quite some 
time. 

Finally, the Pirates 
search for a new manager is 
still in the works. With the 
World Series now over, gen- 
eral manager Neal 
Huntington now has the 







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freshmen would go on to 
form many friendships off it 
as well. 

"Coming in freshmen 
year with a large group of 
girls was fun," said Lauren 
Wiefling. 

However, the next two 
seasons would prove tumul- 
tuous for Clarion. Despite 



back to back 20-win sea- 
sons, the Golden Eagles 
would only accumulate four 
section wins, missing the 
playoffs entirely in 2005, 
while barely making it in 
2006. Angermeier, Wiefling 
and Dvorsky would all miss 
significant playing time due 
to various injuries. 

However, this season 
seems to have come full cir- 
cle for the Golden Eagle sen- 
iors. With new coach 
Jennifer Harrison, Clarion 
is 24-4 with a 6-3 PSAC- 
West record after their 3-0 
win against lUP Tuesday 
night. Even more fulfilling 
to the senior class, they will 
be in the PSAC Playoffs for 
the first time since their 
freshmen season in 2004. 

As Dvorsky put it, "I 
think we had a heck of a 
journey to get here, so I'm 
excited for our senior day." 

While the future is 
bright for Golden Eagle vol- 
leyball, there is no doubt 
that this year's group will be 
sorely missed. Statistically 
speaking, Clarion will find it 
difficult to replace what 
they are losing. Going into 
their game against Indiana 
on Tuesday, the Golden 
Eagle seniors have com- 



bined for 1,007 kills, 117 
service aces, 1177 assists, 
172 total blocks and 1,422 
digs this season, 

While Fiorillo has 
enjoyed her team's success 
this year, she is not ready 
for it to be over. 

"This year has definitely 
been the best memory for 
me. It's sad that it's coming 
to an end, but it's been a 
really great four years." 

Even though Clarion 
will have more games to 
play after this Saturday, 
their final home game will 
mark the end of a signifi- 
cant chapter of their playing 
career. 

"We spent the majority 
of our college careers here 
[Tippin]," said Angermeier. 
"Moving on outside of 
Tippin will be weird." 

The senior volleyball 
class of 2008 will look to end 
their home schedule on a 
winning note this Saturday 
at 1 p.m. Win or lose 
though, it has been one suc- 
cessful ride for the Golden 
Eagle seniors. However, the 
old adage of "There's no 
place Uke home" will surely 
be on their minds as they 
play at Tippin Gymnasium 
for one final time. 



Soccer wraps up season with 4-1 loss 



Travis Kovalovsky 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_tckovalovsSclarion.edu 



CLARION, Oct 26 - After 
winning their first game in 
over a month, the Golden 
Eagles soccer teaiil fell 4-1 
to fell to the Shippensburg 
Raiders (8-12) in a cross 
division match this past 
Friday. Clarion's final 
record is 3-6-1 in division 
play and 5-11-3 overall. 

The Raiders opened up 
the scoring in the 25th 
minute when Gayle 
Kuntzmann scored on an 
unassisted goal. 

Jill Miller tied the game 
when she scored on a cross 
shot in the 52nd minute. 
Caitlyn Borden was credited 
with the assist. 

Kuntzmann didn't let 
the tie stand for long. She 
scored again in the 66th 
minute. She finished her 
hat trick performance in the 
81st minute with yet anoth- 
er goal. Mallory Skipp 



rubbed it in the Golden 
Eagle's faces, scoring with 
less than a minute left. 

Both teams had 11 
shots, four in the first half 
and aeven in the second. 
E«chel Schmitx led the way 

it HI 



ie for Clarion. 
Three other players added 
two of their own. 

Kuntzmann led the 
Raiders with three shots. 
Teammate Jamie Goetze 
was close behind with two. 

Despite a rough ending, 
there were some positive 
notes to the season. Senior 
goalkeeper Jess Reed posted 
the best season of her 
career. She ended with 
career highs in save per- 
centage (.797), shutouts (5) 
and goals against average 
(1.72). 

Jill Miller, a freshman, 
led the team with four goals, 
resulting in eight total 
points. She was second in 
shots with 22, trailing only 
Chelsea Wolff who had 28 of 
her own. She ended the sea- 



son leading the team in shot 
percentage, too, with .182, 

Schmitz was second on 
the team in points with 
seven. She had three goals 
and one assist. With 21 
total shptB on goal, she was 
§ecoH8 b^ tHe team iii iUBt 
percentage with . 143. 

There were, obviously, 
downsides to the seasorr. 
Clarion was outshot by its 
opponents 335 to 178. They 
were also outscored 44 to II. 
They had less than half the 
corner kicks that their oppo- 
nents did, losing that battle 
107 to 50. 

Clarion looks to improve 
next season. They will be 
losing three solid starters in 
Reed, midfielder Ashley 
Downs, and defenseman 
Aimee Zellers. 

Clarion finished the sea- 
son tied for fourth place 
with Lock Haven, each hav- 
ing identical division 
records. However Lock 
Haven posted the better 
overall record, 8-10-1. 



chance to interview all of his 
potential managerial candi- 
dates without worrying 
about upsetting playoff 
races. 

Still believed to be at 



the top of Huntington's list 
is Cleveland third base 
coach Joel Skinner and 
Boston pitching coach John 
Farrell. 

According to the 



Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 
Pirates minor league man- 
ager Trent Jewett is also 
believed to be one of the 
front-runners for the job. 



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if you return your completed lease by 
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Clarion. Pennsylvania 16214 





Volume 94 Issue 9 



Novemb^er 8 20'0^ 



CUP efficiency efforts awarded 



m 



Brlttnee Koebler 
Clarion Call News Editor 

s_bekoeb(er@clarion.edu 

CLARION. Nov. 6 - Clarion 
University was recognized 
with a "Partnership Award 
for Innovative Energy 
Solutions" for the 

University's recent imple- 
mentation of innovative 
energy systems that utilize 
natural gas technology. 

The university was not 
required to apply for this 
award, but rather an indus- 
trial partner of CUP submit- 
ted the project. 

According to Joshua 
Pearce, assistant professor 
of physics and coordinator of 
nanotechnology and sus- 
tainability Science and 
Policy Programs, this was a 
very competitive award to 
earn. 

"The award helped rec- 
ognize the University's com- 
mitment to environmental 
stewardship and advanced 
energy technologies," said 
Pearce. "Clarion University 
is positioning itself to be the 
leader in western 

Pennsylvania in sustainable 
energy." 

The non-profit Energy 
Solutions Center made the 
award to the University 
during the Center's 
Technology and Market 
Assessment Forum at the 



Pittsburgh Westin Hotel. 

According to the Oct. 10 
news release from 
University Relations, the 
director of Clarion's 
Biotechnology Business 
Development Center, Robert 
Huemmrich accepted the 
award on behalf of the 
University. 

"We believe that energy 
is the most important issue 
facing soci- 
ety this 
century," 
he said. 
"We have 
made a 
commit- 
ment to 
high-tech 

sustainable Energy systems 
in the operations on campus 
and we hope to continue to 
provide demonstrations of 
the state-of-the-art for local 
businesses and industry." 

Pearce said this is not 
the first advanced energy 
system that has been imple- 
mented at Clarion 
University, but it is "one of 
the most innovative, as very 
few combined heat and 
power systems are coupled 
with renewable energy sys- 
tems-like solar cells." 

However, the 

University's energy efforts 
do not stop here. Within the 
next 10 years, Pearce hopes 
for CUP to be a net energy 
exporter, meaning that the 



projects looking at improv- 
ing energy efficiency on 
campus. 

The CFLs are four times 
more efficient than incan- 
descent bulbs and the uni- 
versity can potentially save 
thousands of dollars 
because of this. 

"If anyone sees an 
incandescent bulb on cam- 
pus report it immediately, it 
is literally burn- 
ing your tuition 
money and 
wasting ener- 
gy," said Pearce. 

Pennsylvania in sustainable en^i-g^. There are liter 



university would generate 
more energy on campus 
then what the campus actu- 
ally uses. 

"We could be a renew- 
able energy provider, rather 
than an energy consumer," 
said Pearce. "Currently we 
buy most of our energy, but 
with systems like the hybrid 
microturbine-photovoltaic 
array we will be generating 



Clarion University is positioning 
itself to be the leader in western 



Senate addresses 
pedestrian safety 



emf^ d^ifs idiM pnoi^ to be 



-Pearce 



a lot of our own electrical 
power and heat." 

Clarion University 
already has one campus 
building. Thorn H, that pro- 
duces all of its electrical 
power with a solar photo- 
voltaic tracker. 

Pearce hopes to repli- 
cate that for the entire cam- 
pus. 

"This is the future of 
energy and I would like to 
see CUP demonstrating it 
first," said Pearce. 

In an effort to continue 
the conservation of energy, 
the university recently 
switched most of its incan- 
descent lights to compact 
fluorescent light (CFLs) 
bulbs because of student 



jy 



ally hundreds of 
things we could 
to to make the 
more energy effi- 



campus 
cient." 

The university is mak- 
ing strides to become more 
efficient with the new 
Science and Technology 
Center. 

The natural gas fired 
microturbine in the new sci- 
ence center will produce 
electricity and will capture 
waste heat, which is called 
combined heat and power 
(CHP), according to Pearce. 

CUP has set itself apart 
as none of the other 13 state 
universities has won this 
award. 

See "ENERGY" 
continued on page 2. 




(PtlQtO coof^WfStoc^rfiolos) 



Lacey Lichvar 
Clarion Call Staff Writer 



CLARION, Nov. 5 ~ 
Faculty senate addressed 
Campbell Hall demolition, 
pedestrian safety and the 
Science and Technology 
Center construction sehed' 
ule at the isljjv. 5 meeting. 
Sue Courson of the 
Institution il liesourses 
Comnattee and assistant 
professor of science educa- 
tion, addressed the con- 



cerns about pedestrian 
safety and crosswalks. 

Courson also 

announced the upcoming 
Safety Walk which will 
determine mem of campus 
that are unsafe for pedes- 
trians. 

The committee now 
has repfesentatioa from 
Diflabilitr " pvices and 
may have a physically d\^ 
abled student go on the 
wftlk. 

S#e "FACyuy" 
Qontinm^ on pag^ 2. 




rof essors earn 



tenure, promotion 



Lindsay Grystar 
Clarion Call Editor-in-Chief 

s_tlgrystar®clarion.eclu 

P:u-nli\ t!it>mbers were 
h President 

Joseph (Jrunenwald for 
rt tenure and pro- 

mouun in Carlson Library 
|g a Promotion and 
•e Recognition 

rtion. 

■l>^ which 

%ponsurta uy Carlson 

(rary and the Offiee of 

le Provost, honored facul- 

who were promoted to 

e pro- 



iiad to 

ongths in 

including 

uni- ctiveness. 



piujeci I 

my ere" 

* and 



'inn- nnd 



said she has taught at 
Clarion for around 18 
years and was promoted 
to full professor at the 
ceremon.?. 

Faculty promoted to 
full professor include: 
Marilyn Harhai, library 
science; Todd Lavin, politi- 
cal science'. Kevin 
Stemmler, English^ and 
Michel, theatre. 

Those promoted to 
associate professor 

include'- Henry Aiviani, 
music; Debbie Ciesielka, 
nursing' Patricia Kolencik, 
education'. Andrew 

Lingwall, mass media arts 
joumalism and communi- 
cation studies; and liaurie 
Oechipinti, anthropology, 
geology and earth science. 
"For promotion, it is 
important to be a good 
icher, and I am pleased 
tnat I am able to work 
closely with students in 
the anthropology program 
and from majors across the 
university in all of my 
' -aid Occhipinti, 
,a he'' ^'"^^^ year 
iarion 1 iv. 

lumbers pro- 



m- 



ugnizea at tne recep- 



PR professional to speal( at Ciarion 



;;; See "PROFESSOR" 
continued on page 2. 



Jamie Richard 

Clarion Call Staff Writer 

sJmrichard@clarion.eclu 

CLARION. Nov. 5 - The 
Public Relations Student 
Society of America (PRSSA) 
will be hosting guest speak- 
er, Jared Myers of Ketchum 
Public Relations 
Pittsburgh, on Nov. 19 at 
7:30 p.m. in 107 Founders 
Hall. 

Myers will speak on a 
variety of public relations 
related topics including the 
life of a public relations pro- 
fessional, recent projects at 
Ketchum, beneficial advice 
on how to successfully break 
into the business and his 
own personal climb to suc- 
cess. 

"I really want to share 
some insight with the stu- 
dents." said Myers. "I want 
to show them the industry 
[public relations] and what 
it's like in the public rela- 
tions workforce." 

Graduating from 

Slippery Rock University 
with a Bachelor of Science 
in Creative Writing, Myers 
currently serves as a senior 
account executive for 
Ketchum Public Relations. 

His duties include man- 
aging budgets and project 
teams for an assortment of 
Kellogg Company brands, 
such as Special K and All- 
Bran. 




Myers has also worked 
among teams who have 
received praise from clients 
such as the Canned Food 
Alliance and Best Buy's 
Geek Squad. 

Previous to working for 
Ketchum, Myers served the 
United States Navy as a 
civilian public affairs officer, 
coordinating media rela- 
tions for ship deployments 
and navy community rela- 
tions programs. 

Myers also worked for 
an advertising and public 
relations agency in Virginia 
Beach as an account execu- 
tive. Being involved in pub- 
lic relations, as well as an 
avid golf and fishing enthu- 
siast, Myers was charged 
with escorting editors, 
reporters and television pro- 
ducers to all of the best golf 
and fishing spots in Virginia 
Beach. Myers is presently 
pursuing his Master of Arts 
Degree in Professional 



Writing from Slippery Rock 
University. 

Ketchum's began in 
1923 when George 
Ketchum, a graduate of the 
University of Pittsburgh, 
founded Ketchum Publicity. 

In the eight decades of 
its existence, Ketchum has 
won numerous awards and 
accolades, making it one of 
the top-rated companies in 
the industry. 

The Public Relations 
Society of America (PRSA) 
has awarded Ketchum 102 
Silver Anvils, more than any 
other company in public 
relations. Most recently, 
Ketchum was the recipient 
of PRWeek's 2007 "Product 
Brand Development 

Campaign of the Year." 

The PRSSA was found- 
ed by the PRSA in 1968. 

Clarion's PRSSA has 
been active for three years 
and works to cultivate a 
favorable and mutually 



advantageous relationship 
between students and pro- 
fessional public relations 
practitioners. 

"This is such a great 
opportunity for not only 
PRSSA members, but also 
for anyone who is interested 
in the public relations field," 
said PRSSA vice president 
of public relations Natalie 
Kennell. "We, as an execu- 
tive board, strive to sched- 
ule events that will be very 
informative and beneficial 
to students, so it's important 
to take advantage of this 
well-known speaker. The 
topics covered by Myers 
should help students who 
plan on breaking into the 
field and also provide them 
with the opportunity to ask 
any questions they may 
have. We are looking for- 
ward to a good turnout and 
a successful event." 

This event is mandatory 
for all PRSSA members. 
However, all students are 
welcome to attend. 

PRSSA meetings are 
held bi-weekly and are open 
to all students intwested in 
becoming a member of the 
organization. 

The organization regu- 
larly offers seminars 
through their parent organi- 
zation PRSA and hosts 
numerous speakers 

throughout the year. 





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Page 10 



Tlffi CLARION CALL 



November 1, 2007 



Siirts 



Miv: Football km lo II P :iy I llarion iiil(l\ Wmm &\\ \m 




DYI: Create your 
own Web site 




CUP can ride with 
the best 




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Volleyball 
clinches PSAC 
playoff birth 



Volleyball seniors prepare for final home game of their careers one copy free 



Kelsey Schroyer 
Clarion Call Sports Writer 

s_kgschroyer@clanon.edu 

CLARION. Oct. 30 - It's an 
overused cliche, but time 
really does fly. It seems like 
just yesterday the class of 
2008 was coming into 
Clarion and before you 
know it. it will soon be time 
to step up and receive your 
diploma. In the case of the 
Ciolden F^agle volleyball .sen- 
iors, their "graduation" 
comes this Saturday with 
their final home game 
against Edinboro. 

This year's group of 
Golden Eagles came to cam- 
pus amidst a winning tradi- 
tion in the fall of 2004. A 
rather large recruiting 
class, tallying nine in all: 
Amanda Angermeier, Tressa 
Dvorsky, Kristi Fiorillo, 
Sarah Fries, Vicky Gentile, 
Nicole Harrison, Christina 
Steiner, Lauren Wiefling 
and Lindsay Wiefling. 

With the exception of 
Harrison, who left Clarion 
after her sophomore year, 
the entire group stayed 
intact for their entire four 
year run. As a result. 
Clarion volleyball will lose 




Pictured above are the seniors of the Clarion University volleyDaii team. Inis season the seniors 
have helped lead the team to a 24-4 overall record this season and are currently tied for second 
in the PSAC west at 6-3 with Edinboro, who they host Nov. 3. (The Clarion Call/Jess Lasher) 



eight seniors to graduation 
after this season. While 
excited to be moving on. 
many of the seniors will be 
sad to play at home for the 
final ti